New Fisher needs help at Hoover

Discussion in 'Central Ohio Fishing Reports' started by NEW2FISHIN, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. Hello all!

    I've just started fishing recently and would like to know a few good spots to fish at Hoover Dam. I recently fished where Walnut Rd. deadends into the dam. It was very slow and the water was super low. I was fishing with a "rapala" lure and only caught one 4" bluegill LOL. Any advice would be great! What a peacefull sport! Thanks for any advice in advance.
     
  2. seethe303

    seethe303 Senior Executive Member

    what kind of fish are you targeting?

    I think many of the flows are low right now because of the lack of rain. You may want to try the rip rap on Hoover, or Alum, or any of the local reservoirs.
     

  3. Thanks for the reply!

    Where/What is the "rip rap" I'm fishing for anything I can catch, but mostly bluegill since they're the easiest to catch, I'm told.
     
  4. Nevermind. Dumb question.
     
  5. EE

    EE

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    Welcome to the board.

    The fish most people target in Hoover are Crappie, Saugeye and Catfish, with some White Bass chasers as well. That's not to say those are the only fish in the reservoirs, just the ones most targeted.

    There are a variety of ways of fishing for each species, so I'll list what I think are the easiest ways to get started. Then you can use the "search" function at the top of the forum to get more information (type in Hoover Catfish, or Hoover Saugeye, or Hoover Crappie).

    If you do not have access to a boat, try hitting some of the coves with some chicken liver and cut shad on the bottom (catfish). Walk the banks and look for structure (downed trees, rock piles, etc.) and suspend minnows under a bobber for crappie (try different depths until you find them). Same thing for Saugeye, although you may choose to cast jigs/twistertails, or crankbaits/jerkbaits (like husky jerks and rogues) and the areas you target should be relatively shallow with nearby dropoffs, and plenty of structure (downed trees, rockpiles, rocky shorelines like the dams and bridges - this is what they call rip rap, etc.). Sometimes you hit the shelf, sometimes you hit the drop off, sometimes you hit the structure hard, etc. (and again, lots of ways to get at these fish..... this is only a starting point).

    sometimes you're fishing for crappie and you catch saugeye and catfish, sometimes you fish for saugeye and catch catfish and crappie, etc. Just take notes on what you were doing and after lots of hours, you can start to develop a pattern that improves your success.

    good luck!
    EE