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I've been out three times this year (twice with brother) once with dad....we have gone everywhere moved a lot tried all the good spots (according to the reports on OGF..Crib-Goldcoast-Stadium..for walleye and we just cannot catch anything we have all been fishing for a long time but it seems like were not getting on the fish even though i am marking... we use eries,spoon,rinoskys but nothing (WE HAVE ONLY DRIFTED) how can we catch some fish so we aren't out for eight hours getting sunburned
 

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Since I don't tend to drift, it's difficult to offer suggestions. People catch a lot of walleye drifting. If that's your prefered technique, then maybe there is some piece of the puzzle you are missing.

Are you using/loosing lot of crawlers off you dearies when drifting or not getting any hits at all?

Could your drift be too fast or too slow? A sea anchor can slow ya down (5 gallon bucket over the side).

Is each person taking a certain part of the water column so all depths are covered to locate the fish?

Do a seach on this site for "drifting". You will likely find a wealth of info that may help you out. I am certain there are some drifters out there who can offer you some suggestions.

Some people don't like trolling and I understand why. It does help you cover a lot of water, at controlled speeds and depths. It can also be a costly investment in equipment depending on what you already own. Join someone who trolls on the water before making an investment in equuipment for trolling.

Best of luck......hope you figure out what the missing piece is.
 

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Drift speed is probably the most important aspect of drifting deeries, harnesses.
Myself, I like a drift speed of about 1 1.5 mph.
You need enough speed to turn the blade on deeries, yet do not let the fish get a real good look at the bait.
If the drift is slow try slowly reeling it in as your drifting.
Drift to fast and the fish has no time to react to the bait. Throw out a bucket or sock.
Color of the bait is important in water less than 30 feet deep.
My favorite colors for the drift is Gold and then silver chrome.
What is going on around you?
Is there a lot of boats in the area?
There may be to much noise about you, so break away from the packs to a quieter area.
There are so many things that can affect the biting mood of fish. You just have to keep at it and don't be afraid to try something new if they aint co- operating.
 

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Walleyeguy is a pro at drifting. SO listen to him if you want to drift.

Last year I was in your shoes. My dad and I were getting back into walleye fishing after a hiatus of several years. When we stopped walleye fishing at the Islands, people were transitionig to more trolling and we didn't really know what the deal with that was...and it was time for a break (This was early 90's, I was finishing High School and College). Anyways, blah blah blah, and last year we wanted to start catching walleye again.

I found this website and started annoying people with questions. And while people are very helpful, it is still overwhelming when you get out on the lake with Dipsies, Jets, Line Counters, Braided Lines, Fluorocarbon Leaders, a trillion spoons (small ones, large ones), Cranks, Harnesses, Rodholders, trolling bags, kicker motors, and ball-bearing swivels. Then the question is what the heck do I do and where do I start?

For the above reasons, I try to give good information about the program I am running on the radio. I know that annoys some people, but for newbs, that information is very welcome (I know it was for me). If you choose to try trolling, I can summarize a few things. Take this with a grain of salt because I am still learning too.

FIRST THINGS FIRST

1. Line: 30lb braid is good for dipsies. I've used as light as 10lb. But with the small diameter of braid, I'd say go for 30lb.

2. Reels:: You must have line counting reels. They sell some Shimano line counters at Wal Mart. They are CRAP. We got some Okuma 300 (debateable whether they are crap) but they are cheap starter reels and seem to work well. We and also bought some Daiwa 47LC used. Cabelas sells some Sea Line combos reasonably too.

3. Rods: Get some 8'6" medium action rods with a lot of eyelets and long shafts so that they stay in your Rodholders.

4. Rodholders To start, pretty much anything will work. We have some cheap plastic ones that came with our boat. I don't like them at all, but they work. The boat also came with a couple Cabelas quick release rod holders, I like those much better. The more I troll, the more it looks like I am going to be dropping some cash on some good rodholders. Hetfield Inn's Titelok holders work really nice, and they can also save you when you almost fall over the side of the boat and need something to grab on to.

