Question on casting with a soon.

Discussion in 'Steelhead Talk' started by GaryV311, Dec 1, 2007.

  1. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    When casting with a spoon, should I cast with the flow, against the flow, or across the river?
     
  2. in short, across river towards other bank
     

  3. i don't know about spoons, but with spinners i like to cast against the current, that way you can work it back slow, but the current keeps the spinner spinning real nice
     
  4. corndawg

    corndawg Go Bulldogs!!!

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    To add to what preacherman poster, carefully wade out, if possible, and stand up stream of an area you think holds fish. Cast beyond it and slowly reel in till your in the spot where fish my be holding. Once it reaches the holding area stop winding and hold the lure stationary for a moment, then lift and lower your rod tip slowly. The current flow will give the lure it’s action and if there is a fish near it, it will get pissed with this lure spinning in its face and will slam it. This also works great for river smallmouth with a little rapala. Again be careful wading out, especially now with water temps hovering above freezing. One slip and the walk back to the car will seem forever.
     
  5. One of the biggest things about spoon fishing in the rivers is to remember to keep your rod tip upstream of the spoon and don't point the rod tip at the spoon. By keeping the rod tip up stream it ensures the lure stays tilted upstream, allowing current to work over the head of the lure and down the body, imparting action as the spoon was designed. When the rod tip points directly at the lure , it causes the spoon to become broadside to the current, killing most if not all the action. The other factor is spoon design, different spoons are meant to be used with different situations. Oval style spoons ( little cleos) are better in a faster current, Tear drop spoon styles ( k/o wobblers) are better suited for slower current situations. The one thing you want to remember with spoons is that if they are SPINNING you probably won't get any bites. What you're looking for is a gentle swaying from side to side, or wobble.
    Hope this helps.
    Triple-j
     
  6. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    Wow. That is a lot of pointers in just two posts. Thank you corndawg and TRIPLE-J. I was just about to give up on using spoons. This is my first year fishing for steelhead. I started out with spoons and got 4 so far. But the last 8-10 times I have gone, I have went home empty handed. The current has been a little heavy and murky. I think if I keep striking out, I'll have to try this egg sack style people are using.
     
  7. DanAdelman

    DanAdelman getting jigging with it

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    try spinners also...
    i would cast upstream at a 45 degree angler so that your lure is pushed by the current to where the fish are... my opinion is once your spoon is past you and downstream the current and tension from your line will pull your lure up in the water column where it is unlikely to get a fish...
     
  8. Garyv311,
    If you really want to learn how to spoon fish I suggest you get the book,
    "spoon fishing for steelhead" by Bill Herzog, He is the master of spoon fishing. Book is really a great read. Lots of good info. You can probably order it at any book store .
    Spinners are an excellent choice for steel also, Especially in ohio streams, but you don't want to cast upstream at a 45 degree angle as this will allow your hardware to sink uncontrollably to the bottom allowing your lure to get hung up and snagged way more often than what you want. Your better to stand a little farther upstream from the hole and allow your spoon to drop into the hole, almost like fishing a jig in current. You want to work your spoon through the hole the same way, slowly with you controlling it. When you get the hang of it you can actually bounce the spoon along the bottom with good action just as you would a spawn sack. You throw a jig upstream and the first rock it comes across the current has it wedged in. By casting directly across you have control of the drop and the angle of the spoon. If you do get hung up the downward current will usually swing your spoon out of the snag.
    Rod angle and line mending will get you to the desired depth you want.
    Triple-j
     
  9. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    Thank you once again, TRIPLE-J. I really do like using spoons. No need to find fresh bait. I've tried the jig and maggot, and egg sacks. Nothing..... It looks like it will be kinda nice outside this Sunday, so I will use all that I have learned from this. I will be sure to report how I do.
     
  10. fishing pole

    fishing pole Off the beaten path

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  11. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    Very phunny......
     
  12. fishing pole

    fishing pole Off the beaten path

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    Thanks Gary.

    BTW, this is/was agreat post. Although I rarely(almost never) fish with a spinning rod anymore I have fished a few times the past week when rivers have been high. I learned a thing or two about spoon fishing.
     
  13. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    I agree! I have learned a lot just from this thread. I hope I can handle the weather this Sunday and put it all to good use.
     
  14. A couple of applications that worked well for me in the past:

    Find a deep rapid. Best are the outflows from the fords. Stand on the ford or above the rapid. Pitch the spoon down and retrieve very slowly, letting the spoon wobble in the current. They will normally hammer it. Change colors and let it drop back a bit every once in a while.

    Find a deep hole with some current. Stand toward the top (head) of the pool and cast across and downstream. Start your retrieve with rod tip high and pump it up and down (yo-yo style), making sure that you retrieve a bit when the rod tip drops to keep slack out of the line. Most hits are when the spoon hits the water or during a drop. Vary the size of the spoon based on the current -- more current, larger spoons. You want to work them slow, so I will go to a real small (1/8 oz or smaller) spoon when a slow moving hole.
     
  15. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    Well, I went out today. Rained the whole time, but I stuck with it. The Rocky was pretty murky and high but I tried all the spoons I had. Nothing. Went to a jig and a maggot. Nothing. Didn't really give it a lot of time. About 1.5 hours with each before I called it quits.
     
  16. Today was not a spoon day. Spawn would have been the best option. I fished 12-4 in the rain over a couple miles of river. Was planning on trying a spoon in a few slower runs on the way back, but the visibility went from over 3' to less than 6" in a few hours. I believe it was too dirty and fast for the artificials.
     
  17. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    I'm not sold on the jig and maggot style either. Where can u get fresh spawn sacks? I tried some from Dicks and they didn't do any good.
     
  18. It's been my experience that the overcured sacs in the little jars are WORTHLESS!!! I've never caught a fish with that crap but I have had success this year with natural spawn sacs. I would recomend going to Erie Outfitters in Sheffield Lake and try Craig's spawn sacs that he cures himself. While you're there buy some 'Eg-Cure' so that next time you catch a female you can cure your own eggs...and be sure to ask Craig how he mixes up the cure.
     
  19. GaryV311

    GaryV311 Trout Hunter

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    I noticed the topic of this thread changing so i started a new thread about the eggs. But I will be sure to stop by Erie Outfitters. Thank you.