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I started stringing my own worm harnesses. As I was looking at the ones I had purchased that were pre-made, I noticed that all the harnesses with willow blades had 2 blades and all the ones with Colorado blades only had 1. Can anyone offer any insight as to why this is? Is it plausible to make harnesses with 2 Colorado blades instead of only 1? I did a google search but results turned up nothing useful or informative.

Any thoughts would be helpful and appreciated.

thanks! :T
 

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willows are for faster speeds and colorado are for slower. 2 blades with willows are because they have a smaller spinning diameter and create less vibration and displace less water. colorados can be made into a pair, however, they have to be spaced farther apart so its generally not worth it.
 

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It's like LOTP said..... size for size a Colorado blade creates more lift than any other type of spinner blade. If you use two of them on the same harness you double the lift, which means you'd have to use a heavier weight to keep them down in the water column. Willow leaf blades have the least amount of lift so using two of them on the same harness will be easier to keep down compared to two Colorado blades. Since Willow leaf blades spin in a tighter circle, they put out more flash, and present a bigger profile than a Colorado blade does, as well.

If you're planning on building your own harnesses, and are curious as to what type of blade finish puts off the most flash .... a smooth finish blade puts out the least amount of flash, and presents the smallest profile, but has the brightest flash point. A textured finish blade puts out the most amount of flash, and presents the largest profile, but the flash is diffused because of the angled surfaces on the blade. The flash isn't as bright, but it's the easiest to see.
 

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Thanks for the info. Eventually, I want to learn how to paint and then decorate my own also. Anyone else that does this? If so, where do you shop to get the pieces/parts in bulk- including hooks? I'm one of those, as my friends call me, artsy fartsy kinda people, so this may be a good way to use that to squelch my artsy fartsy appetite. :) :p
 

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Thanks for the info. Eventually, I want to learn how to paint and then decorate my own also. Anyone else that does this? If so, where do you shop to get the pieces/parts in bulk- including hooks? I'm one of those, as my friends call me, artsy fartsy kinda people, so this may be a good way to use that to squelch my artsy fartsy appetite. :) :p
Try Jans Netcraft in Toledo. They also have a web site. One more fact about willow vs Colorado blades. Generally Colorado blades give off more vibration than willow and are better for stained water.
 

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The Inferior Fisherman
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Willows are not only for fast speeds, they start to spin at slower speeds than Colorado's. Willows make a fast high pitch vibration, Colorado's a slower thump. I haven't used a double blade harness in years, doubt I ever will again. The reason I guess, is I don't pull dipsy's.
 

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to add willows will slide thru cover better and generally have less fowling issues when used in weeds.
 

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Willows are not only for fast speeds, they start to spin at slower speeds than Colorado's.
I don't know about how willow leaf blades perform on a night crawler harness. But I've been building bass spinner baits for 10 years, and they sure don't turn at slower speeds than a Colorado blade does on a spinner bait. A willow leaf blade will flop around at some of the speeds that a Colorado blade will be spinning like crazy. Especially when the blades are mounted on a clevis.
 

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I started stringing my own worm harnesses. As I was looking at the ones I had purchased that were pre-made, I noticed that all the harnesses with willow blades had 2 blades and all the ones with Colorado blades only had 1. Can anyone offer any insight as to why this is? Is it plausible to make harnesses with 2 Colorado blades instead of only 1? I did a google search but results turned up nothing useful or informative.

Any thoughts would be helpful and appreciated.

thanks! :T
Double willows are usually used later in the year, when the bait fish are larger. They can be pulled at faster speeds without 'blowing out' like colorados do. A single, larger (size 7 or 8) willow can be very productive, especially out east.
 

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I guess im just the oddball I use double blades on everything. and I catch just as many fish on double colorados as I do on double willows. when I first started fishing the central basin the charter we fished on used double willows so I just stuck with double blades even Colorado blades. my goal speed in july is about 1.8 to 2.0 and they both seem to work at this speed.
sherman
 
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