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Ranger188
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Don't know why his article would stir up any pot,it's one man's opinion obviously not shared by many.
 

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Wish there was a "like": button! Organizational post release mortality should be a real concern to bass angling groups.

The unknowns will be exploited in the future with advances in technology and some good scientists. One thing for sure- harvested basses swim no more...

The linked study up North doesn't reveal much other than a need of further research. Much of the study actually could be argued towards success of long distance migrations even from single release site. Rather huge sampling with sub par returns. Love the dumb fish that were recaptured multiple times...

Hoping indeed Ohio moves forward with good long term evaluations. Look forward to being a part of it if offered!

Thanks for the share JP
 

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If you do not think mortality is a problem you are totally wrong. I fished the 1st time as a co-angler in the Everstart series back in early 2000. I watched Everstart give two giant trash (55 Gallon +) cans full of dead smallmouth to 2 guys at the weigh in. I bet a big majority of the rest of the fish died too. The reason is that anglers either do not care or forget to check to see if any water is in their livewell from hitting all the waves. Most people that year went to Pele so they were making long runs. I fished again as a pro and had seen better but still concerning results. Even when I fished B A S S they put them in a release boat but when they are de-scaled you know they are not going to make it. I had a event a couple years ago up at Sandusky bay for my anglers only. It took like 22lbs to win. I bet 10% of those fish survived. They had no scales were red all over even some had puncture marks from fins. I will never ever have a tournament like that again up there! If I keep it to largemouth only they seem to be in much better shape due to not having to run so far. That is not the only problem up there by any means the charter boats helped for many years too. I watched Ruggles get decimated. When DNR cut Walleye limits the charters looked for something else to fish for. (Bass) Needless to say many of them went to a frying pan. These are just a few things that impact our fishery there are many more. I am actually meeting with DNR tonight about Bass in Ohio and what we can do to improve some of our fisheries. I hope something will come out of this I am sick of fishing in this state! A lot of lakes could use some help!
 

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Ranger188
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I didn't mean it to sound as though I don't share the same concerns.What I meant was that judging from the huge TX's all around the country where anglers drive their boats hundreds,yes hundreds of miles from the launch site,I don't see much (in print anyway)from BASS or FLW addressing this problem.The winner in an open earlier this year on Lake St.Clair actually drove his boat on a 320 mile round trip to win the tournament,many of the elite anglers last week were driving well over 100 miles round trip as well.I know some of the big TX's down on the lower Mississippi River,and the Red River 150-200 mile round trips each day are the norm.Even if there wasn't a significant number of bass that die from long rides in livewells,there would almost certainly be a very,very high displacement issue.There's most likely a good reason to the bass why they don't live near the launch ramp,they live where they live because they have everything they need to survive in that area,when they're taken miles and miles away from that spot and dumped into unfamiliar waters something has to give.I don't know what the answer is,but I doubt if the big circuits are going to quit holding tournaments on large bodies of water any time soon.I guess all that can be done at the present time is to incorporate stiffer penalties at the weigh-ins that would force anglers to take better care of their fish.I know we've had 6 tournaments on Lake Erie so far this year,and we haven't had a single dead bass yet,but I do have to admit that's only from the livewell to the weigh-in table then released back into the lake,what happens after that I really don't know.I do believe that of the bass being caught from around Pelee Island very few,if any,make it back out there.Think about the upcoming Bass Open out of Sandusky,probably 80% of the field will fish either Pelee,or the Canadian mainland shoreline.After three days of competition,and three days of boaters and non-boaters bringing their catch back to Sandusky,how many of the fish that do survive will ever make it back to their natural territory.I fish many TX's on Lake Erie,and Lake St.Clair,I don't plan on cutting back any time soon,so I surely hope somebody does come up with some solid ideas to help minimize whatever damage may be occurring to the bass population.
 

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Amen Harbor Hunter. I met with DNR last night to see what if anything we can do to help some of our waters in need of some TLC. They are doing studies etc and actually are putting an effort into bass. The only problem is that as of now there is absolutely no solution other than what you have already seen such as creel limits (Salt Fork) seasons closed like at lake Erie. I would love to see stocking but they swear to me that it will fail. The only thing we can do as anglers is to make sure we do not loose any fish in our care. We already practice catch and release! We do our part but we can do more. A 4-5 Lb fish could be 8-14 Yrs old. I have lost a few over the years but I am constantly monitoring my fish in the livewell and I am anal about the fish care system for the circuit. I am very lucky to have had Steve Kirby do our fish care system it is state of the art. This is not the problem we have in the state of Ohio but it is something that we can control! I am frustrated that there is no answers or quick fixes for our problems. We as anglers just want to do something to make the fishing better in waters that need it. I would like to see some of those fish care systems like at Indian lake. For those who do not know what I am talking about there is a shelter house across from the Moundswood Ramp that has a self contained fish care system in it for tournaments to use. It is also next to the water and that is nice. We got a whole new ramp at Alum at the new Galena Access. It is really nice! Except we cant do our weigh in by the water anymore. I have seen most tournaments including ours 100-200 yards from water. These are little things that would help smaller organizations without the fish care systems as well.
 

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Alum-

The several winter meetings DOW held annually for front guys of the bass scene were very insightful. After a few years, attendance became lacking and they kinda went away.

