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hey all i was reading the dispatch this morning..and it stated that they had found toxic algae at buckeye.. but they claimed its not as bad as grand lake St.Marys... not sure what effects this has on the fish.. but it said that it can cause skin rash...make u sick and possibley kill small pets... so just a heads up to all of u who might be heading out there....


good luck today
 

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Doesn't surprise me and I wouldn't think that this would be new for buckeye as heavy as the alge growth is every year.
Not to start a debate but IMO buckeye lake fish have a strange taste to them that I believe is caused from living in that thick green pea soup water for 7 to 9 months a year. I had a couple of eyes from there and a couple of eyes from hoover this spring and even though they looked the same on the plate after being fried I could tell what ones was buckeye lake fish.
 

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"Toxic algae found in lake
Level in Buckeye Lake isn't as high as that in Grand Lake St. Marys
Thursday, July 16, 2009 3:15 AM
By Tim Magaw

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH
Ohio environmental officials have discovered toxic algae in Buckeye Lake.

The algae are called planktothrix, and they produce a neurotoxin called microcystin. In high levels, it can cause rashes, make you sick and kill small pets, including dogs.

The same blue-green algae was discovered in high concentrations in Grand Lake St. Marys in western Ohio in May.

Ohio Environmental Protection Agency officials say the levels in Buckeye Lake are lower and should not pose a threat to humans or animals.

But levels can fluctuate, as they have in Grand Lake. That troubles clean-water advocates.

"This is not a trivial organism to be discovering," said Joe Logan, agricultural director for the Ohio Environmental Council. "It's extremely harmful, extremely toxic and extremely worrisome."

Lake Erie has had toxic algae blooms for several years.

Grand Lake St. Marys was the first inland lake in Ohio where algae pose a health threat. The 13,000-acre lake has long been considered one of the state's most-polluted; fertilizers and manure from farms in Mercer and Auglaize counties have turned it green with algae.

The EPA also said it found low levels of microcystin in LaDue Reservoir in Geauga County.

"At this point, it's not necessary to post (warnings in LaDue and Buckeye Lake) as we did at Grand Lake St. Marys," said Linda Oros, a spokeswoman for the Ohio EPA.

The microcystin found at Grand Lake was four times higher than a limit the World Health Organization considers safe for swimming, and 82 times higher than the safe level for drinking.

Area drinking water is not threatened, Oros said.

Levels of the toxic algae in Grand Lake St. Marys have decreased, said Sean Logan, director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

But he also said the levels fluctuate and that the state will continue working with landowners about how they treat the land.

"We must do that," Logan said. "We cannot treat the watershed as it has been treated in the past."

Phosphorous runoff from pesticides, fertilizers and animal waste can cause the algae that produces the microcystin, said David Culver, who supervises Ohio State University's Limnology Lab.

"These organisms do very well in warm water, so they often show up in a lake this time of year," Culver said. The only way to eliminate these toxins is by eliminating runoff into the lake, he added.

George O'Donnel, a trustee for Buckeye Lake for Tomorrow, said there are other pollution concerns, including old septic systems.


"The correction process is not going to take place quickly," he said.

The testing is part of an on-again, off-again state inland lake program created to monitor the health of Ohio waterways.

Pressed by funding cuts and its own emphasis on stream pollution, the Ohio EPA abandoned routine inland-lake testing in 1995.

Though the state's monitoring program was resurrected last year, there are more questions than answers concerning the 400 public lakes in Ohio. Additional budget cuts could doom the program again.

Scientists sampled two other inland lakes at the same time as Buckeye Lake. Oros said no traces of the toxic algae were found in Lake Loramie and Indian Lake.

[email protected] "
 

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and from yesterday's news(there are 20-30 million septic systems in the U.S., more than 30% don't work properly).

"NEWS BRIEFS
Wednesday, July 15, 2009 3:05 AM


COLUMBUS
Septic system rules lost in budget shuffle
Lawmakers now have less than six months to work out the differences between competing ideas over how the state should regulate home septic systems.

Lost in the tussle over the state budget, work on a compromise between competing Senate bills on the subject stalled before the end of the legislative season.

Both bills would have toughened the state's regulation of home septic systems, but Sen. Timothy Grendell, a Republican from Chesterland in northeastern Ohio, said a bill introduced by fellow Republican Sen. Tom Niehaus, of New Richmond in southwestern Ohio, would be too costly for many Ohio homeowners.

