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Smallie Rod help???? (St. Croix)

Discussion in 'Tackle Talk' started by fishingcubs, Jul 11, 2005.

  1. I'm looking for 2 new rods go with my shimano stradic fishing reals. I got the Bass Pro combos with both reals, so obviously the rods are crap. I have St. Croix on both of my bait casters, and have been looking at those, but I'm not sure which ones to get. Should I get a medium or medium light for my main smallie rod? I'll mainly be fishing tubes and doing some cranking with it. I am just going to get a light rod for my smaller real, but could use help on that too.
    Go Cubs.
     
  2. Banker

    Banker Banned

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    I'd go medium-light.....more fun.....actually I'd go light action but I'm sure some of the hard-cores will disagree....maybe even go as far to say medium-heavy......dunno....
     

  3. Ultralight

    Ultralight Crupi Wannabe

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    My thoughts would be medium light.

    Personally I fish an ultralight setup for smallie fishing in the rivers - I think it is a blast. Never really have problems with hook sets as river smallmouth tend to hit my crankbaits pretty hard and hook themselves up well. A 2 pounder can be a fun fight on an ultralight with 2-4 lb. test.

    As far as smallmouth fishing on a bigger body of water such as Erie - I'd probably go medium.

    Don't know much about St. Croix but I hear mixed reviews on these boards about their durability...Not quite sure why the Bass Pro Combo rods would be crap?? If you don't want them, I'll take them off your hands...
     
  4. bronzebackyac

    bronzebackyac Crick Smallie Fisherman

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    Medium action is a good all around rod to go with. It is stout enough that you can throw deep diving cranks and light enough you can throw small lures and jigs. I just bought a st.croix light weight fast action and the thing broke in two the first time I used it. I was a little upset. I did like the feel though. Was lucky enough to catch one 13" smallie before it broke.
     
  5. Ultralight

    Ultralight Crupi Wannabe

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    What's up with these St. Croix rods breaking? Shoot - I've been fishing an ultralight Shakespeare Cirrus with an el cheapo Shakespeare reel and seem to still catch fish without any problems...
     
  6. I have 4 or five bass pro rods and have no problems with them at all. Sure they aren't St. Croix or G Loomis rods...but then again, I am $500 richer because they aren't :)
     
  7. Maybe I'm wrong about the Bass Pro rods. I was told by the guys behind the fishing counter there that they were crap. I believed them since the real was $119 by itself, but the combo goes for $129.99 and 139.99 during the sales. I figured there must be some truth to the tail due to the tiny price jump. I also don't have a ton of sensitivity with my Woo Daves tube/finess Bass Pro Rod........ Did I really just write that all out?
     
  8. easternflyfisher

    easternflyfisher BassHaveOvertaken

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    take a look at the Rapala Long cast rods. i picked one up a few weeks ago, and its a really nice rod for 40$. 6ft medium action. i almost went with med-lt but they didnt have enough backbone for me.
     
  9. For Lake Erie smallmouth, I prefer the 6 to 6.5 foot medium action St. Croix spinning or baitcaster. For stream or river, I would go with 6 foot medium light.

    I don't believe in ultra light on smallmouth or any fish of that fighting capability as the UL tires them too much and the excessive build-up of latic acid can be deadly to the fish. Just my opinion.

    I have several St. Croix rods and have never had one break. I feel that most breaks by an angler of any manufacturer of quality rods is caused by the owner. It is easy to nick a rod without knowing it if you are not careful, and that will lead to a break. Many failures are due to continual use of heavier lures than the rod is rated for. Some time ago there was a post knocking St.Croix and the individual noted that he was using a 3/8 ounce rated rod to jig and cast 1/2 to 3/4 ounce jigs for walleye. Was that the fault of the rod?
    Too many individuals are unwilling to admit that the failure might be related to something they have done either knowingly or unknowingly.

    Many less costly rods have more fiberglass and less graphite in their construction and tolerate rough use better than the more costly rods that have a higher graphite content. The higher glass content also provides less sensitively.

    Too say that a major manufacture of quality rods produces junk is a comment that simply does not warrant consideration as being an overall observation based on a single instance.

