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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just moved into a house with a well, septic, softwner and "waterproofed" basement.


The pipes for the waterproofing, the water softener and the washer all drain into the sump pit and pump up into my septic.

I know this is not right, and that for many reasons need it redone. What kind of contractor would I contact about figuring out how to get the waterproofing water and softener discharge water somewhere outside of my house besides my septic?

The septic is brand new and don't want to wreck it.

Not sure if this is a plumber job or maybe bigger, as I may need major trenching and digging, etc.

I am in Green, btw. If anyone knows someone reliable and affordable, let me know.
 

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Am assuming you are in the county with a septic tank, although a "variance" is legal in a incorporated area in a few cases. Would have at least 2 LISENCED local plumbers come out and look at the situation and give you a free estimate. If you just bought the house "as is", you`re "stuck". Otherwise I would be VERY tempted to call the Housing Inspector (American Society of Housing Inspectors-ASHI) and realator, they are REQUIRED by law to follow rather strict minimum FEDERAL and STATE requirements as far as reporting SUB STANDARD plumbing "do it yourself" disasters. Many counties will NOT allow a "lift" pump on a main sewage line unless there is bedrock directly below the slab due to various concerns. UNLESS the ASHI inspector NOTED it and ENSURED it is in fact "LEGAL", it falls on back upon HIM for PASSING it. Not to try to imply that some housing inspectors are willing to accept "gratuities" under the table for ILLEGALLY ignoring serious issues with a house so the seller can AVOID costly repairs before dumping the house on an unexpected buyer, and then telling them "OH my!" It wasn`t like that when I SOLD it to you; it`s YOUR very expensive problem NOW..." BTW, the State has buyer protection laws where if major faults are discovered within a set period of time the sale of the house is declared "NULL and VOID" due to deceit on the part of the Realator and seller, and Ohio generally allows for "discomfort" fines to be awarded. That is WHY Realators and Housing Inspectors carry BIG insurance coverage...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you start cheap and just direct your roof runoff farther away from the house to reduce the water caught by the basement waterproofing? Your local laws might not allow you to discharge "gray water" from the washer that way.
I want the gray water from the washer to go into the septic system, not into the storm drain. The gutters drain out to the storm drain under the street, so directing roof water further is not going to help.

I had a home inspection, a septic and well inspection and a follow up by a county inspector as there were problems with the septic and it needed replaced. All three said the system in place was not illegal, but the amount of water going through the septic system was not ideal. The waterproofing water is not my biggest concern. I have been monitoring it and it does not amount to a large volume, and I would know after this last week or two.

I was told to run the water softener discharge to the storm drain by the home and septic inspectors. I would do that (and the waterproofing water )except there is a section of my downspout drain that is exposed to the open air and am concerned that the pipe would freeze in the winter and backup the softener.

So I may be looking at a French well or something like that. The problem was known when I bought the house, and so it is my responsibility.

So a plumber would be the best consult to begin with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Am assuming you are in the county with a septic tank, although a "variance" is legal in a incorporated area in a few cases. Would have at least 2 LISENCED local plumbers come out and look at the situation and give you a free estimate. If you just bought the house "as is", you`re "stuck". Otherwise I would be VERY tempted to call the Housing Inspector (American Society of Housing Inspectors-ASHI) and realator, they are REQUIRED by law to follow rather strict minimum FEDERAL and STATE requirements as far as reporting SUB STANDARD plumbing "do it yourself" disasters. Many counties will NOT allow a "lift" pump on a main sewage line unless there is bedrock directly below the slab due to various concerns. UNLESS the ASHI inspector NOTED it and ENSURED it is in fact "LEGAL", it falls on back upon HIM for PASSING it. Not to try to imply that some housing inspectors are willing to accept "gratuities" under the table for ILLEGALLY ignoring serious issues with a house so the seller can AVOID costly repairs before dumping the house on an unexpected buyer, and then telling them "OH my!" It wasn`t like that when I SOLD it to you; it`s YOUR very expensive problem NOW..." BTW, the State has buyer protection laws where if major faults are discovered within a set period of time the sale of the house is declared "NULL and VOID" due to deceit on the part of the Realator and seller, and Ohio generally allows for "discomfort" fines to be awarded. That is WHY Realators and Housing Inspectors carry BIG insurance coverage...

That is incredibly good information. U fortunately it was a known problem as I stated above. Thank you very much for the ideas though!
 

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Yes, call a plumber. You already addressed the county inspector and septic installers, a plumber should be able to get your issue squared away.
 

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Most contractors such as myself are required to register in the cities that they work and the cities can direct you to a registered contractor that does the type of work you need done. If trenching and digging will be needed then you're mostlikely going to need an excavating company, one that is licenced to do septic tank work. You could also call you local guy who cleans out your septic tank when needed, I'm sure he could steer you to a contractor that's licensed to do the job. I just had my house tied in to our new sewer system, before that I had a septic tank and like you my sump pump was pumping directly into my septic tank, which was nolonger up to code. The same guy (an excavating company fixed the entire mess in my basement....wasn't cheap.....but now aleast it's been done properly.
 

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Hopefully not opening a can of worms, but, my washer, and foundation drains,softner all go into the sump. From there, it goes through a pipe, (which is buried two or three feet) into the yard. Let me add, the pipe that is buried in the yard is drainage tile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dovans, from what I have gathered, with the exceptin of the washer, your setup would be correct for me. Unfortunately that is a good bit of work to have done as there is only one way out of the basement for me the way the house is set up.
 

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Do you have 2 sump pumps? If so grey water from washer goes to septic.
Water softener to perimeter sump. The brine water from the softener will not
freeze.




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