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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Talk to a guy today that recommends rainshadow blanks. Anybody have any experience with these rods? I've been a lamiglas guy for a long while, but he highly recommends these rainshadows now.

Any input will be helpful.
 

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Rainshadow makes a very nice blank. I fish a fair number of them, and they perform well. The fact of the matter is that virtually all of the manufacturers of blanks I've used make nice blanks. If you are happy with your Lamis don't go and replace them all with Rainshadows. There is no real advantage to doing so, unless you want me to build you a set of rods ;). But, if you are looking for a new rod, they are worth a look.

I've found that the Rainshadow blanks are very much inline with what I expect based on line/lure ratings. I've built on and regularly fish RX6, RX7, and RX8+ blanks. The RX8 models have a great following, but I haven't had a chance to try one yet. The RX8+ blanks are built in the US and will compete with any top shelf blank out there. The RX7 are a great balance between price and performance. The RX8 and RX8+ models are icing on the cake. The RX6 are nice as well, but for the small difference in price, an RX7 model is significantly more sensitive and efficient.

If you are a fan of Lamiglas rods, MHX blanks are worth a solid look from you. The MHX line was developed when Mud Hole hired away Todd Vivian, a production manager at Lami, I believe. Todd oversees the MHX line, and I'm sure you will find some very similar blanks for certain applications there. I've handled blanks from both the MHX and MHX HiMod lines, and they are very nice. I've built on one MHX for myself, and even though it wasn't quite what I expected (should have ordered SJ783 instead of MB782), it still has its uses.

Another manufacturer that I'm a big fan of is Hydra Fishing. Alex's site has been down for a remodel for some time, but the blanks he offers are incredible. They are manufactured in the US, and are the first scrimless blanks offered, making them lighter and more efficient than similar blanks that make use of various scrim materials for hoop strength.

The bottom line is that the blank market is a relatively level playing field. There are practical limits to the carbon fibers used in blanks, and since many can't purchase prepreg in the volumes needed, they use the materials readily produced for the aerospace market rather than ordering a proprietary prepreg. Each manufacturer has their blanks that excel in certain applications. For example, I'm a huge fan of Rainshadows extra fast action bass rods for finesse techniques, and Seeker is the master of S-glass. The blanks they roll for Swampland (RFLE) are among the best cranking blanks available.

If you tell us what application you are considering a Rainshadow for, I might be able to provide a bit more info.

Joe
 

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Anytime guys.

Newbreed,

A little more about the Swampland blanks. Rich Forhan built rods for a number of touring pros for many years. He shared and passed along a lot of info. The guys at Swampland worked with Rich Forhan to develop the Rich Forhan Legacy Elite blanks. The result is a line of 3 blanks, the 726, 765, and 806. These represent the next step in the evolution of the blanks Rich had used for years.

Through tip and butt trims, these blanks can be used to build just about any type of rod for treble hooks you can imagine. One thing I like about blanks rolled by Seeker is that they don't trim the tip and butt of the blank to spec when they are made. This gives the builder a bit more to work with when it comes to tuning a blank. The tip can be left as is, if a little softer tip is needed, or it can be trimmed back to get the tip strength you need. The butt can then be left as is, allowing a rod a couple inches longer than spec length to be built without adding an extension, or can be trimmed to any length desired.

I personally use a 765 with a small tip trim and the rest from the butt for a 7' cranking rod. It can handle very effectively everything from 1/4oz. shallow cranks like the Big-O and Strike King Series 1 through deep divers like the larger Fat Free Shads to the DD22. The 6 power blanks would be nice for a rod dedicated purely to the big deep diving blanks and heavier lures.

For a little marketing info and some other things about these blanks look here and here.

Joe
 
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