    If you want a rod that can be tossed in the bed of a pickup or left to bounce around in the boat when motoring in rough water then invest in an Ugly Stick. I don't believe there is a better rod for the money than an Ugly Stick which has stood the test of time and served many fishermen well.
     
  10. Ultralight

    Ultralight Crupi Wannabe

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    How does an ultralight tire the fish out too much compared with a medium or medium light? Perhaps the fight is shorter, but by how much? Probably a few seconds. It doesn't take me considerably longer to reel in a fish on my ultralight compared to medium action...

    I'm not quite sure that the fish is going to fight less because the angler is using a heavier rod - the angler just doesn't feel the fight as much.

    There have been studies cited on various internet sites that say bass species do not have the muscular makeup that allows them to fight for extended periods of time to the point where lactic acid in the blood may begin to denature proteins...Apparently some trout species and many saltwater species are subject to this...I can't find any published scientific studies though...

    Now you've got me thinking I'm a fishkiller! But as was stated, this was an opinion - I'm just curious if there are any facts regarding bass species and lactic acid induced death...

    All of the smallmouth I've caught with my ultralight keep fighting and flailing even after I've landed them and they take right off as soon as they get released. They don't seem worn out at all and have never shown signs of being near death...

    Does this also mean I shouldn't make long casts, because the fish might have to fight for a longer time before it is landed? Or I shouldn't fish deeper water for the same reason?

    I think ultralight fishing is a blast, especially for fighting fish like Sallys, but I don't want to release them to die...

    Steve
     
  11. Banker

    Banker Banned

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    As far as stressing/hurting a smallie/any other fish I think there are pros and cons to both stiff and ultralight rods. Lets consider the two extremes.

    1. A 2X4. The smallie would have more of a chance of damaging its mouth when fighting as there's no give.

    2. A noodle. The smallie would overally be more fatigued by the time it made it in.

    I'm not gonna get into it....
     
  12. Banker

    Banker Banned

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    of course that's a generalization assuming all other variables (like drag) held constat...
     
  13. Banker

    Banker Banned

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    in either case (musky fishing on ultralight or bluegill fishing with a heavy duty saltwater pole), I don't think killing a fish due to poor rod selection is ever really an issue....I do not have any experience on Erie or with fish much bigger than 6 or 7 lbs......hopefully someday I can say the opposite....usually the fish die for other reasons (swallowing lure, being reeled up from the depths too quick, etc)....
     
  14. sowbelly101

    sowbelly101 Keep'n It Reel

    cant go wrong with them,

    fyi, i moved your most here for more specific viewing.

    thanks
    sowbelly :D
     
  15. peon

    peon account delete

    i use a 6'6 med. spinning and a 7" med. heavy baitcast.... i use berkley SERIES ONE rods for tubes and lizzards.. and i LOVE them ,.... 80 bucks a rod but i will always own one ...i couldnt see my self without them...
     
  16. Banker

    Banker Banned

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    I agree with ultradrift on the ugly stiks. I've got a light action 5'6" spinning rod(the lite series). I like it bc it only has 5 eyelets (cast farther due to less friction, also less places for line to get hung up on). The shorter length is also nice for casting in tighter spaces (like when wading a smaller river and there are tree branches to deal with)It appears to be very well made and can take a lot of abuse. Its fun like an ultralight yet has a little more "uummphh" for those bigger fish. while clearly there are better rods out there, I would have to say that the ugly stik is a no-nonsense rod that is hard to beat for the price (about $35). Plus they have a 5 year warranty I believe. For the smallie fishing in the locations I fish(I think I'll be very lucky if I catch a smallie >4 lbs this year..or next year for that matter) I think the light action is perfect(I also catch tons of smaller smallies that would not be nearly as much fun on a medium action). If you fish bigger bodies of water with bigger fish, you'd probably want to go medium-lite or medium. Or if this will be your only rod and want to use it for more species (like larger cats) you should also consider medium-light or medium.
     
  17. You will find that St. Croix rods will be "stiffer" than other quality rods of the same rating. I don't know why, but Croix's are always a bit stiifer in all their series (Primier, Avid, Legend) as well as type (spinning, casting, flyrod's).
     
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