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Where can I get the cheapest PFD's?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by c75, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. c75

    c75

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    Forgot that I gave the old ones away with the old boat, I figure wal mart probably has them the cheapest, anybody else bought any recently?

    thanks
     
  2. Orlando

    Orlando Set The Hook!

    Why would you want to buy the cheapest you can find, when its something that could save your life? Something to think about
     

  3. If your around a BPS the have the fishing jackets with net over the shoulders for 19.99.
     
  4. All I can say is...wow.
     
  5. c75

    c75

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    what store is BPS?
     
  6. Did not even consider the cheap side of purchase. But when it did come down to buying them for MY boat & MY LIFE or guests I prchased the BEST.

    Not to say I did not consider $$ as to buying at one store & down the street for the same identical one was on sale or $10.00 cheaper. Well of course I tried to take into consideration of a few $$ saved.

    That's why my boat is named "IT's My Life"

    Nik
     
  7. There's nothing wrong with wanting a set of cheap PFDs to have in the boat. You can get 4-packs of the standard orange jackflappers pretty cheap at Wal-Mart, Gander, or Dicks.
     
  8. athensfishin'

    athensfishin' Fighting the Man

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    Yeah honestly why would you go cheap? I mean after all when your looking to save your life there is no point on skimping on the cup holder, fancy color patterns, cookie dispenser and all the other bells and whistles. I mean it's not like they are all approved flotation devices, we all know only the expensive ones are.:rolleyes: Also make sure you get the ones that are rated for White water rapids because you never know when you are going to fish them.
     
  9. i don't need a PFD cause fat floats
     
  10. i have no problem putting those ugly a$$ orange ones from walmart in my boat. the kids jackets are a different story
     
  11. Orlando

    Orlando Set The Hook!

    Yes those ugly Orange ones may keep you afloat but what if you are ejected out of theboat while running? You need a vest that is impact resistant. Its your life but PDF's is someting I dont skimp on
     
  12. ParmaBass

    ParmaBass Kiss The Converse

    I have a set of those "ugly orange ones" in my Jon boat. If I'm ever ejected going 3mph, I think they'll do there job.

    Geez, the guy asked a question and you jump all over him,lol. Mabey money is an issue and he can't buy the best available, or mabey he prefers the ugly orange ones.
     
  13. im not worried about the ejection factor either going only 3-5mph depending on how hard the wind is blowing :p
     
  14. corndawg

    corndawg Go Bulldogs!!!

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    I agree with Flippin fool and Parma bass. I think it all depends on what type of water you’re boating on and what type of boat you’re in. That orange type 2 preserver will work just as well as a type 3 or 5 jacket preserver if used on a low powered or self propelled boat on calm, near shore water where a quick rescue is likely. If you’re on a high powered boat fishing 20 miles out on Erie or cutting through white water, a high impact type 5 is best suited. The type 5 will turn an unconscious wearer face up in the water and the orange type 2 will usually do the same whereas the type 3 jacket preserver will not. I have a 14’ sea nymph with a 9.9 and obviously only boat on inland lakes on nice days. I wear a fishing type 3 jacket when driving and have the orange type 2 for each passenger. :C
     
  15. Orlando

    Orlando Set The Hook!

    Kinda like that insurance commercial with bare minimum coverage?
     
  16. c75

    c75

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    wal mart was the spot.....sorry boys, not all of us try to imitate the pro bass fisherman and wear the pfd's while driving and fishing, etc...if you wanna wear them, thats your choice though, if you want to knock me for saving a few bucks vs safety, then I'm guessing you guys get new boats every 3-4 years, as we all know the newest, most expensive boats are the safest....can I also assume that those who knocked for saving a few bucks treat fire extinguishers the same way......

    instead of going with the size rated for a boat, you guys have the wall mounts like they have in schools and other buildings??
     
  17. Orlando

    Orlando Set The Hook!

    FYI my boat is 13 years old and I have never tried to imitate anyone. Nothing wrong with trying to save a few bucks, I do it when I can. Sorry but I just cant agree with what you said "save a few bucks vs safety" Just trying to help you. Good fishing to you
     
  18. as for the ejection factor... im thinking of 2 things that can cause it to happen. 1.) your going way to fast in rough water wich would be your own stupidity or 2.) you hit the big brown break wall that you should of seen to begin with.
     

  19. Or


    MARBLEHEAD -- Life jackets and an emergency engine shut-off switch may have saved the lives of two fishermen thrown from a moving boat Friday near the lighthouse, U.S. Coast Guard officers said.
    The pair, who were competing in the BASS Sandusky Northern Open tournament, were and treated and released for injuries Friday morning at Magruder Hospital, said Kim Jessup, BASS spokeswoman.
    Aron Wessels, 35, Watervliet, N.Y., likely suffered a broken right rib, said Paul Gimple, petty officer for U.S. Coast Guard, Marblehead station. Mitchell Rhoton, 23, Indianapolis, had minor injuries, Gimple said.
    Both were wearing life jackets, Gimple said.
    "With that kind of injury, (Wessels) could have drowned without that life jacket," Gimple said. "These guys did exactly what they're supposed to do."
    The fishermen left the Sandusky boat launch at 6:30 a.m. aboard Wessels' 21-foot Triton bass boat, Jessup said. The vessel was traveling at 60 mph, a normal speed for sport-fishing boats, when its steering failed, said Petty Officer Shawn McNerney, who led the team that rescued the pair.
    The boat, which has an open top and no cabin, then made a sharp 90-degree turn and dumped the two into the lake, Gimple said.
    "There's nothing they could have done about it," Gimple said. "It doesn't seem like there was any kind of neglect on anyone's part in this."
    Wessels, who was driving, was wearing a kill switch, a device that clips the driver to the throttle. If the driver moves too far away from the steering wheel, the switch automatically turns off the engine and stops the boat, Gimple said.
    "Without it, it could have possibly run them over," McNerney said.
    An unidentified person who was near the lighthouse saw the accident and called 911 at 6:50 a.m., Gimple said. Coast Guard officers arrived at the scene seven minutes later, he said.
    Meanwhile, Greg Caine, 39, Fort Wayne, Ind., a Good Samaritan competing in the fishing tournament, picked up Wessels less than a mile off the Marblehead lighthouse, McNerney said. Rhoton swam back to the boat, which stayed upright, Gimple said.
    Caine told McNerney he saw a big blast of water in the air and knew something was wrong. Wessels was laying on the back of Caine's boat when Coast Guard officers arrived, McNerney said.
    "(Wessels) was shivering," McNerney said. "He was definitely shaken up. He could barely move."
    Caine and the officers went to nearby Bay Point Marina where officers wrapped Wessels in a blanket and used a splint to move him off the boat and into an ambulance, McNerney said.
    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft, anchored Wessels' boat by the light house and later took it to Sandusky, Gimple said. The craft, which had little damage, was released to Wessels Friday afternoon.
    Wessels, Rhoton and Caine could not be reached for comment.
    Coast Guard officers were very pleased with the rescue operation, Gimple said.
    The call for assistance came when they were getting dressed or in the shower, a difficult time to mobilize a team quickly, he said. They were out the door and in the rescue boat in four minutes, and the fishermen were on land in 35 minutes.
    "As the Coast Guard, we really strive for that," Gimple said.
    Originally published July 16, 2005