5. To kicker or not to kicker: There is a lot to go over here. Some people may remember 2 morons trying to troll with tiller steered 9.9HP Merc, on a 22foot Trophy, out at Edgewater early last year. That was me and my dad. We couldn't even see where we were going. We ended up using our main motor and some 5 gallon buckets (you may substitute trolling bags) hung over the side to get our trolling speed down. This is where a GPS (cheap handheld will work for starters) or low-speed speedometer is critical. You need to know how fast you are trolling and you want to be able to range between 0.8 to 3 MPH at any given time.

Now we use a 3.9HP kicker on our 18 foot Grumman, with an Easy Steer bracket. We can run that all day on like 2 gallons of gas or less, and these days that is nice. It's also nice to have that kicker when the big motor craps out on you ( like ours did yeasterday) so you can get back in (albeit slowly).

TACKLE

1. Dipsies: Get Big (#1) and Small (#0) dipsies. There are other sizes, but on the radio when people say Big and Small, this is what they are talking about. You may choose to paint your dipsies black...I haven't gotten around to it, I have black, silver, red, purple, tiger, and green dipsies. If the fish are hungry, it won't matter much.

2. Jets: Get some Jets. I would suggest (1)Jet 10, (2)Jet 20, (2)Jet 30, (1) Jet 40. I've nabbed a few walleye on Jet 10s late in the season (and some white bass yesterday...I HAD to find out what those high marks were :p )

3. Leaders: Tie up some Fluorocarbon leaders, I use ~8 feet, #2 ball-bearing swivel on 1 end, and a #2 clip on the other. The idea is to rate the leader a little less than your main line so that the leader breaks before your main line. This way you only use your lure and not your Dipsy/Jet. Fluorocarbon has less memory, so it's good to use, because you generally wind it up tight to store it.

4. Swivels: I use #3 on the Rods, and #2 on the Leaders. Get good ball-bearing swivels (the ones at Wal Mart are NOT good). You can use simple clips on the lure side of your leaders.

5. Snubbers: These are rubber thingies that go between your leader and the Dipsy. I have them. Some people swear by them. I never use them. At least they have no hooks so my daughter can play with them without getting hurt.

6. Boards: You will see people pulling big boards and smaller inline boards. I would say don't worry about boards right now. In the Spring and Fall inline boards are good when fish are very shallow. Bigboards look like an ENORMOUS pain in the <expletive deleted> to me. We have a mast and boards that came with our current boat, but they stay at home in the barn.

6. Cranks: I've never caught a darned thing on a crank. I keep buying them though. These you straightline (no dipsey or jet), there is a book that tells you depth curves for a ton of cranks. It's 30 bucks at Gander Mountain. I have it. Hasn't done much for me yet (YET!).

7. Spoons: Most people use Ole Pete's, Michigan Stinger, and RAC spoons. When people say "Scorpion" they mean the smaller spoons--like 2.5 inches or so. In general, early in the year Scorpions seem to do better, later in the year the full-size spoons (Stingers) do better. To start off your collection get Confusion, Watermelon, Bloody Nose, Monkey Puke, Blueberry Muffin, Shrimp, Kevorkian, Dirty White Boy and Orange Crush. I'm sure others have other favorites but this gets expensive fast. To add to your costs, most of these come in either silver or copper plated...and you probably need to have both. Some days copper is better, other days silver is.

A note on spoons: I hate treble hooks. They always gank my fingers and I don't think they set as well. For this reason, I swap out the trebles on my spoons with a single Siwash (or similar) hook. I also try to spray clear acrylic or urethane on my Michgan Stinger brand spoons, because the finish doesn't hold up too well.

8. Meat Harnesses: Some days the crawler harnesses outfish all other stuff. I usually get weapon style harnesses, with dark red beads and silver or gold spinners. Ole Pete's makes some nice ones, but I've had luck with just about any brand.

JARGON, etc

When you are out there, people ask for numbers and settings. Someone will say "Big Dipsey, 3 and a half, 75 feet Back, Monkey Puke". This is pretty self explanatory really but I would like to clarify one thing: Dipsey Divers can be set from 0 to 3.5 left or right. This just means that the dipsey will run outward from the boat in varying degrees. This is essential for running multiple lines, so you do not get tangles. A dipsy at 3.5 requires more line to reach a certain depth than a dipsey set at 1.

