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What is the best lure for blue gill fishing

Discussion in 'Panfish Discussions' started by elyfishingmaster, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. elyfishingmaster

    elyfishingmaster Junior member

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    I seen something about the Bitsy minnow and i liked it a lot i was wondering if there is any other lures that work well.
     
  2. ....it depends. Gills can be caught on anything from chunks of hot dog to crankbaits. I would say that probably the most consistent producer of gills are pinmin-type jigs tipped with waxworms or maggots. But then again, it depends on the body of water, time of year, everything.

    Cold water/pre-spawn, stay small. 1/64 or 1/80 oz round leadhead jigs and a twister tail are great. Color of tail depends on what the fish want at whatever body of water.

    Pinmins/waxworm or maggot combos fished under a bobber work all year round and on most bodies of water.

    Bigger fish go deep in the Summer months, and I know at Portage Lakes, they sure like 1/32 oz jigs tipped with about a 1 to 2 inch chunk of nightcrawler...

    Bluegill will hit just about anything you throw in front of them, but to get better size and numbers, you need to get out and see what works at each individual body of water. You can read all you want here, but there's nothing like getting out, fishing, and figuring it out. Once you do that and see what works where and when, you'll be on your way to being a great fisherman.
     

  3. I USED TO FISH A POND IN NEW MIDDLETWN THAT HAD 12-13 IN GILLS IN IT.
    EVERYDAY ME AND MY FRIEND USED TO THROW SMALL 2IN RAPALAS AND HAVE A BLAST! AS I GREW UP INTO PIT FISHIN AND HAD TO FISH DEEPER FOR THEM I USED TUBES WITH MINNOW OR WAXXIES. BOBBER AND CRAWLER IN THE SHALLOWS. I DONT SEE MUCH OF THESE BIG GUYS IN THE RES BUT ALOT OF SUNS. :cool:
     
  4. LakeRaider

    LakeRaider EEEEEK!

    We use a 32oz.popeye , chartruese with red jighead tipped with a waxworm on two lb test non-floresant line at our lake year round. These are big bluegills and redears. Raider
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2015
  5. TexasRigged

    TexasRigged Lover of all things wet.

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    I like rooster tails for gills if its not weedy.
     
  6. Accidently discovered this many years ago. While netting minnows , my cousin and I discovered the net was full of immature crawdads. they were about as long as the width of your finger and almost a pale green. We dumped them into a box with a lid.Went to a local lake that has huge gills and decent crappies. After several hours of the crappies snubbing our minnows I decided to try a second rod with one of those baby craws. I tied on a # 10 hook with a teeny bobber and and proceeded to absolutely slay the bull gills. We nicknamed them brophys ( a trophy of a bluegill ).We kept about 50 for a family fish fry and released the rest. We also noticed that the smaller gills almost left them alone. Only problem is finding this bait all the time as they seem to be only available early in year. I suspect that its rightafter the crawdads eggs hatch and the predators havent had the time to really thin their numbers down. To pinpoint the size they were about as big as a freshwater shrimp (scuds ). whenever I am lucky enough to catch them I immediately change my target to bluegills and I am not often disappointed.
     
  7. Best lure, rebel wee craw by FAR.......

    BUT>>>>>>

    For the most and biggest bluegill ever, anywhere. Use a decent size hook and chunks of chicken liver. I have caught several frying pan size gills on them. I have tried this in all areas of OH same results. At rose lake when u can see the gills, i watched the big ones rush in and snag the liver before the lil ones even got a nibble.
     
  8. marcbodi

    marcbodi junior member

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    Hi,
    A single hook,split shot and half a nightcrawler.Cast out and retreve very slow and they will pick it up and run with it swallow it.
     
  9. I catch the majority of my Gills on tubes regardless of depth. I fish some very deep gravel pits that require a slip float, but it still works great. This method also usually catches a few bass and crappie as well.

    I use as small of float as possible, rigged to the desired lure depth. Many times I use no weight (especially during spring and fall - cooler temps), but for a faster approach I'll use a small split shot 10-12'' above the tube. Cast out and let the tube sink all the way. Next twitch and reel in 1-5 ft. intervals depending how deep you are fishing. After each 1-5ft interval, pause long enough to let the tube sink all the way down again. Repeat all the way to the boat. Simple, but very effective.

