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Tomatoes

Discussion in 'Home & Garden' started by bobk, Feb 23, 2017.

  1. bobk

    bobk

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    I know several on here had tomato issues last year. What's the game plan for this year to help eliminate the problem again?

    I'm going to give them more space, mulch right away to keep the moisture off the leaves and I have my fungicide to apply. I'll plant them in a different raised bed as well. Anything else you guys are doing to help stop the disease potential?
     
  2. Drip Irrigation or Ground Level Watering ONLY
    Continuous addition of Calcium to prevent Black Spot Disease
    Continual Pruning of lower leaves & yellowing leaves
     

  3. s.a.m

    s.a.m

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    lime time!
     
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  4. Lazy 8

    Lazy 8 Uncle Timbo.....commercial seed trader......

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    As I've said here in the past, my dad would dig his hole for the tomato plant which was deep enough to bury 3/4 of the entire plant, and throw a handful of lime in the hole.
    John was also right to keep up with the calcium. Pulverized lime is cheap. Try not to have to use chemicals if you can keep from it. In a round-a-bout way, you kind of end up eating them. Try to go organic if at all possible. You are what you eat. Monsanto can take a hike.
     
  5. Gonna give my "black thumb" a rest this year.:rolleyes:
     
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  6. bobk

    bobk

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    Good info guys. Stopping at the grain mill tomorrow to get some lime and fertilizer.
     
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  7. Lazy 8

    Lazy 8 Uncle Timbo.....commercial seed trader......

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    All natural. Just the way Mother Nature intended. (And your health)
     
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  8. My tomatoes did good last year until around the middle of August when they got hit with the late blight. I ordered some seeds this year, Plum Regal and Mountain Merit, that are supposed to be highly resistant to both early and late blight. I'm going to plant two beds of tomatoes. One bed will have Roma's and Beefstake and the second bed will have the Plum Regal and Mountain Merit. I've lived in my house for 29 years and I've had a garden every year. Last year was the first time that I had a late blight. There's no guarantee that I'll get a late blight again this year but if I do I'll be able to see how these tomatoes hold up. I use my grass clippings in my beds and I water with soaker hoses so I don't have any other issues with my tomatoes.
     
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  9. Saugeye Tom

    Saugeye Tom River Pilgrim & Sojourner

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    Gonna mulch or straw around them this year....heavy
     
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  10. bobk

    bobk

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    I will be mulching heavy this year as well.
     
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  11. All you need is a $3.99 bag of pelletized lyme. Spread it now so that it can start to release into the soil, it is a slow process.
     
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  12. ress

    ress

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    Hit up your local coffee shop in the morning for their grounds. They are free at starbucks. Mix in with soil. Add some peat moss and keep soil damp once it gets hot out.
     
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  13. Here's what I mulch with: www.bullcountrycompost.com. I get it by the pickup load. Natural fertilizer and the mulching helps with the blight
     
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  14. Lewzer

    Lewzer Powderfinger

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    This is very important! You want air circulation at the bottom of the plant.
     
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  15. buckeyebowman

    buckeyebowman On the back 9 and loving it!

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    All good tips above. I have never had the blight, but I move my tomato plants every year. At least I knew to do that. I have had blossom end rot however, which is a real heartbreaker! You have big, beautiful tomatoes on the plant, and just before they start to color up, they go black from the bottom up.

    The local radio show "gardening guy" straightened me out. Put AT LEAST half of the tomato plant in the hole, maybe with a Tums snapped in half. Mulch the plant in well. I've used "Sweet Peet" and composted cow manure. Both worked well. If you hit a dry spell, keep the plants watered regularly. One year we hit a drought. I'd look at the plants every day, but waited until I could see them wilting before dumping a bunch of water on them. The plants would perk back up, but they have a reaction to that kind of stress which blocks their ability to take in calcium, which brings on the blossom end rot.

    Don't be afraid to prune extraneous growth on your tomatoes, especially down low. Keep the area under your plants clean. If you have a hard rain, go look at the lower branches and leaves. If they have dirt on them, prune them out! This helps eliminate disease from "splash up".

    This takes some work, but it's worth it. The year the blossom end rot hit me hard I was losing maybe 7 or 8 out of 10 tomatoes to it! Tips from the gardening guy enabled me to turn that around to where I was harvesting probably 7 out of 10. This basically involved regular watering and force feeding the plant calcium.
     
  16. I keep a pair of scissors next to my tomato plot in order to readily pinch, sucker, prune & clean up the plants. I'm constantly seeing suckers, yellow leaves, blotchy lower branches, etc.
     
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  17. MikeG1

    MikeG1

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    Never water the surface of the ground. Instead, drill a couple 1/4 holes in the bottom of a deep plastic jug and bury the jug as deep as possible next to the plant. When it's time to water, just fill the jug. The water will slowly release through the holes to the roots of the plants. It should take about 10 minutes for the water to drain. If the jug stops draining, just take an awl and poke a few new holes in the jug bottom.

    This watering trick works extremely well for me. It saves water and gets the water directly to the roots where it's needed. It also helps with to stop fungus from growing under the plant.

    I've also seen 2" pvc pipe used for this purpose. The pipe is driven next to the plant and filled with water when needed. The water seeps from the bottom of the tube into the root area and the pipe is used as the tomato stake.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
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  18. bobk

    bobk

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    I like the pvc pipe tip. I may have to try that one.
     
  19. Flathead76

    Flathead76 Carp53.65

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    I'm going to buy mine at the farmers market.
     
  20. buckeyebowman

    buckeyebowman On the back 9 and loving it!

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    Heard another tip from the radio gardening guy. If you have to water, and your tomato plant is 2 feet tall, it will need 2 Gallons of water, 3 feet tall, 3 Gallons. I think many people under water when watering is necessary. You need a really good root soak!

    Another note about pruning. Last year I started taking some larger branches off my tomato plants. The determining factors were either how many flowers were on the branch, or if it already had hung fruit, how much? If you have a large branch carrying a lot of foliage but only a couple of flowers or small tomatoes, get rid of it! Allow the growth to go to the more productive parts of the plant.
     
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