Ohio Game Fishing banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,833 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone tell me what insects just hatched in mass on the GMR starting Sunday? I have lived here 7 years and have never seen this... there are billions of them. They don't come out until dark and then just swarm everywhere but never touched/landed on me. Lights on bridges crossing the GMR are just plain scary.

Should I consider matching the hatch for these when targeting smallmouth? I saw no signs of fish going after them.

BTW - Fishing was just OK last night. Waded about 1 mile and got into a fair number of dink smallmouth but nothing of note.
 

·
Team Fatty
Joined
·
1,258 Posts
i was out a few nights ago, look like mayflies to me. sometimes they have late hatches and they usually hatch in massive numbers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,833 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
This is a picture of what I saw if it helps identify. They were dead and 2" deep below lights on bridges.



After looking at mayflies on wikipedia, I believe you correct. I guess they have never been that prolific here and don't think I have ever seen them in mid July.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I don't know about the bigger fish, but I have heard people swear you can't get a bluegill or crappie to bite for a good while after the mayflies hatch.
 

·
Multi Species Angler
Joined
·
6,191 Posts
Mayfly hatches are cyclical. They can have 10, 12, 13 yrs in a row with a weak hatch and then a boom year of millions of them. The cycles can vary to. In some places every other year is a boom year for them. In other places they go a long time in between boom years. Also, you can expect that most any fish would eat them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
I remember a very large hatch on the GMR about 6 years ago or so. They were all on the bridges and downtown. It was so bad you would slide on them like ice when you went to break. It seemed short lived though. Only a few days and they were gone, but there were swarms of them. If you looked at the river you could see every fish in the water was out getting them.
If you want to see a big hatch go to the great lakes or Canada, they have a big hatch about every couple of years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,038 Posts
They've been hatching bigtime on the Ohio river and the lower stretches of its tribs for a month or so. I've hit a couple pockets of them where they were crazy thick at night...And during the day the tree branches that border the river are droppy with weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Mayflies almost always have a massive hatch on the lower stretches of the GMR, but it is usually earlier in the year. Typically, they will be terrible in low light levels and settle down after dark at the Knightsbridge Dam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I was on the GMR Sun. night as well and saw the critters. I`m sure they are mayflies, having witnessed the same thing at Lake Erie a few weeks before. They don`t seem to be as large as the ones up at the Lake though. As far as the fishing goes I only caught 2 smallies but one was a 19 in. beauty that busted a buzzbait just b4 dark. I still use a old fashion camera so I cant post any pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
If you want to see a big hatch go to the great lakes or Canada, they have a big hatch about every couple of years.
My sister lives near Lake Huron - when they hatch up there you go outside and the whole front of the house is covered with them. I don't know how often they have a big hatch up there, but I remember witnessing a few of them over the years - the Michiganers call them fish flies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
The bugs you're seeing are mayflies, specifically they are white millers, aka white fly or sometimes coffin fly (Ephoron leukon spp). This is a critical hatch (technically 'emergence') on the Susquehanna River. Yes, this is a good opportunity for a fly fisherman - or a spin fisherman who's willing to put a small white popper behind a larger lure or casting bubble. Chances are good that fish are taking the spinners (a spinner is what you call the mayfly after it's emerged and mated and dropped eggs - the dying animal settles onto the water) late at nite and very early in the morning - fly fishermen with a love for carp on a dry fly should pay attention.

this is a strong indication of the quality of the water. These insects require clean and well oxygenated water.

During the late afternoon and early evening try fishing a nymph with a slightly active retrieve. Around dawn you can sometimes do well fishing a soft hackle wet fly in a dead drift manner to imitate the drowned adults or spinners. And look for "clooping" carp sucking the dying bugs from eddies and slack water areas. Also catfish.

Joe C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
I don't know if they were mayflies or not but on my drive home (springboro to troy) yesterday evening on 75 my windshield was covered with bug goo. Everyone was washing their windshield. It never is like that.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top