    This killed the white crappie @ Indian last spring.
     
  10. Mr.Bass.

    Mr.Bass. Banned

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    You cant beat a pin min. If that dosent work, like someone else said put a piece of nightcrawler on a 1/32 jig head.
     
  11. A tackle shop near me and probably halfway between JIG & me has some very tiny jigs and some very tiny curly tails. I have good luck with these in ponds and at the lake. Usually fish below a bobber and just wiggle it back to the boat.
     
  12. If you are fishing less than five feet of water, I'd put fly-fishing up against any other bait or lure. The only problem is that once you figure out if they want a nymph or a dry fly, you WILL be hauling in a bluegill every five seconds, so you have to weed through the dinks.

    Here's why I think flies work the best:
    1. Stealthy Presentation: Especially over clear or shallower water, there is no bobber or heavier lure to impact the water and spook fish (you don't have to wait for them to become comfortable again and return to the area to see your bait)
    2. Attractive Presentation: The small splash of a dry fly hitting the water will cause immediate recognition from any fish in the area.
    3. Topwater action almost all season: The usual weather conditions will affect this, but you can still catch fish subsurface.
    4. Long distance presentation of a lite lure. If you are using another lure (not bobber and bait combination) for panfish, chances are your casting distance is cut down. With a fly rod, you can throw a piece of fluff fifty feet.
    5. The lure is second only to the real thing in food source imitation: Dry flies aside, most fish will eat nymphs at any point in their life cycle (If you spend a season hauling in bluegill on nymphs, you are pretty much guaranteed a trophy largemouth, catfish and carp as a bonus). If you are using a dry fly, see number 2
    6. Fly casting in itself is fun.

    The only problem area of fly fishing is that you usually need a bit of clearance behind you to false cast. But, if you're only fishing eight feet off of shore, that's not a problem.

    You can use a dry fly a couple of feet behind a small bobber, reeling in slowly (so that the fly pushes a small ripple of water in front of it) if you don't have a fly rod handy. Try some small, cheap sponge bugs (they won't sink as easily as hair patterns).

    You will fish circles around everyone else. I believe if you perfect your nymph fishing skills, you can increase your catch rate even more (something I think about working on, but bluegill usually hit so readily on the surface, it's hard to do anything else).

    Sorry for the long post, but cabin fever has got me worked up. I believe that flies are the perfect method of catching bluegill, and bluegill are the perfect target for a fly rod.
     
  13. I started using a 1/32 ounce Geranimo jig with feathers tipped with wax worm underneath bobber was a great way to catch some gills. A bonus with this set-up is the fact that the jig will still attract them after the bait is gone. Caught a few bluegill on the jig without the wax worm. I like two color combinations from Wal-mart: pink head with white feathers and white head with green feathers.
     
  14. I just use my ice lures all year.
     
  15. I've always had fantastic luck with a just a floating rapala. Jerk it a little and let it rise. Drives 'em crazy around here!
     
  16. johnboy111711

    johnboy111711 SOLID MEAT

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    I keep it simple, a medium worm on a #8 gold aberdeen hook with a 1/4 oz split shot 12-18in above it. tightlined and slowly moving across the bottom.
     
  17. Ok, I have to ask, What do you mean by "pin min"? I'm pretty sure I know but would like some clarification. I've had the most luck with wax worms or roostertails.
     
  18. A pin min is the name of a panfish jig produced up here in NE Ohio. The name is used generically now. Basically, it's a very small 1/64 to 1/80 oz teardrop jig, and they come in every color of the rainbow.

    They do come in all sizes though. Go to the JAMMIN JIGS page and that's what they look like.
     
  19. Thanks, I'm glad I asked, I guess they haven't made it down here yet.
     
  20. Pharley

    Pharley Hook 'Em

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    I like Big Daddy's Pinmin/wax worm combo.

    Big Daddy was outfishing me 2 to 1, until I got in his tackle box and got a blue one. Then it was on.
     
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