Setting dipsey's can be tricky. You want them to trip pretty easily, but not so easily that they trip before you get to the rod, and the fish spits out the hook in that moment of slack. You have to do this by feel and trial and error, but a good place to start is using a fish scale and rate the clip to trip at about 3 pounds. You can adjust from there as you fish. You may need to file or trim the plastic jaws on the dipsy, sometimes the set screw doesn't do a whole lot to loosen the tripping tension.

Jets generally flip over when you get a nice fish on. If you just reel it in to change the lure or something, the Jet won't flip and it always feels like you have a big fish on. This can be embarrassing, so make sure you put some tension on the line and see if anyting is fighting you before you declare "Fish On!".

Hope this helps. I know there are numerous posts by much more experienced and knowledgeable fisherman around here, but I hope this serves as a decent primer, and you don't have to search through 50 threads and glean out a thing here and there. That's more fun when you have a general idea what you are doing. :)
 

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Cowboy Charters
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THat is some pretty good advise Commodore. I am sure a lot of people could use at least some of it, if not all of it, including myself. I don't run dypsies yet but I have some and going to give it a shot soon. I just started running boards this year and still trying to get that program down.

The key to the whole trolling thing is....it gets VERY COSTLY if you don't have anything to start with plan on spending a lot of money to get started.
 

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The Inferior Fisherman
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Very nice COmmodore 64. You going to enter some tourny's soon? You forgot to mention how many cans of beer to bring. I think that's important.:D ;)
 

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Tom B.
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Sertommy: Have you tried drifting with weapons/mayfly rigs yet. I mostly troll, but have drifted a few times with them after trolling and done well. Do a search on here and with a search engine----you'll come up with a lot of info. Can either tie your own or purchase premade ones. We did good on both. I've even done well with them on Mosquito.



Commodore: That is a great post! For myself I like the tip on setting the dipsy with a scale, thanks. Much better than trial and error on a few fish when one day was flat and the next day has 2-4's.
 

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Wow Commodore-that was a great post!

I was just going to tell him to drift (if the wind is strong enough) or slow troll (.8-1.5 mph) worm harnesses with 1/2 a crawler. Best blades are Gold or Copper through May & June and then Chartreuse or Gold through July & August. Large #4 or #5 Colorado, Willow Leaf or Hatchet blades. I catch all I want doing this.

Jim
 

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Just wanted to say "Your Welcome" to the people who said thanks. I don't know what I would have done, had I not found this Site. I'm trying to be a quick study, but there's no way I'm ready for any tournament fishing. I still keep white bass becasue I'm afraid that might be all I'll catch!

One other thing to suggest is that you get to one or more of the OGF gatherings (formal or informal). I learned more at Turtle Creek over 1 weekend this spring than all of last year. Thanks to Kgone and Fishon, I learned what to get (and how) to run inline boards (heh, another 120 bucks down the drain after snap weights, OR-18, OR-16, and Precision Guide to Trolling). Hetfield, Tubuzz, Walleyeguy put us on the fish. CW261 helped us pump out 100 gallons of water after our bilge pump AND silicone sealant failed. Heh. What a community.
 

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Commodore, you are certainly correct than you can learn a great deal from these forums. I live in Livonia, Michigan (grew up in Cortland, Ohio). I have owned a house on Kellys Island for the past 12 years (hence the KI Jim name). I come on this forum occasionally, but use the forums on the website http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum even more (it covers the fisheries I use when not at my cottage). Both websites I have found to be extremely informative and the guys are all really helpful. I have met several guys who are now good acquaintences on the water and have also increased my effectiveness as a fisherman.

Jim
 

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Since no one said it yet...........Head west!!!! Looking at the reports here Best fishing (catching) has been from Lorain (Beaver creek) to Toledo. Up your odds by headding to areas with better and more consistant reports of catching.

Also, Assuming you prefer to drift, It is easier to drift relativly shallow areas particularly while you are on the bottom of the learning curve. And there are more realitvly shallow fishholding areas to the west. Your chances of getting "in the zone" are better when you are fishing in 25-35 FOW than when you need to search 40 to 60 FOW.
 

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:) Go out of Mazurik on Marblehead and go due north in the slot between Kelley's island and South Bass Island until you are even with, or north of, the monument. Look for 29-30' of water and use bottom bouncers with harnesses and erie dearies.

Limited out twice in the last week or so. I would hit the water early as the bite generally fades about 10-11 am or so and you have to troll.

Hope this helps.
 
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