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i had a rod i picked up from basspro back in the spring time one of there one hit wonders just for spring sale bionicplus spinning combo. this rod was a split grip i loved it befor it broke in half 1st day out with it .i traded it back thx to gear guard and picked up a pfluger trion gx7 combo.my problem i switched the same exact line i had on the bass pro one onto the trion but feeling seems to be alot diffrent .boths rods are medium 7 ft one peice rods one was split other regluar handle do split grips really offer more feel for ur lures. it seemed when i was useing the bass pro splitgrip had more feel for lure i was useing could feel it moving in water . trion same exact line had on other but not much feel even used same style of snap but think theres a difference been debateing if pick up another split grip rod combo but unsure if split grips really offer more feel or if rod was a fluke. can anyone give some insight on split vs reg handle or anyone else notice a diffrence useing same type of line on both same test . i currently have only reg handles in my pole lineup .either looking at a president or a garcia split grip spinning combo just unsure if fluke or truely was more feel with useing split grip .

onto the storage issues well possiable solutions.i try to fish on a budget when i can alot of nice boxes out but some simpler ideas cheaper as well .i came across a sterlite box 2.7 qt works well for holding bunch of cranks perch spreaders etc .useing rubberbands on cranks will save tons of frustration on tangled hooks trying get them out of box .think with sterlite box holds somewhere around 50 to 60 cranks up size 14 in huskyjerks or reefrunners useing rubberbands tangle free . the box won't take up much space which sometimes is everything in a bag or on the boat the kicker box is under 4 dollars at wm .bands will work for either large or small crankbaits lip or lipless styles . lip style baits lay hook on belly of bait run rubber band up over front hook or hooks than the lip.lipless style or smaller same thing as other but might have make few wraps around bait .everyone gets tangles but useing the bands helps minimize chance of it .for weight forward spinners or rooster tails the hook holders work well insert ur hooks into holder and again take a rubberband put over holder this will help keep baits from tangleing .leaders,blades or worm harnesses sportscard pages the ones that hold sportcards or others should work well keeping things seprated .you can also put them in a binder or old trapperkeeper you have laying around .now the age old ? with all the colors and names out there was told a good trick how to remember colors.take a sharpie or other permant marker and write on the lip or bodie of the crankbait name of it . with blades write it on the back of the blade helps to remember names . but with doing this a checklist should be saved on file so you can make notes what you have or forbid the elusive tree fish or that stubborn snag fish takes your lure .also another shorter option if you don't wanna write full name out on bait maybe use letters with numbers and have a checklist to look name up. most have trolling charts anyways onboard or other paper work a binder could keep everything organized.everything listed above are cheap solutions usally all under 10 dollar range .
 

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When you say split grip, I'm assuming you mean a split rear grip. If that's the case, the reason for a split rear grip is really more to save weight, than it is anything else. Your hand is still resting on a rear grip when you're holding the rod in your hand, so I doubt that there is going to be much of a difference in sensitivity, unless there's a drastic difference in the density of the material that is used to make the respective grips.

I looked up the two rods on line, and the descriptions say that they use the same modulus graphite in their construction, but that doesn't mean their blanks are built the same. The way a rod blank is constructed has a lot to do with how sensitive it is. I would guess that the difference in sensitivity you're feeling is the result of a difference in blank construction, and not from the difference in handles.

If there's a difference in the rods' reel seats ..... for instance one rod has a section of the rod blank exposed, and the other one doesn't...... the rod with the exposed reel seat will usually feel more sensitive, because the hand holding the rod, comes in contact with the rod blank. Also, if one rod has a fore grip and the other one doesn't, the rod that doesn't have the fore grip is usually going to feel more sensitive because our fingers will be in contact with the blank, and not a grip.

Hope the explanation helps.
 

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When it comes to rods, there is a lot going on. From a sensitivity standpoint. a rod will never be more sensitive than the bare blank it is built on. Everything added to the weight increases the rods inertia, causes it to react and recover more slowly, and decreases efficiency and sensitivity. The weight penalty increases drastically as you approach the tip of the rod. The smallest, lightest guide train you can use will result in a better performing rod when compared to the same rod with oversized guides. I believe the BPS rod you mentioned used micro guides, and the Pflueger uses more traditionally sized guides. This can have a significant effect.

The next thing is the grips. This is one area where things get a little complicated. Some production rods will assemble handles on a piece of tube that is then arbored to the rod blank, so they save money by buying components of the same size, and others assemble the components on the blank. No manufacturer that I've seen pays proper attention to fitting and weight reduction. There are lots of places to add weight to a rod and the end user would never know. A split grip will be lighter than a full grip of the same material (on the same blank). The handle is where you can save a lot of weight when you want a lighter rod, but removing an ounce from the handle area has about the same effect as removing a quarter ounce from the guide train.

Split reel seats are one area where the truth can be deceiving. Most split reel seats weigh in as heavy or heavier than their full bodied cousins, especially if trim rings are added.

As bassbme said, all rods aren't created equally, it is what the designer does with the material that is important. A poorly designed blank with high modulus material may well be outperformed by a lower modulus material in a blank designed by a better designer. Manufacturing techniques also come in to play. I know of at least one line of blanks that is made from low modulus graphite that ends up lighter and more sensitive than most manufacturers' mid modulus offerings, because the lower modulus blank is built without the use of a lower modulus scrim material.

Many rods use multi-modulus lay ups where the blanks is made from two or more materials that are used for their properties in various sections of the rod. There are some great rods produced this way.

After all of that is said, there is one more trick that production companies use that is really sneaky. There are limits to the elastic modulus of graphite that can be used reliably in a rod. There are a number of companies that claim to use materials that won't produce a reliable rod, as they would require too little material to offer the durability needed, but by just wrapping a little of this material around the butt of the blank, the marketing team can claim that the rod was constructed USING this material, when in fact it contributes nothing of significance to the rod. If the two rods in question are in fact produced entirely using the material claimed, there would be a difference between them that you could fell, but not to the point where one feels completely dead compared to the other.

I suspect that some sort of the combination of the above factors have contributed to the difference you feel in the two rods you've handled. The more rods you can handle side by side when you make your purchase the better. Also, keep in mind that high modulus blanks aren't the end all, be all of fishing. There are applications where the lower modulus materials shine.

Joe
 
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