The science, studies and data presented really made a lot of sense as they further developed regulations that are now active at this day and age.

It appeared after numerous years of them gathering everyone they were headed in a direction of further evaluations of post event mortality.

They didn't have one last year- rouse up your contact to re-gather us again!

Dead fish penalties outside of the norm will result in better field care- we DQ at any electric events for deceased fish. A FULL pound in NOAA...results in more angler efforts towards their fish care during the day.
 

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I know. I chose not to come due to I am around some of the guys at DNR and I always tried to stay in touch with what was going on. Scott wants bass guys together again in Feb for a Bass Summit. I don't know what we can do but I game for anything that could help our experience on Ohio waters.
 

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The several winter meetings DOW held annually for front guys of the bass scene were very insightful. After a few years, attendance became lacking and they kinda went away.
Not trying to make a scene-just provide a fact. When we apply for permits we have to give our contact info to the individual parks. They could collect names of the BASS CLUB members that make up ALOT of the tournament permits applied for. Some bass clubs need a little education on fish handling, either when first captured or throughout the day and at weigh-in.

I'd like to see us all come together on this issue to get great fishing for all in the future. Inland lakes in Ohio rarely if ever get an out of state vehicle in the parking lots unlike other states like Michigan, N.Y., or PA. and those are just northern states!

We can get 60 to 100 bass fishermen to pay money to fish for these green & brown fish, but we can't make an effort to get together on most or any of our natural resource issues.
 

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I know our club was not contacted. We have been applying for permits for around 8 to 10 years so and we've been around since 1976 so...I hope they make an effort again also.
 

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The first invites there was around 50 emails in the cc of what I received, that was in 07' I think, it tailed out after the first few years...

Get me your contact info Buzzking for front person of your club- if DOW decides to go again I'll be sure to get them the info.

Rich Carter was a presenter at all four meetings I attended- he now heads the inland fisheries- contact him direct via email links on ODNR let him know of growing interests again.

Good stuff!

nip
 

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I have had the same talk with the odnr. They are against stoking bass. They say it dose not work. I think Texas, Alabama, and many other states would disagree. When I was the conservation officer for a BASS club I was in I tried to get them let us stalk bass fingerlings at one of our opens like they do in Alabama. We were going to buy the fry. They would not let us do it. In Alabama they use tournaments to help stock lakes that need it. They give a bag of fingerlings to every boat in the tournament. They put it in there live well then dump the bag at there fist place they stop and fish. They say we need cover instead of stocking. Lake Erie is not exactly full of cover but it is full of bass. I don't know why they don't increase the size limit state wide. Bass fisherman spend more money than other anglers and most states understand that and try to make there bass lakes better. But not Ohio. Maby we need to put some pressure on the odnr with an email or petition campaign.
 

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I don't want to start an argument ........ but it's not as simple as stocking bass. If the lake you put them in isn't going to support them, it's a waste of money. And what about competing species? In a southern lake a bass is pretty much top dog. The only thing it has to compete with, is other bass. In northern lakes they have to compete with walleye, pike, and musky. Southern lakes have longer growing seasons not only for bass, but for their prey as well.

As far as the states that Buzzking mentioned ..... all of those states have a closed season on bass. If you want to increase the number of bass, put a state wide closed season on them during the spawn. Or....... do it on an individual lake basis like they do with length limits. There are actually some lakes that have too many bass in them and it's causing slow growth rates. Mosquito Lake is one that instantly comes to mind.

And it could also be the fact that the bass are there, but we just can't catch them. A case in point would be West Branch reservoir. You can fish that lake for the whole day and struggle to catch a limit of bass. You can go out two days later and you can catch a limit in an hour. Just because we don't always catch them, doesn't mean they aren't there.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Glad to see that our best bass tournament directors here in Ohio keep conservation of our precious fisheries as their top priority!!! Managing bass in Ohio is a very complex topic and we all have our own beliefs (I too am a firm believer in having a closed season). We must remain active with communicating our concerns with DOW and trust their knowledge and experience in their field. Mr. Balog said it best..."What happens to the stars of the show when the lights go out and the curtains fall?"
 

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Not all lakes need stocking. But there are many lakes in Ohio that are way over fished and stocking would help. Ohio stocks musky Saugeye walleye trout and others but not bass. I don't know if it is true today but a few years ago in bass master magazine they said Ohio had more bass fisherman per capita than any other state. But it feels like the odnr takes that for granted. I have fished tournaments in many other states and trust me they appreciate all the money that bass tournaments bring to the local economy. Also it is not just a sothern thing. Michigan Indiana Penn New York Kentucky and Minnesota all have better bass lakes than Ohio.
 

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It is just in the planning process now but it looks like there will be a meeeting in Feb. When I have more info it will be posted.
 

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I have mixed feelings on this subject. Talking to a FLW pro his thoughts got me thinking. When we move these bass we also move their DNA which allows more of a mix through out the lake. Bass are like all animals, mixing up the DNA could create a stronger breed of bass. Like dogs/ horses to much inbreeding creates problems within the bloodline. Proper handling is the key.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Ohub Campfire mobile app
 

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Ol Joe Balog must not have any problem with tourney fishing Lake Erie since he's up there giving fish a good boat ride this weekend. Go IKE!
 
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