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Should I walk away from this

Discussion in 'Boats and Motors' started by The One, Jan 29, 2008.

  1. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    Looking at a boat with a motor that is an '94 88 SPL Johnson that hasn't been run in probably two years. It has been stored pretty much indoors by someone who has a clue. This is a V4 with cylinder readings as follows #1 130psi with 10% leakdown; #2 125 psi/20%; #3 130 psi/9%;#4 120psi/14% the two low cylinders are not side by side. These were done cold start. It was recommended to retest after adding some "engine tuner," and letting the engine warm to temp (another $80). I have read where the rings can be a little sticky after a few years in storage. I have already commited to retesting as I see this a smaller price than the total overall cost. I am currently getting a decent deal on the boat but factoring in a new motor would negate that. I guess my question is if the results on the leak down come back over 10% should I walk away from this boat? Looking at an $8,600 boat that am paying around $8,000 for. What would you do?

    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. I guess my question would be "What was done for those two years under winterization conditions?" I mean was there any stabil put in the fuel? Was the engine fogged and then left to sit all this time? How long has the fuel been sitting in the tank? My next question would be the condition of the water impeller? Two years is a long time for any engine to sit. IMO I would walk away. There are plenty of other boats out there that wouldn't have so many questions with it. Hope this helps.
     

  3. what kind of boat is it and is it the same year?
     
  4. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    It's not the same year boat and motor the boat is a 2002 and is spotless. The motor is a 1994. The boat was bought new and only used 1 1/2 years. It was owned by someone who professionally maintained boats in a marina. My guess is he was saving some money by either buying a cheaper used motor or he had it on hand. The engine was fogged to my knowledge and stored in a heated room until this year.

    I have done a little more research and have read where the rings can relax a bit after storage. It recommended running the engine to opearting temp then rechecking the compression and leak down. I think I will feel more at ease knowing this if the numbers come back better.
     
  5. I inherited an '86 Sunbird with an I/O. The engine is a Volvo Penta 125 4 cylinder. When we first checked the engine, the results were not good (i don't remember the exact numbers now, but, they were bad) after the boat sat for 4 years, in the open, unprotected. After changing the plugs, wires, rotar, fuel pump, water impeller, changing the oil, and adding stabilizer we ran the motor until it warmed-up the results were much better and now I have a good boat for fishing Erie.

    I would recomend re-testing and try to negotiate the cost of the second test be either covered by the seller or knocked off the price of the boat.
     
  6. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    I actually negotiated it into the price already :) started at $8400 minus $150 for testing; $150 for batteries and $150 for an impeller change. But thanks for the info makes me feel more confident if the results come back good.
     
  7. UFM82

    UFM82 The one others want to be

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    An engine, if properly stored, won't suffer any noticeable effects from long term storage. I've run numerous V8s that have been assembled and sat for longer than that and have had 0 problems out of them. Granted, 4 stroke versus 2 but still not that much difference. The leak down you saw was cold and I'd expect that. Once the engine is brought to operating temperature and properly de-winterized or stored, it should be well within range. The fogging oil IS thick and sticky- that's how it works. I wouldn't write the boat off until after the engine has been run thoroughly.

    I've also found that older engines, particularly those of 10 years or older tend to not have many mechanical issues. I'm a firm believer that 99% of true engine failures are due to owner negligence or abuse, not a mechanical flaw or failure. I rarely see a failure that wasn't caused by an oil-starvation issue, an overheat or an over-rev condition. All these things can be avoided and it's not the engine's fault if it lets go under these conditions. It takes a LOT to blow an engine IMHO.

    If it means anything, my opinion is that the 88spl was a beast of an engine. I've seen many, many of those on pontoons with hundreds of hours on them. Talk about a heavy load on a small engine. If they live there, they'll live anywhere.

    UFM82
     
  8. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    Thanks UFM82 I appreciate the information. I'm still waiting on the second readings but I feel a lot better about the initial 20% leakdown now.
     
  9. The One

    The One Ret. 1SG U.S. Army

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    Well I am now officially a boat owner. The tests came back great with 20% coming up to 8% and the 14% to 10%. The lowest cylinder reading was 128psi. The mechanic put a 115hp wheel on it in the tank and was really pleased how well it pulled and came up to temp at idle, mid and WOT. The boat is a 2002 Crestliner 1600 Superhawk and I can't wait for warm weather. Thanks for all that replied.
     
  10. Cogratulations, good luck with your new boat!!