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The Big Freeze

Discussion in 'Central Ohio Fishing Reports' started by Hooch, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. Hooch

    Hooch Fare Thee Well!

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    With the sudden cold temps. arriving, I wonder what effect it will have on the all of the resevoirs in regards to freezing and the dropping water levels?
    Will there be the possibility of 20 feet between the ice and the lake when all is said and done? -Hooch-
     
  2. Bassnpro1

    Bassnpro1 OSU outdoorsman

    the ice shouldn't form as long as the lake is constantly dropping. If the drop is paused however that could cause some problems. I beleive the same thing happened last year with a bunch of rain followed by a big freeze, and it didn't seem to cause many problems other than muddy water at least on the lakes that i hit.
     

  3. I am merely speculating here myself. As long as the water is dropping then the ice would separate itself from the water at some point if it could support itself. At that point then there would be no water in contact with the thin layer to build on. Therefore it would collapse. It seems to me that even if it does begin to form solid ice it will not be able to hold itself up off the water until it reaches extremes thicknesses. Therefore I would think that it would continue to collapse the ice as the water level goes down. So I think the only way it would pose a problem is like Bassnpro1 said, if it were kept at one level long enough to form a THICK ice buildup.
     
  4. Hooch

    Hooch Fare Thee Well!

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    I know they are letting water out of Delaware, but that's because they HAD to! But what about Alum Creek? It should be forming a good layer of ice by now, and let's say they start dropping the lake at the end of this week?
     
  5. It seems to me that it would take an awful lot of ice to suspend itself. But perhaps in cove areas where it has less distance to span that could happen. What I can picture is some pretty messed up looking ice along the shorelines as it collapse and re-freezes over and over.