Tiger Muskie

Discussion in 'Muskie & Pike Discussions' started by TeamPlaker, Sep 27, 2008.

  1. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    Hey all....
    Are there any lakes in Ohio that stock Tigers?
     
  2. not anymore, they switched over to pures a while back. if your looking for other esox sp. I can give you some places.
     

  3. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    Sure! I would like to plan a trip in the spring to try and get a Tiger. I just would like to know where they are so I can research the lakes and see what the guides go for.
     
  4. the cold water chain of likes Coldwater Michigan has some ,,real hard to get them,,on the Quincy end ,Marble lake I have seen many caught
     
  5. do you want to travel?

    WI has many Tiger lakes, some stocked, some natural reproduction.
     
  6. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    I'll travel far if the odds are decent. I was hoping for a place in a neighboring state like Kentucky, but I am planning vacation to Wisconsin in the spring, location is undetermined.
     
  7. Tigers, owing to their northern pike heritage, don't tolerate warm water as well as pure strain muskies. However, they're easier (& cheaper) to tank raise because they'll eat pelletized food instead of live fish.

    It's also a known that they don't reproduce & can't overrun an existing fishery which serves to appease the "they're eating all my crappies/walleyes/bass guys." (I've heard that OH briefly stocked Acton w/tigers!)

    There are tigers available in the Madison (WI) lakes but I don't know if these are natural or stocked. 3 of the top 10 tigers ever recorded, including #'s 1 & 2, were caught in Lac Vieux Desert, on the WI/MI border. They naturally reproduce in there & many are caught each year. Several other lakes in that area also have populations of varying significance.

    There is also a stocked impoundment in CO that is now kicking out nice fish.

    Decent odds? Come on, we're talking about musky fishing, right?
     
  8. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    Sounds good, I'll have to check into that.

    Decent odds to me are making my 10,000 casts instead of 100,000. :)
     
  9. We were up at Lake St. Clair 2 months ago and think we may caught a tiger. Kevin L. is holding it in the pics

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Last year I was fishing with Vc1111 at West Branch and he may have caught one there also. This one may be a Barred musky also. The markings are similar looking on the back but a bit different on the sides.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    John
     
  10. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    From what I understand, Tigers are supposed to have a rounded tail. I don't know enough about muskie yet to correctly identify them... only what I've studied in books.
    Either way you slice it, those are beautiful fish.
     
  11. MuskieJim

    MuskieJim Trophy Tamer

    Tiger muskies occur naturally when a northern pike fertilizes musky eggs. The tail really does not differ in a tiger muskie. There are a few PA rivers and watersheds that are stocked with tigers. Check the PA state fishing site to get that info.

    If you're going to take a trip just to catch tigers, I recommend Pineview Reservoir in Utah. It is the #1 tiger muskie lake in the country, constantly pumping out 50" tigers. They have been stocked there for the past 15 years or so.
     

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  12. TeamPlaker

    TeamPlaker Fishing Deadbeat

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    Thanks all for the info... several places to look into. Now I just have to research them and check out the guides.
     
  13. Sorry to correct you Jim, but the largest tiger out of Pineview UT was a 49". Thats the state record. Pineview is a good bet to catch mutiple tigers in a day, with some people catching up to 10 in 8hrs! 4 footers are not uncommon, but 50 inchers are extremely rare anywhere!
     
  14. MuskieJim

    MuskieJim Trophy Tamer

    Hmmm. I read an article in MH last year that had a couple fish over 50 inches that were posted in pics. Here was one of the photos that I found on MH's website that said it was a 50 incher from Pineview....
     

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  15. Hey Teamplaker, Wisconsin has an open and close season on musky. I believe it runs from the closet saturday to memorial day to the end of november. I have seen many caught in that state but never landed one myself. And i AM WELL OVER MY 10,000 CAST LOL, but will keep going after them whenever I have the chance. Good luck
     
  16. CORRECTION!!!!!! Insert foot in mouth!!!! Two documented 50inch fish have been caught from Pineview. One of which is the largest tiger ever released! A real monster at 53 1/4 inches by Ray Johnson in 1998. The other was a 51 incher caught by Kay Moore on June 19, 2007. She released this fish and Larry Ramsell told her it was one of the top 35 hybrids ever caught in the U.S. However, the current UT state record holding fish is a beastly 49inch x 33lb10oz tiger from Pineview caught in July 2006. I had to consult my December/January issue of Musky Hunter (pgs62-65) after my earlier post. *******Kay Moore is a woman and Ray Johnson is African American. So Jim, that picture you posted here is a farce.*******
     
  17. MuskieJim

    MuskieJim Trophy Tamer

    Well the picture is definately from Pineview, you can tell from the background. What size do you think the one is in the photo? Definately upper 40s
     
  18. Definately mid to upper 40's Jim. Those colors are amazing! They look a lot like some other muskies we know about!!! wink wink
     
  19. Jim- that other musky pic from this thread(from st clair) is definately a tiger! Those juveniles really are beutiful. The other fish from west branch is not a tiger. It looks like the juvenile(barred muskie) we trolled up last November near the Rock springs causeway.
     
  20. ShutUpNFish

    ShutUpNFish FishBum

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    None of those first four fish are tigers. The following two are. Many times, a young barred strain muskie may look like a tiger. The way to tell is by looking and the tail, which is much like that of a northern and the markings around the face and gill plate. Color is also usually a give away....the color of a tiger will be a silvery grey with leopard type spots around the face and the fins that distinct redish hue with darker spots. Tigers also usually do not have that irredescent green on the sides like a barred or clear strained muskie. However, the Great Lakes spotted strain is usually a dead give away.