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Lip Question

Discussion in 'Tackle Making' started by walleyevision, Feb 17, 2008.

  1. Up to this point I have been installing my lips before I apply the devcon 2T. Does anyone install their lips after applying the epoxy? If so I was thinking of trying it that way to avoid any epoxy on the lip. Any and all tips appreciated.
     
  2. Walleye - I started out with full paint and lip install before applying the first coat of D2T, but have gradually drifted to, paint, one coat of D2T, glue the lip in and apply second coat D2T, which fills in the gaps around the lip as well. This means you may need to put a false lip in or clean the slot before you can install the lip, which when you get used to it, is O.K. pete
     

  3. I do it the way Pete described the process. Carve the bait, seal it with sanding sealer, prime it, one coat of epoxy, then paint (with a plug in the lip slot to prevent getting paint in there)...seal again, install lip with Devcon, seal again and cover the Devcon around the lip again.

    By not having the lip in the bait until the very end, you reduce the risk of getting anything on it.

    As to the install process, don't put on more than you need when you install the lip. After a while, you get the hang of putting just enough Devcon on the lip to have it ooze about 1/8 of an inch all the way around the lip slot. I like to have the lip covered about 1/8 of an inch because it add strength to the lip/wood junction.

    If you build smaller baits such as bass and walleye, you should probably not use more than two coats of Devcon or Envirotex Lite (I'm referring to the body of the bait, not the lip install process) because the weight of the epoxy could affect the action and/or the bouyancy. On musky baits, three final coats of Devcon on the body is a minimum because of the teeth and the stresses of high speed trolling, etc.

    I'm currently using Envirotex and I'm putting no less than 5 coats on the bait or 4 thicker coats.

    To prevent epoxy getting on the lip, you might also consider placing masking tape over the area toward the leading edge of the lip so that you can handle that portion with less chance of contaminating the lip surface.

    For what its worth, I know of no way to remove epoxy from a lip effectively without marring the crystalline look of the lip. I've heard different ideas, but none of them seem to work for me without marring the lip clarity.

    So...I try to take my time and I use the 30 minute Devcon for lip installation, instead of the 5 minute stuff, so I'm not hurried. The 5 minute stuff is too fast for my fat fingers.:D
     
  4. Thanks VC and Hazmail. I will give the masking tape a shot. I havent gotten alot of epoxy on my lips just a small spot occasionally that I want to avoid.

    I use the 30 minute for lip installation too, takes me longer than 5 minutes to convince myself its straight!:D