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Discussion Starter · #1 ·




Since I don't post many photos with my reports, I thought I would start this one out with a bang. I cannot divulge the location, but suffice it to say this is well outside my normal stomping grounds. I included length measurement (21 inches - good enough for Fish Ohio) and weight (4 lb, 15 oz). Henceforth, this hawg will be referred to as a 5 pounder. jmpmstr1998 was in attendance, and can vouch for the authenticity of my claims (his scale recorded the weight). To lend additional scale to the first pic, I'm 6 feet tall, 265 lbs, and wearing a life vest (I see it succeeds in making me look fat).

We set out on the water some time after 6 this morning, greeted by a mirror surface, broken only by the ripples of our kayak wakes and paddle strokes. The sky was crystal clear and the golden rays of a new day showed real promise. Visibility was 2-3 feet.

I've been reading a lot about senkos lately, and had a green pumpkin, black flake wacky rigged on a Gamakatsu worm hook (I *think* 3/0), just to try things out, after starting the morning with a zara spook (I have a few) and catching a small LMB on first cast.

I casted from my kayak, letting the senko drop. I set down my rod to adjust the yak's bearing (it tracks like crap), and picked the rod back up. I tried to lift the senko so I could start "working it", and thought I had snagged, which I thought strange since this section of water is sandy bottomed and weedy.

One of the things I like about yak fishing is being able to paddle right up to a snag, in case I can recover from it. So I reeled toward the snag, and it started pulling me! I seldom catch anything big enough to pull drag, but this thing had my rod bent double, so I started backing drag off to let it run. I had no idea what it was. I've caught plenty of big cats, but they don't fight like this. All either of us had caught so far were small largemouths, but this wasn't one (small, that is). The as yet unidentified fish kept running deep into the weeds, so when it finally surfaced, I had to part the weed curtains to see the mammoth. jmpmstr1998 had come over to help out, having watched the battle on his way across the water. When he asked if it was big, I said, "big enough that I'm scared of it!" I finally got it under the gills and pulled it into the yak, arm straining :)

I powered to shore so we could measure, weigh, and take photographic evidence. She took the hook deep, and even though I could fit my fist in her mouth, the hook was stuck fast in her throat, so we cut the line and got her back in the water as quickly as possible. It took 5-10 minutes to revive her enough to take off, but in the end, she retreated back to the deep.

Over the next several hours, I hooked various sized LMB, albeit none as big as my PB (not even close), for a grand total of 32. jmpmstr1998 caught close to 30 (I'll let him comment on his exact total).
 

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Nice fish.

I have to add though, you shouldn't have cut the hook off. The "hooks rust out" thing is largely a myth. Modern hooks, especially good ones like Gamakatsu, cut off in a deep hooked fish will be with it most likely the rest of the fishes life (unless someone else catches it and saves it).

If you do have to cut a hook off, you should leave actually leave a 6 or 7 in piece of line. Studies on fish that have been hooked through there esophagus with a bit of line vs cut off at the hooks eye, actually show a higher mortality rate for fish when the line is cut off at the eye. The biologists who ran the study hypothesized that the piece of line helped hold the eye, and thus hook, flat to the esophagus allowing the fish to feed still. Without the line extending out of the mouth the hook can rotate and block the esophagus, causing the fish to starve.

So if you do leave a hook in, remember to leave a piece of line with it as well.

Your best bet and something everyone should carry imo, is a pair of locking handle surgical hemostats like these:



You can lock them onto a hook and manipulate it much easier than with a conventional pair of needle nose pliers.

The second essential for fish operations is a good, long and narrow pair of wire cutters. I carry a pair of flush-mount ones like these:



I heated the handles up with my propane torch and squeezed mine down to make the more narrow.

When you "gut hook" a fish use the line to gently lift up on the hook, use the wire cutters to snip the eye, then lock your hemostats onto point. Then just run the hook through, dehooking the fish. It will thank you ;)

Another alternative is to carry deep hook removers like any of these:




A good article on taking out gut hooks can be found here

Last alternative is, to eat it. If its hooked deep and you can't get it out then keep the fish. Killing it and eating it is way better off than starvation. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the hook pointers. We did leave some line on it, if I do recall. Hemostats just wouldn't do the job in this case, unfortunately (we both tried). Neither of us had any deep hook removers; hemostats have always worked for me... until today.
 

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That’s a really nice LMB ya got there Ghurlag, congratulations!!

I use a #2 circle hook when I wacky rig a senko & 90%+ of the time I hook the fish in the upper jaw with this hook. Honestly it’s probably closer to 100%, I don’t think I’ve ever hooked a fish in the throat with a circle hook.
I carry hemo’s and needle nose pliers….but I have a habit of losing both...oddly enough I also find them in areas that I frequently fish.
 

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Nice bass! Congrats on your PB.

One more note on deeply hooked bass: one of the best methods I use is to cut the line about 6 inches above the eye, thread the line through the gill plate being careful to stay away from the gills, gently pull down on the line to turn the eye of the hook down towards the gills and to turn the bend so it is pointing up towards the mouth, then pull strait up on the bend with pliers or hemostats. Hook pops right out without tearing up the fish. I've posted links to this method in the past.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
 

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Nice bass!! I can't say enough good thing about theCalibur deep hook remover. If you want to remove gut hooks without hurting the fish this site ONLY tool that works every time. Hemostats and other locking clamp type can work but a lot of the time you will injure the fish. The deep hook remover flips the hook and it is the only tool ive seen that does that. Since I've had mine I've removed gut hooks out of a lot of fish and they don't even bleed. If you want to catch and release not hurt the fish this tool should be manditory
 

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Unfortuneately my count stopped at 28. Glad you got the monster. Next time my turn.:D
Still. Not bad for a first trip to a new spot.


Sent from my GT-P5113 using Ohub Campfire mobile app
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Unfortuneately my count stopped at 28. Glad you got the monster. Next time my turn.:D
Still. Not bad for a first trip to a new spot.


Sent from my GT-P5113 using Ohub Campfire mobile app
Good thing it's so far away; otherwise O'd never get anything else done. Had a great time!

We should be too big to take offense and too noble to give it. -Abraham Lincoln
 
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