Niehaus said his bill was the result of more than a year of study by a task force made up of state health officials, environmental agencies and sewage experts.

The group determined the provisions were necessary to protect the public health.

When no compromise was reached, an existing moratorium on new sewage legislation that was set to expire July 1 was extended for two years as part of Senate's version of the state budget.

That moratorium was reduced to just more than five months, until Jan. 1, 2010, as a provision in the compromise budget bill approved Monday.

Both senators had said the two-year moratorium was too long, and could have kept the bills from getting needed attention when the legislative season resumes in the fall.

-- Josh Jarman [email protected]"
 

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some people wonder how legitimate threads can turn on a dime,and take on a whole new personality............................................well,here's a prime example........
And here's Andyman on his soapbox:
I think sportsmen have been mislead. The threat of "taking away our guns" is used as a scare tactic to politically mislead us.
no matter what the subject,some people just cannot resist the opportunity to climb up on their soapbox to promote their personal agenda.i'm having a hard time seeing the correlation is between the nra and toxic algea on buckeye lake:confused:
as further proof of how one post like that can distract from the original topic,i present exhibit b...............
add pawn shop guys, and pay day loan places.
now we've gone from toxic algea to gun control to pawn shops and loan companies to banking practices:confused:

that said,all hijacks have been removed,in an effort to get things back on track.so please keep it there.
 

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question to those who keep and eat fish from buckeye:

will this information affect the amount of fish you keep and eat from buckeye?
 

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i doubt it will have any impact on what i keep.but then lately,that's been very little anyway:(
 

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Won't have any effect what so ever on my eating saugeye from buckeye lake.
Buckeye ,being the first & oldest state park in Ohio has always went through this year in and year out.Nothing new here with this ,same ole,same ole.It's the lake's general makeup that contributes to this so called problem.it's an old feeder lake to it's old canal system.It was never meant to be a resevoir supplying water to a large municipality,as a result it's shallow so algae is gonna grow in it.I just stop fishing there during late July,August,Sept each year.When fall arrives,the algae dies till next year and the whole process is repeated again next year.I just accept the bad along with the good.Also BUckeye is alot cleaner today than say 20 years ago when septic tanks lined it's shores ,all of which are illegal today within a certain distance from the lake,so it's a far safer and cleaner lake than years gone by.But still Buckeye gets a bad rap from a lot of people as being a nasty,dirty,cesspool lake.If you feel that way ,good for you ,go else where and leave the eyes for we that do fish Buckeye & eat her offerings,more for us.:D
 

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Apologies to the board....I guess.

I honestly didn't see my response as a highjacking, but adding information to the topic. (And that quote is grossly out of context.)
His topic was "Toxic Algae found in Buckeye Lake", so I began to ellaborate on HOW it got there, and WHAT we could do about it.

Sincere apologies for the detour to the author.
 

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I may have missed this somewhere as I did not go through every post but my question is, is the algae going to affect fishing or is it just scientifically not known yet?
 

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i didn't see anything that would effect fishing at this point.
 

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I'm going to make another attempt at my point, as it very much pertains to the ORIGINAL point of a toxic algae bloom.
(Please bear with me Rick and seperate my opinion from the forum rules)

The original post suggests that this algae may effect the fishing, cause skin rashes, makes pets sick, etc...

I am suggesting this: That we, as sportsmen, should try to seprate ourselves from the immediate/how's this effect ME type of questions like "Will the fshing suffer?"....but instead concentrate on the bigger picture questions of WHY.

Like why is toxic algae growing in our lakes and water supplies?
How did it happen?
How do we fix it?

If we never get around to addressing the issues of why, I'm fairly certain that indeed the fishing and such will suffer in the long run; not to mention the public health issues involved in a water supply.

puterdude suggested that the design and shallowness of the lake is teh cause, which is partlly true. The shallow environment certainly allows for this to happen, but it is not the CAUSE. The cause is from what's being dumped INTO the lake. Evidenced by the improvement in the lake once the septic systems and chemical applications were improved.
The linked article explains as much.

So how does it get improved? Either by volunteer clean up or through legislation, plain and simple is people have to stop dumping bad stuff in the lake.
And most likely corporations are not going to voluntarily improve their discharge into lakes/rivers, it almost always has to be legislated.

So, in my opinion, in order to remedy such situations, we need to vote for representatives who not only cater to sportsmen in the campaign speeches, but also vote for improving our envrionment once in office.
I also beleive we need to volunteer in organizations who support our local environments as many success stories began in grass roots groups of less than 10 people.

