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mono, fluorocarbon, braided

Discussion in 'Tackle Talk' started by RWBlue, Jun 23, 2005.

  1. line vs. line vs. line
    I am trying to understand the differences between the different lines (mono, fluorocarbon, braided) and when it is appropriate to use each.

    Can someone point me to a site that compares the general qualities of each of these types of line?
     
  2. I think you already have a decent idea that each line type has its advantages in certain situations based on the way you worded your question.;) I am sure there are some articles on the net that are good at comparing them. Also, you may find a lot of OGF opinions if you search down through the threads in the "Tackle Talk" forum. There has been several discussions about them over the past year or so.

    Here is a brief comparison in my view. It will not cover all of my thoughts but it should get the discussion started.

    Braid's advantages include:

    • nearly no stretch which means great sensitivity
    • lasts for several years
    • Works great for jigging, worming, and any other situation where the bites are often light
    • Can achieve super high line strength and still keep castability
    Braid's disadvantages:

    • pricier to purchase although total cost of ownership is still low due to long life
    • low stretch can sometimes be a problem with shakeoffs/tearoffs (hook ripping from mouth)
    • line bouyancy in my case is usually a disagvantage in that it is tougher to get a light lure deep and staying deep.
    Mono's advantages:

    • inexpensive purchase price
    • stretch can be a plus in some cases. I still use it on casting crankbaits because fish seem to stick better on mono than braid
    • visibility is lower than that of braid
    Mono's disadvantages:

    • UV ray sensitive and therefore breaks down thus giving it a shorter life
    • stretch is disadvantage when working finesse type fishing
    • poor castability in higher test line
    Flourcarbon advantages:

    • low visibility
    • less stretch than mono
    • less bouyant
    Flourocarbon disadvantages:

    • similar to mono in disadvantages
     

  3. With all the searching and reading I have done on the internet you would think I would be the expert, but instead I think I am suffering from information overload because everyone wants to discuss the specifics of this brand vs. that brand.

    The way you laid out the positives and negatives is helping to get me straight.

    Can I get you to clarify a few items?
    When you say higher test, generally what weight are we talking about?

    If I am trolling from a canoe or small boat, I need some stretch to keep from yanking the hook out of the fish’s mouth, right?

    Line visibility will hurt me on clear lakes, but I don’t have to worry about it on most of Ohio’s muddy lakes and rivers, right?

    What type of fish or fishing is each line best suited for?
     
  4. I will try to answer your questions specifically based on my opinion.

    When you say higher test, generally what weight are we talking about?

    Obviously line will progressively become more difficult to handle as the line test increases. The point of manageability really becomes an issue of whether or not you can still do what you need to do. For instance tossing light panfish jigs will become very tough at 8-10# whereas if you are tossing medium size baits you may be comfortable up to 12-15#. If you are tossing larger plugs/baits for big fish (musky, cats, etc.) you may be okay using 20-25# test. The key is to only go with as heavy as you feel you need because the extra bulk decreases your effectiveness in many cases.





    If I am trolling from a canoe or small boat, I need some stretch to keep from yanking the hook out of the fish’s mouth, right?

    I know a lot of guys who troll the braids exclusively and are okay with it. I believe if you choose to troll with braids you better have a long softer action rod in order to use the rod's action to absorb the fish's energy. For casting medium size plugs/spinnerbaits I still use the mono because I feel I do not need nor want the non-stretch that braid gives me. Here again I believe you may get several varying opinions.





    Line visibility will hurt me on clear lakes, but I don’t have to worry about it on most of Ohio’s muddy lakes and rivers, right?

    Line visibility in my opinion does not impact a large number of the lakes within Ohio. However if you are tossing small baits in shallower water it does play more of a factor even though the lake may not be gin clear. If you are fishing an area that gets a lot of fishing pressure and your results are not as good as you would expect you may want to experiment with flouro.

    What type of fish or fishing is each line best suited for?

    I think the answer to that is more of what type of "fishing" rather than "fish" are best for each line. I think each type can have benefits in different situations for any species. What I generally use is braid (10#/2# diameter) for all of my panfish jigging and bass tube jigs. I also will use it for 'eye jigging as well. I have a setup with a baitcaster of mono 12# for tossing cranks and flipping/pitching, etc. I have another baitcaster setup that I use for tossing heavier cranks and big spinnerbaits. It gets more use in Canada (annual summer trip). This is primarily for pike but I use it for larger bass and walleye cranks as well. On it I have 50# Power Pro and that choice was made with the pike in mind. I have a couple of ultralight rods set up with 2 to 4# test line for panfishing. That makes up most of my gear. I do have a few other combinations that get less use.

    I hope my wife never finds out how many setups I have. She coule never understand why I needed more than one rod. I wouldn't have the guts to fess up to how many I really have.:eek:

    If I were to choose a setup for the most universal application, I would personally go with 10#/2# braid. It is very versatile and I do use it more than any of my other setups. I hope that helps some.
     
  5. You have no idea how much you have helped.

    I need another rod and reel combo. :)
     
  6. Okay, but just don't lay the blame on me for it.:p
     
  7. I am single, I don't have to blame anyone to get the toys I "need".

    I have two ultra-lights setup with 4# mono. These have proven good for crappies and small cats. (The 16 inch cats have been fun on these rods.)
    I have a Medium rod with 8# mono on it.

    I think I need an other medium with 10# braided on it. In OH I can use it as is to troll behind the canoe. When I take my trip to the boundary water, or back down to Cumberland, I can add a 4-6 ft leader on Fluoracarbon.

    What do you think? Have I got my bases covered for everything except the big cats?
     
  8. I got by for years using nothing but 4-8# line for all of my bass and panfishing. I even did a fair amount of catfishing for channels on them and it worked well. I would say the you are pretty well covered. It has only been in the last few years that I have begun to expand my options with gear. I think it really helps me but I could still have pretty decent success much of the time with the old method as well. It is just that I don't have the time to spend spinning my wheels at catching fish that I used to as a teenager so I like to try and get every advantage possible.