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nightcrawlers

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by mach1cj, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. how do you guys keep your nightcrawlers? lookin' for some ideas.
     
  2. just toss em in the fridge....

    A more wife friendly aproach ......keep them in the fish cooler in a shady spot, just remember to drain water & add ice every coupple days. we have a foam worm box that we keep all summer this way. Of course the worms all get cycled out every week or so drifting harnesses.
     

  3. We have fridge in the Garage....

    Now on the boat...

    We also place them(couple dozen 2 a time) in Zip lock bags.... filled with cool water.. to store in the cooler on the boat...

    why a Zip Lock??? ..easy to toss around... and put back in the cooler with no lids blowing away ot contaiers dumping...

    they(Crawlers) come out nice and clean and ready to dance on the hook....

    on Hot summers days.. just add ice.... to keep them cool..

    No muss, no fuss, and most of ALL no mess...

    Frank
     
  4. fishingguy

    fishingguy The Inferior Fisherman

    Why do women object to keeping live worms in the fridge. They have dinners in there they made 3 weeks ago! No one ate it the night they made it, so why do they think someone is going to eat it later?:confused: :D
     
  5. fishon....are you storing crawlers in zip lock with cold water and no bedding of any kind? Am I reading your post right? How long do they stay alive like that?

    Thanks
     
  6. K gonefishin

    K gonefishin Eye Slayer

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    He meant while fishing we store them like that, while they are not being used in a zip lock bag with worm bedding, we buy ours in 100 packs from Rodmakers and that is how they come when you buy them. Worm bedding is a must and a zip lock with ice water is the best for when you are using them on the boat they get super plump and long when in ice water, last may and june we would go through up to 8 dozen per trip. Lots of crawlers getting used on the boat that's for sure. I actually just picked up a new crawler bucket by plano, looking forward to using it this year, dump proof unlike the zip lock when I don't close it.
     
  7. fishingguy, when the wife discovers my bucket of shiners in the fridge next to the container of maggots, I just say mmmm "surf & turf".
     
  8. corndawg

    corndawg Go Bulldogs!!!

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    My wife knows I keep my bait in the frig and but doesn’t say much about it. I hide my crawlers and maggots behind a large jar of pickled herring and maybe a big bag of pork rids on the bottom shelf. Being that I’m the only one who’ll touch, let alone eat that stuff my bait is never seen. Out of sight, out of mind. ;)
     
  9. I don't mind them in the fridge, but they have to go on the bottom shelf or in the drawer. He usually keeps things pretty clean. The only problem is when my youngest sees them in there and decides he wants to play with a crawler and makes a huge mess. As long as all the baits are together, then I just don't say anything. I am sure I leave stuff around that he just don't say anything about. It is a compromise!
     
  10. Flathead King 06

    Flathead King 06 click...click...click

    ive always stored my crawlers in an old igloo cooler (smaller cooler) in shredded newspaper (cellulose) with the lid cracked open then i put them in the garage in an old fridge.... the best temps to keep crawlers at are in the 50's-60 degrees.... if any of you are interested in "hardcore" crawler keeping or raising... the book Lunkers Love Nightcrawlers is the best book I have ever read on teaching you how to keep crawlers for short or extended periods of time... if you have any other question please feel free to ask
     
  11. So a cool basement < 65 degrees would work? I read that shredded newspaper works well. Do you moisten it? Do you add and any food and if so what would work best? Does this work for long term such as all summer/fall?
     
  12. Used coffee grounds with the filter too, wet newspaper, clean sawdust from untreated lumber moistened of course, dry rotting leaves from the yard....pretty much any organic plant material that is not treated with any type of oil or chemical and has a certain amount of moisture will feed nitecrawlers and keep them happy.
     
  13. Flathead King 06

    Flathead King 06 click...click...click


    Sorry it took so long to get back with you on this... as for a basement at < 65 degrees, it will work just frequently check on the crawlers to make sure they are ok...

    There are a number of things you can use for bedding; peat moss bought from the craft store soaked in water over night and "rung" out, but the most inexpensive is shredded news paper and it does work very well, and the trick to it is to just put the paper in a container and put the worms on top of it... they will work their way down into the paper so you will be able to pick out any dead or hurt worms on top, and the slime coating from the worms will most of the time make the paper wet enough to where you dont have to moisten it, but if you do- use water VERY sparingly

    when keeping the crawlers for short periods of time no food is necessary because the fibers in the paper and the paper itself will break down and the worms will feed on it... but when long term storage occurs, I always buy chicken mash or laying mash and lightly sprinkle some on top. You can purchase it in small quantities at most feed stores or larger pet shops. Do not buy what is called "crumbles". What you need is the finest ground mash available. Lightly sprinkle the mash on the top of the bedding. It is far better to put too little food than too much. You will soon learn what your crawlers will eat in a 24 hour period. Do not add additional food until what is there is completely gone. After feeding, lightly spray the food, which will allow your worms to easily consume it. Some words of caution: If you plan to harvest some worms, do so before you feed. Never mix food into the bedding. It will cause a condition known as "protein poisoning" which is a build-up of acid within the bedding caused by the decomposition of the food. If you notice your worms dying, it will be a result of this condition, immediately remove them from the bedding and start with new. This will not be a problem if you underfeed rather than overfeed your earthworms and don&#8217;t attempt to harvest with food in your bin.

    and lastly, I have used these methods for several years now and have stored worms in my garage in the old fridge for up to a year... just as long as you maintain the conditions of the storage container and properly care for them they will last a long time
     
  14. Fishman

    Fishman Catch bait???

    Found out my yard is loaded with them today while digging a trench. Old lady didn't like having them thrown at her either ;D