My quote you chose above, was simply referring to the point that our issues as sportsmen are far deeper than just gun laws, like why is toxic algae growing in our lakes at 82 times the maximum levels for drinking?
 

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now that's much better and actually gives food for thought.though i agree with your thoughts on the effects of corperate policies and the need for legislation pertaining to pollution in the big picture,we can't blame everything on the corperate goons.
and i wonder if the same tests that exposed the problem at buckeye were done in past years.if so,why is it just now being discovered?since many of the problems you mentioned have been addressed going back several years(as you noted)there must be some other cause(s)for the the problem,unless it took decades to become evident,which i don't think is the case.so it leads me to believe there must be some other underlying factors.

as for this
Please bear with me Rick and seperate my opinion from the forum rules
as i've mentioned many times,i never have a problem with opinions unless the manner in which they are given is unacceptable and detract from the true purpose of this site.
 

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and i wonder if the same tests that exposed the problem at buckeye were done in past years.if so,why is it just now being discovered?since many of the problems you mentioned have been addressed going back several years(as you noted)there must be some other cause(s)for the the problem,unless it took decades to become evident,which i don't think is the case.so it leads me to believe there must be some other underlying factors.
This is another one of many "temperature" related environmental problems. Some might suggest our average mean temperture/latitude is increasing.
For the same reasons that there are now more Buckeye trees in Michigan than Ohio, and the same reasons that kudzu grows in areas farther north than ever before...maybe those same reasons are exacerbating some existing problems in our lakes...and oceans....and land....and rivers.

In addition, and I have no first hand knowledge of Buckeye lake, but I do on Grand Lake (which is mentioned in the author's linked article.)
The situation at Grand Lake existed for many years before it became public knowledge. It was surpressed as the lake generates a significant amount of tourism dollars. (Kind of like in Jaws when the mayor didn't want to close the beach)
The state of Virginia is doing the exact same thing right now with the Shenandoah river and this toxic algae. I've seen the actual reports showing CRAZY levels and the dangers of swimming, much less digesting the water, meanwhile the state is spending LOTS of money on advertising letting people know that the river "is back" and safe.

Again, I have absolutely no first hand knowledge about the situation at Buckeye, but it's reasonable to think that an article like the one posted may effect someone's bank account (good, hard working bar, restaraunt, marina owners, etc...) and therefore sometimes government agencies may make decisions and share information based on how it may effect a group as opposed to the collective community.
 

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Went down to buckeye tonight and it's not even green yet.... looked better than most years.
we can't blame everything on the corperate goons
I'll be good,:D
 

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Won't have any effect what so ever on my eating saugeye from buckeye lake.
Buckeye ,being the first & oldest state park in Ohio has always went through this year in and year out.Nothing new here with this ,same ole,same ole......But still Buckeye gets a bad rap from a lot of people as being a nasty,dirty,cesspool lake.If you feel that way ,good for you ,go else where and leave the eyes for we that do fish Buckeye & eat her offerings,more for us.:D
With all due respect, this is not same ole, same ole. Neither is this some kind of passive aggressive attack on your favorite fishing lake.
This isn't the Alum guys saying Buckeye sucks.

"This is not a trivial organism to be discovering," said Joe Logan, agricultural director for the Ohio Environmental Council. "It's extremely harmful, extremely toxic and extremely worrisome."

Do some research on the Shenendoah river valley and see what's hapening there....or just go and drink a glass of water from the tap in Celina, OH.
Ask those people if they wish they had given more of a crap when they first heard or wish they had reacted sooner.
Ask them if they would swim with a small cut... or let their dog grab a drink from the lake on a hot day.

Your reaction is ironic. If Buckeye was my favorite fishing destination, this would be my top priority.
The good news is there are people out there that will make this a priority.
 

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My opinion for what it's worth is much more attention or testing is being done now than in the past.I think if test would have been done 20 to 30 years ago in the month of July people would have ran from Buckeye Lake.I think it's all a natural reaction to higher temps and normal algae growth annually this time of year.Farm land around the lake has and will continue to shrink as the populations continue to grow from Columbus eastward.I do think more chemical are available to farmers to squeze every bushel out of an acre and that could cause a slight increase in toxcity levels but I still think with the reductions of available farm land it all probably evens out in the end.So in the end I feel we are a lot more aware or concerned today than years ago.So whats the fix?Can't dig the lake deeper as cost prevents that,control the chemicals that farmers put down?I think we all are more conscience of our waterways today than years ago and try to help keep them clean,maybe ride the butts of those whom don't.I don't think theres a quick fix if a fix exists at all as I still think it's a natural annual occurance on Buckeye but just more talked about today.
 

