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Eat Em Up Charters
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I am going to have my boat at the marina for a week and a half, so I figured that would be a good time to replace my trailer bunks and carpet. (Some of the carpet has torn and one of the bunks is cracking) I was going to get the wood to have it ready to go for when I am up at the lake. I have read multiple conflicting things on the best wood to use. A lot of people say Cypress but that is pretty hard to get around me. Another option is Cedar which is a little more expensive but doable. I have read conflicting things on using PT wood. Some say to use it and others say not to because it will react with the other metals even through the carpet. I am using SS hardware, aluminum trailer and aluminum boat.

Anyone have personal insight on what would be the best option? Should I just get regular pine and coat it?
 

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Best option? I too was going to do mine, but took it to Ravenna marine to tune up my motor. Told them about the bunks, they replaced all four of them on my trailer for $150. Now, that was in 2015 but they still look like new.
 

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Thanks guys appreciate it. If I could figure the pic thing I’d post a pic of him.

13.5 inches white crappie 6 year old with both hands in the air screaming is the pic.

Very proud of him!
Ok so I am going to have my boat at the marina for a week and a half, so I figured that would be a good time to replace my trailer bunks and carpet. (Some of the carpet has torn and one of the bunks is cracking) I was going to get the wood to have it ready to go for when I am up at the lake. I have read multiple conflicting things on the best wood to use. A lot of people say Cypress but that is pretty hard to get around me. Another option is Cedar which is a little more expensive but doable. I have read conflicting things on using PT wood. Some say to use it and others say not to because it will react with the other metals even through the carpet. I am using SS hardware, aluminum trailer and aluminum boat.

Anyone have personal insight on what would be the best option? Should I just get regular pine and coat it?
Back in the late 90's, i got tired of changing bunks. No matter what wood you use, the carpet holds the water in promoting rot.
I went over to plain old treated 2 x 4's and mounted the "slick sticks" on them and have not changed a bunk since.
What they are, are a 3 1/2" w x bout 10" long pieces of very slick plastic that mounts to the top side of your bunk. They work FANTASTIC. Theres a slight learning curve with they're use, but nothing to drastic. I would never go back to carpet.
With the abence of a contsantly wet rug around your wood bunk, they dry out super quick and last much, much longer.
I'll see if i can find some pics of them to give you a better idea of what i'm talking about.
Good luck either way you good, bncw.

These are a very cheap version of what i use (without the carpet) but it gives you the idea of what i'm talking about.

Automotive design Vehicle
 

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I had plastic bunk covers and found they were wearing off the gel coat on my hull. Do you get that with yours $diesel$?
 

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Pressure treated wood and outdoor carpeting copied size and shape of old bunks,about 20 years and still good.Also I used stainless staples.
 

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I had plastic bunk covers and found they were wearing off the gel coat on my hull. Do you get that with yours $diesel$?
My boat is aluminum, i've noticed no adverse effects. My other boat was also aluminum.
Sorry, Super, i didn't think about the fiberglass boats. I can understand your problem as those skids are seriously hard.
I have never owned a glass boat and i have no idea what you guys go through keeping your hulls in good condition.
In my younger, LM fishing days, i opted for aluminum cuz it was much easier to fix, always banging into shoreline rocks and what not.
 

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Eat Em Up Charters
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Southern yellow pine, much stronger than regular white pine.
Be careful with treated wood, it can have bad reaction with your hull.
I found out about southern yellow pine after talking to EZ Loader. The last time I needed some, I ordered it at Menards.
Thanks for the tip! I was able to find the yellow pine I need from 2 local Menards so I didn’t have to special order it in.
 

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Fishin-For-Fun
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repairing bunks on my triple axle trailer for the lake erie Baha sportfishing boat. that is a fiberglass hull with a bottom coating. i am using the "yellow wood" pressure treated wood for the bunks that need replaced - props chewed loading last year. original bunks were also pressure treated. this is for a fiberglass hull so no worries with reacting with hull materials. i got home depot outdoor carpet cut into about 14" strips (they will cut free at store) and use 9/16" stainless steel staples. thought about gluing the carpet to the surface as it could reduce tearing - but decided to just do carpet this time and if it tears again, next repair will glue carpet to bunks. as for longevity of bunk wood - this trailer is 10-years old and sits outside year around - no wood rot here so far. also is an aluminum and galvanized steel trailer with direct to wood contact with aluminum brackets w/ galvanized lag screws and i don't see any reaction going on there but the screws do surface rust in a year where in wood contact. however, i still do not use treated lumber in the bunks for my alumacraft boat (aluminum) as don't want to risk the reaction between the two that i have heard others talk about... of course there is a pretty heavy paint coating on that hull but still not worth the hull risk and that boat/trailer is stored indoors.
 
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