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unidentifiable fish

Discussion in 'Northeast Ohio Fishing Reports' started by Deerehunter03, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. they look like oscars
     

  2. 100% Oscars i have one sitting in my aquarium behind me.

    It is unfortunately a common problem that they are released into wild cause they grow to full size in about 2 years and most people are not prepared to deal with there needs in a aquarium environment.
     
  3. I believe youhave a winner. 2 of them
     
  4. mishmosh

    mishmosh borderline newb

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    Will they survive the cold season?
     
  5. misfit

    misfit MOD SQUAD

    they are a tropical fish,and won't survive in water temps much under 60 degrees.
    they actually grow slower than that.the first 6 - 12 months they grow fairly fast,but growth slows and they actually rarely reach their potential length(about 16 inches) in aquariums.they do make great pets.
     
  6. Lewzer

    Lewzer Powderfinger

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    I've eaten a few of the red and tiger oscars. Some were mine and some were out of friend's aquariums. They have meaty fillets like swordfish. Good tasting fish.
     
  7. mishmosh

    mishmosh borderline newb

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    Dude!!! That's like eating your pets! I have a rockbass and bluegill in my basement but I sure as heck am not going to eat them when they get big! They have names even!
     
  8. Oscars............
     
  9. Mushijobah

    Mushijobah Urban Angler

    Haha sounds like something I would do too.
     
  10. oscars do taste ok!
    we fish for them every year in the everglades. they are great fighters and hits hard!
     
  11. Well then when they get big call me over and I'll eat them....;)
     
  12. Lewzer

    Lewzer Powderfinger

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    You wouldn't make a very good farmer would you????;) My HAD names too.:)
     


  13. Completely right i was just giving simple numbers my current oscar is about 13-14 inches long. He is just over 2 years that i have had him.

    I make a joke with everyone i go fishing with that its not a good fishing trip unless i catch a fish bigger than my Oscar.
     
  14. Pole Squeezer

    Pole Squeezer fishfinder1

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    Those Oscars are very agressive, they have been known to drive away bluegill from an area, they grow pretty big 12-20 inches, and will eat anything, worms, insect, berries, etc. You can almost catch more oscars than bluegills in some south florida canals. They were susposed to be sterile like talapia, but i think that has been proven wrong. If so, they would make one bad panfish is they and bluegill got crossed up into some type of hybrid. Maybe then they could survive up here.
     
  15. Oscars are south american chiclids, not AFRICAN. Raised in farm ponds in FL by commercial ornamental freshwater fish farms. They are NOT sterile, and can live anywhere that they can seek water not less than 60 degrees or so. Very aggessive,messy eaters and grow large, most are dumped by people unwilling to care for them when they get to large for their aquarium. Very unlikely that they have "hybridized" with a bluegill. Although their are several variations in the pet industry, including a true albino that is commonly for sale.

    Been in the pet industry for 20+ years, just thought i'd clarify things.
     
  16. castmaster00

    castmaster00 very avid fisherman

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    well then howare they surviving the winter?
     
  17. misfit

    misfit MOD SQUAD

    by living in warm southern lakes or warm northern aquariums:p :D
     
  18. Good call Misfit!!!..LOL Exactly, if they are living in the north, they are probably finding enough warm water somewhere to sustain them. Possibly a water output from a power plant or something like that. The most likely scenario is that they were dumped right after things got warm and they won't survive the winter. Most public aquariums and zoos will not take these fish when they get too big, so people constantly dump them into our rivers and lakes. Introducing new non-native species and possibly destroying that river or lake's ecosystem.