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Do you simply disregard the science, the testing, and the data from people who make a living studying such things?
Do you not see similar temperature related anomalies going on in our world?
Do you disregard your fellow fisherman who says he can determine a fish from Buckeye by taste?

I have a very good friend who is an aquatic biologist for the state of Pennsylvania. A couple years ago he was in town and we did some fishing for a few days. We showed him alot of different water.
One afternoon we took him to the Licking river and within 10 minutes he says "This river is jacked up. No bugs."
I of course pointed out all the nice fish we were catching.
And then I received a long lesson in what makes water healthy.

I suggest that when the fishing starts to suffer to the point where it's noticable to the average fisherman, it may be too late.
 

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I found the correlation with St. Mary's algae levels and the phosphorous levels paired with the amount of fertilizer levels very interesting. Is it a coincidence that St. Mary's is literally surrounded by hundreds of square miles of farmland around its many feeder creeks and rivers (not to mention the lake itself) and it right now is having the biggest problem with these algae blooms due to increased phosphorous and fertilizer levels found in the water? These blooms at buckeye should be monitored more closely for the next few years (if they occur) to see if this is just an odd year or there is a possibility of it becoming a problem. As for St. Mary's something has got to be done.
 

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My opinion for what it's worth is much more attention or testing is being done now than in the past.I think if test would have been done 20 to 30 years ago in the month of July people would have ran from Buckeye Lake.I think it's all a natural reaction to higher temps and normal algae growth annually this time of year.
Hmmmm Are you suggesting that attention to water quality and testing are new ideas? Or that we didn't have the science back then?

Just so everyone understands, water issues and testing in Ohio is even older than me. It is well documented and the science was as sound back then as it is today.
There were also newspapers in the 50's and 60's that most adults read everyday.

Know that the water at Buckeye lake has been tested for decades, by professionals with no bias.

"The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Water, maintains a statewide data base of more than 700,000 well logs. The Ground-Water Resources Section of the Division manages this valuable data base, which includes some information collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA). Since 1948, well log information has been collected to increase the understanding of the ground-water resources in Ohio. Geologists and hydrogeologists continue to study the state's ground-water resources, and as a result, Ohio is one of only a few states that has been completely mapped for ground-water availability (mapped by river basin, from 1959 to 1962)."

"Standards to control industrial pollution in the Ohio River were first adopted in 1955 (Vicory and Weaver 1984). The discharge of some toxic substances began to be restricted by law in 1958, and acid mine drainage was required to be treated beginning in I960...."

"The first improvement in the water quality of the industrialized Ohio River came with the introduction of sewage treatment in the 1940s and 1950s. In the 1940s, mean monthly dissolved oxygen concentrations were recorded
well below minimum accepted standards in low flow months."

" Early in the 1970's, the Ohio Division of Water realized the need to distribute basic ground water availability information to the general public in an easy to use, semi-technical format."

"The National Center for Water Quality Research (NCWQR) has been collecting and testing surface water in Ohio since 1974. Throughout the history of the Ohio Tributary Monitoring Program, over 100,000 samples collected from rivers and streams that drain over 50% of the land area of Ohio have been analyzed for sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and metals"

"In its early stages the Division of Water was primarily focused on research and information. The Division was given the responsibility to formally inventory water resources in all watersheds throughout the state, a task which was to take 10 years. Data were gathered from automatic stream gauges in operation on roughly 200 streams, and sedimentation of reservoirs was measured. Chemical and silt-load analyses were made on many streams in order to assess suitability of the water for human consumption, agriculture and industrial use. The Division operated automatic gages in wells and logged ground water level fluctuations. Flood and drought frequencies, along with their associated flows, were determined by analyzing stream-flow records. Results of these investigations were made available through Water Bulletins, and beginning in 1959, the Division published a series of Water Resources Inventory Reports by basin. Regional Water Plans for all five planning regions of the state were also developed. Throughout the coming years, the Division of Water retained its role of collecting and analyzing information about Ohio's water resources, but program activities specifically involving water quality (chemical analysis, etc.) were transferred to the Ohio EPA in 1972, shortly after it was created. However, several additional programs were also created within or transferred to the Division of Water."
 
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