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MLB Steriod report = Yankees are cheaters!

Discussion in 'Sports Talk' started by Steel Cranium, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. Now I know why I hate the Yankees. Lots of Yankee names in the steroid report that was just released on MLB.com

    This proves it - they are cheaters!
     
  2. Perch

    Perch Perch Addict

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    Gosh Id hate to be the guy that did that report, he must have one hell of a security team.......
     

  3. There's a lot of names in the report... from all the teams. LOTS of Indians too... It's everywhere...
     
  4. Most of them seem to have a connection with each other: He had a locker next to.... He was referred by.... Not too many 'big' names on the Indians. Mostly guys who were on a lot of teams. Lots of Reds too, but journeyman as well. Seems like many were guys that were average, looking for an edge or older guys trying to extend the career.

    I'm a bit suprised that Kenny Lofton wasn't in the list. Any guy that can play at that level in his 40s is a freak. Good to see that he wasn't there.
     
  5. Just think of how many aren't listed. I breezed through the report but don't remember seeing Brett Boone. Hits 10-15 hrs a year with the Reds...goes to Seattle and hits 20-35. Some of these guys are crazy if they think us fans couldn't tell something was up. What shows you the depth of the problem is the Yankees. Here is a team that could and does buy the best players and they still had to do the juice. Personally I could care less, hell let them all do it juiced pitchers with juiced hitters give them aluminium bats too. When it cost me $400 to take a family of 4 to a game which in part is a result of the bigger salaries that steriod users caused that pisses me off . They are all to blame, owners/players/unions/trainers/espn. I hope baseball comes back down to earth with this report and makes it what it really is A GAME.
     
  6. What about Brady Anderson, who spent most of his career with the Orioles?

    Up to 1995, best year was 21 home runs. 1996, 50 home runs. 1997, 18 home runs in more games played than 1996 (?). Nothing fishy here. Never hit more than 24 after that.

    This only scratches the surface...
     
  7. Tee

    Tee Team OGF

    Seems there is alot of this going around.....

    http://www.thepittsburghchannel.com/news/11128398/detail.html


    !%
     
  8. flathunter

    flathunter Mellons mentor

    Clemons was named like 90 some times on the report..I say ban him from the hall of fame and erase all his stats forever.
     
  9. That's a very good point...just another reason why I'm glad that I dislike the sport.
     
  10. chaunc

    chaunc Staff Member

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    Guys, remember.... it wasn't illegal back then.
     
  11. chaunc

    chaunc Staff Member

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    Guys, remember.... it wasn't illegal back then. Count the people in that report who tested positive AFTER steroids were banned from MLB. And how many are still in the league. I always felt that there were way more people juicin than Bonds and Giambi.Those are just the guys the media wanted to harass. Bonds never said he didn't do steroids. He said he didn't know at the time they were steroids. WHAT-EVER ! :D
     
  12. I totally agree when they say that everyone in MLB needs to take responsibility for this mess. The owners turned their back on the issue years ago which led to more juicers. Then as it worsened many players I am sure felt that they needed to follow suit to remain competitive or in some cases to even stay employed in the league. Look at that list and notice how many names are guys you barely even heard of. I am sure that it would have been far too tempting to guys to juice when they knew they may soon be out of the game altogether, all the while knowing that guys above them were using it to beat them out. Trainers and doctors kept their mouths shut for all these years as well because their pockets were being lined.

    No doubt it is a big black mark on the game but I don't view this report as really changing the overall picture of baseball. I think we have been enlightened enough in recent years that it had gone on. This report may just simply put some more faces to the problem. Baseball will survive. It always does. Remember it is truly America's pastime. Everyone said they were done with watching the game back when the players struck in the early/mid-nineties. Along comes Ripken with his pursuit of Gehrig and the McGwire/Sosa race. Suddenly baseball is back at the top of the sports focus, and in a good light. Then the stories broke about McGwire with the Andro and guys claimed to again be done with the game only to see it climb back to huge popularity. The same will happen again. Yes some guys will forever turn their back to the sport as spectators but there will still be a huge following. I don't like the image it has created but I know I will remain a Tribe fan and a baseball fan. I grew up playing the sport and watching it and that will never change.

    As far as record books and asterisks, etc. that is all hogwash and everyone needs to let it rest. There are so many things about baseball that affect the records and steroids is but one of them. The owners, commissioner, players, and everyone else needs to look forward and get on with the game with the resolve that they will see to it that things are controlled from here on out to the best of their ability.
     
