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Rod length

Discussion in 'Steelhead Talk' started by lucky1, Jul 27, 2007.

  1. I've always went with spinning gear while fishing for steelies. I use a 10 ft 8 wt spinning rod, but I tried my buddies fly rod with a slinky weight on it and really liked it. I came across a nice fly rod an old man was selling, is 8' 6" long enough, or do I need to get a longer one. Also how do I know if it is sturdy enough?

    If that is not long enough, had anyone ever heard of adding on to the length of a rod? Be it at the butt or a different way?
     
  2. For fly fishing, a 10' 7 weight is near ideal for steel, especially for drifting egg patterns or nymphs. A longer rod helps with line control for longer drifts. Technically, you could add to the butt section, but the end result, time and cost wouldn't make a lot of practical sense.
     

  3. Thanks a lot, looks like I'm going to be investing in a new fly rod :D .
     
  4. Like Goby said 10' 7# is perfect for Ohio.But if you are going to be doing the chuck and duck with the slinkie you might want to beef it up to an 8#.Chuck and duck isnt really to great for Ohio as our streams are pretty slow and shallow.If you are going to fish big Michigan or New York rivers you would fit right in.
     
  5. I'm not looking for the best grade but what would a round about price be for a average 10ft 7# fly rod?
     
  6. All over the board, from under $50 bucks to over $500 bucks. To a point, more dollars usually provides more quality. Depends on what you want out of the rod. The St. Croix fly rods are a decent compromise between cost and quality. A lot depends on the type of fishing you will be doing. I tend to do a lot of roll casting while stripping clousers/streamers, so a rod with some good backbone was necessary. I went with a 10' sage, which has treated me good to this point.

    Keep an eye on sales boards on this and other area fishing websites for used deals. Guys seem to be always upgrading or switching to another method (like fly to centerpin).
     
  7. The Redington Red.Fly is a nice rod for around 100 bones. It has a lifetime warranty and comes with a nice rod tube. It's light with a moderate fast tip. It casts and handles fish well.