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wolfenstein
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone ever pull a canoe behind their boat? Heading to voyageur national park end if June. Taking my 16' deep v tracker with 60hp merc, a canoe and kayak. Not sure if should just tie off in a line or try to pile everything onboard. How would a canoe pull empty or should we load it down?
 

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Anyone ever pull a canoe behind their boat? Heading to voyageur national park end if June. Taking my 16' deep v tracker with 60hp merc, a canoe and kayak. Not sure if should just tie off in a line or try to pile everything onboard. How would a canoe pull empty or should we load it down?
Why don't you di a trial run on a local lake?
 

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Hmm I would think some weight in it would be beneficial, keep the weight low in the canoe to keep the center of gravity lower. I would try a test run at a local lake to see how it would do being pulled so not to put a damper on your trip unexpected.
 

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wolfenstein
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking about a trial run found a little info online. Think I'm going to try to tie it across stern if at all possible. Everything I've read doesn't make it seem as simple as tying up and going.
 

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Conservation,the best story that's never told
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Back early on in my waterfowling days, we towed a layout boat behind the tender boat before we had enough money to buy a bigger one. As long as you took your time and had enough line out to get the boat out of the prop wash you were fine.
 

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wolfenstein
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, we have to make a 13mi run and in no hurry, but I'm not trying to make a day of it. Probably going to do a trial run both ways and see what works best. Thanks.
 

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I think I'd be inclined to try securing the canoe to the drivers side of the boat. Obviously, you'd need some decent size boat fenders or padding due to the profile of the canoe vs a relatively flat hull side. We've tied a fishing boat to the side of our 28' liveaboard pontoon & idled down Laurel Lake in KY many times/miles. We had both motors 'pushing' at the same time. If all you intend to do is run less than say 8 mph or so you should be fine. Mike
 

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Towing a canoe is a lot more complicated than most would think. I did Boundary Waters & Quetico trips for 20 years & there when you get a “tow” they tie your canoe on top of the tow boat.

If you do try to truly tow a canoe it needs to be empty. Towed canoes plow so to prevent the plowing, loop your tow rope around the bow of the canoe making sure that the end of the rope is tied UNDER the bow and centered on the keel line. When underway, the rope will lift the bow and the canoe will track along on top of the water.

BE CAREFUL!


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Copied this from a canoeing site. Hope it helps.

The trick is the bridle. You need to come up with a way to get a knot right on the keel line of the canoe, about 2-3 feet back from the bow. When towing a canoe in current (either in rapids or behind a faster boat), I turn it around so the stern seat is at the front. There are a few ways of doing the bridle, but the easiest is to use a chunk about 6-8 ft long to create the bridle. I put a butterfly knot in the middle of that (anything that will create a loop, the butterfly just makes it easy to untie when you don't need it). I postion the loop in the butterfly right on the keel, then I tie the ends of the rope firmly to the stern seat. The knot I use to do this will wrap around the seat so you end up with the bridle going all the way around the hull - that reduces stress. The rope that does the towing gets tied to the loop in the bridle. Because the rope is underwater, as soon as you develop any speed, the front of the canoe will start to lift out of the water, especially if you've got that one pack for ballast and you put that on the opposite side of the center thwart towads the back of the canoe. By doing this, the towed canoe reponds just like there was a motor at the back of it. It'll come up on plane with very little effort. Because the bow it coming up, the stern gets pushed down so you've got a rudder at the back keep it tracking properly. Works like a charm.


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Hmmm....I found the thorough explanation very informative & interesting. I really hadn't envisioned towing tht canoe inline at anything above a fast idle. The tow bridle you described sounds really cool & I'm going to give it a try with my 17' Grumman some time just to say I did it. The location of the payload is definitely an important factor & I was impressed at how well you indicated the towed canoe tracked at what sounds like slow planing speeds. Thanks Meerkat, I appreciate the detailed explanation. Mike
 

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I towed a canoe behind my 17' boat with about a 100' rope for 5-7 miles on a small lake in Canada (flat, no chop) with my buddy in the canoe and no gear. Talk about the canoe fighting the boat wake and plowing water, it was a comedy to watch the amusement (summer day, buddy in swim trunks) ride that should be featured at Cedar Point! Slow was the only way to avoid a spill. Perhaps empty canoe would be better, but my boat was full at the time. Good luck.
 
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