  13. Whaler

    Whaler Whaler

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    I'm sure most of the Steelers are on steroids. That's why they all have big heads ! LOL
     
  14. jeffmo

    jeffmo officially unofficial!!!!

    i could honestly care less!
    it's their bodies and their health.let them deal with the consequences when nature takes its course.
    there's bigger problems in our country.
     
  15. Bob Costas had a great idea. Make the first page of the record book an explanation of how baseball changed throughout the years, highlighting the different eras: big ballpark, all day games, scheduled doubleheaders, high mound, low mound, small ballpark, mostly night games, no scheduled doubleheaders (longer season), segregation, and steroids. Therefore, the reader can make their own decisions based on when the individual record was set.

    The home run record is one that is really three different events:

    Babe Ruth pitched as well as hit for some of his career and made trips in buses without medical enhancements that help current players recuperate much faster after injury.

    Hank Aaron set his record in an era where pitching was magnified. He hit in primarily large, pitcher-friendly ballparks with a higher mound during many of his productive years.

    Barry Bonds, enough said. If he didn't (allegedly) take the enhancers, he would probably have similar numbers to his closest early career competitor, Ken Griffey Jr.
     
  16. I like the Costas idea! Those examples are exactly the types of things I was referring to. It comes down to a lot more than just steroids impacting the stats from one era to another. The stadium design changes is one that affects so many facets of the game. The obvious one is the HR title but you also impact nearly every other hitting category as well (doubles, triples, hits, etc.) not to mention that it has caused a higher ERA for modern day pitchers.;) The more one studies the history of baseball the more obvious some of these factors become.

    It is pretty evident to most that Bonds' HR production was aided by performance enhancements of some type. How much? We will never know. Personally I still feel that he would have been at the top of the list at least of active players but maybe never surpassed Aaron. I think that aside from his increased strength he possessed an incredible bat control and eye at the plate. I feel some of this was a natural maturation and discipline. He put himself into the mindset of a power hitter and focused his game on power at that point and eliminated the spray hitter mentality altogether. I feel that along with the bat control and incredible eye would have increased his numbers over his career to a noticeable extent. We can't be so naive to believe that the steroids did it all or there would have been a lot more guys with huge inflated numbers at some point in their career.
     
  17. Paul Byrd is the only active player. Most others went to the Yankees or Mets, where they probably got involved with the trainers named as providers in the report.

    Jason Grimsley
    David Justice
    David Segui
    Glenallen Hill
    Ron Villone
    Chad Allen
    Mark Carreon
    Kent Mercker
    David Bell
    Matt Williams
    Steve Woodard
    Tim Laker (catcher, might be in AAA Buffalo at this point)
    Juan Gonzalez (was found carrying 'roids on a trip from KC to Toronto)

    The Byrd case will be interesting, since he's still active and has an excuse for some drugs, due to a medical condition that is often treated by HGH-type drugs. His problem is that he purchased over $20k at one time.
     
  18. BKR & SC make some good points. It is true that there are lots of factors affect the record books, but most of them except for the personal choice to use Performance Enhancing Drugs to gain an advantage only affected that (or those) individual. The juiced/dead ball, night/day games, larger/smaller parks, higher/lower mounds affected all players of that time. Personally I think Bonds would have been a great player without steroids, but would not have even been close to Ruth or Aaron HR totals. He only hit 84 HRs in his first four years in the majors, but he only weighed about 175 lb. With the help of PEDs the strength he gained by adding 40 lb of muscle had to have had a huge impact. Lots of fly ball outs turn into home runs.

    Griffey Jr. (who reportedly has not used any PED's) may have passed both Bonds and Sosa if he had juiced to bulk up and recover more quickly from his many injuries. He's one of my favs so I'm glad he didn't, even though he will probably finish at best 4th all-time. Personally I will always place an * next to players like Bonds records.

    Tim
     
  19. Yea Yankees have some cheaters, but like BIG daddy says, there are many if not all teams that have them. That Senator that did this report has ties to Boston ( hymn). More names will surface from all over. It will just dilute Barry Bonds being a cheater now.

    You and I ( taxpayers) are being charged over $ 50 million dollars so far to tell us that there are many great players using Steroids when we knew it already!
    Didn't everybody already know this? Why is anyone surprised here?

    What a joke of an investigation and our money! This senator is just looking for his 15 minutes of fame. In the mean time he gets to fly around the country and interview baseballs star athletes while making Big bucks

    Please!