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NE Ohio River Carp On A Centerpin

Discussion in 'Carp Discussions' started by jojopro, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. Carp are a blast to catch! I personally think that they are the most fun fish to hook into in the rivers right now (since the steelhead are done). They aren't as explosive and as unpredictable as say steelhead or smallmouths, but they sure do have some shoulders on 'em. Carp are raw power and endurance, and make long hard runs when you hook into them and are slow to tire.

    I've been catching them in the rivers on my centerpin using corn. When I spot feeding carp or any area of water I'd expect to hold carp, I'll stand directly upstream of the area and then I'll throw in a handfull of corn to bait the area. I hook the corn directly onto the hook and trot it along slowly just like I would an egg sack for steelhead.

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    This fatty here was 32" long with a 26" girth (anyone know how much a carp like that would weigh?). When I set the hook on her she took off dowstream on a 200 yard run that I couldn't stop. She actually took me down to my backing, (I've never had a steelhead or any other fish do that). I ended up having to get out of the water and walk way down stream to finally land her. As I was bringing her in it was cool to see 8 smaller carp following her every move.

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    John
     
  2. Garyoutlaw77

    Garyoutlaw77 Rough Fish Ambassador

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    Nice catch John, I have yet to find a good formula to weigh/size Carp but that sure is a fat Lady!
    Just curious what style of hook are you fishing with ?
     

  3. This is from jojopro on another thread.
     
  4. TimJC

    TimJC Carp Angler

    Nice work.

    That big one was likely 22-24 pounds. I have data on a fish I caught that was 31 inches long and 25.5 inches in girth and weighed 21 pounds.

    There are formulas that will get you a rough estimation of the fish. L*L*G/1200 (measurements in inches yield weight in pounds) works very well for this purpose.