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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Just wondering if a boat/kayak/canoe or some type of watercraft necessary for decent fly fishing locally? How much easier will it be with some type of boat? For wading are there things I need to worry about like snakes, leeches, or other nasties? Are waders necessary this time of year?

Sorry for the silly questions. I'm a former city slicker trying to get in to fly fishing.

Larry
 

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The boat/kayak/canoe is up to you, there are plenty of places to wade, open up google maps, find a park with a river or lake and have at it.

You don't need waders right now as the water is plenty warm but you should know a bit about the water you are planning to wade such as safe flows, where the deep holes are and the water quality. Snakes, leeches, tics and flying things that bite you need to be aware of but you shouldn't run into anything that is poisonous around here. Always check for tics and leeches when you get done and if you get poison ivy make sure you wash off when you get home.
 

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I don't use waders on hot days, just quick drying shorts. I bought a cheep pair of wading boots and neoprene socks with gravel guards to keep stuff out of my boots and off my ankles. A lot of people just use there old tennis shoes but I wanted more support for hiking and didn't want damp smelly shoes laying around. You can also buy quick drying pants that have zip off legs to help protect against poison ivy and ticks. A lot of the paces I go I have to "wade" through brush and weeds to get in the water. I've never had a leech but have seen ticks. I've also seen plenty of snakes but they usually go the other way. Take slow deliberate steps even if you can see the bottom. Some of those holes are a lot deeper than they look. If you can't see bottom be careful, use a stick or wading staff. The river I mostly fish on a good day only has about a foot of visibility and holes that are 5 or more feet deep off a ledge that's only inches deep. Also if your not going with a partner make sure someone knows where you are going and when you will be back. Make sure your keys and cell are in water tight zip locks or containers. You wouldn't believe how many people soak their phones or keys in Mohican and then get upset at the livery operators.
 

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Streams, in my opinion, are easier to wade and fish unless they are really deep. Lakes/ponds/backwaters are easier for me to fish from my kayak because the casting is virtually wide open and you can cover a lot of water with very little effort. My fishing kayak is the single best outdoors-related investment I have ever made. I've had it everywhere from the Hocking River to lakes, ponds, and the Atlantic Ocean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you don't mind my asking what type of kayak do you use for fishing? Can you carry it on top of a car? Can one person get it in and out of the water and back on to the vehicle you use to carry it?

Thanks!
 

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If you don't mind my asking what type of kayak do you use for fishing? Can you carry it on top of a car? Can one person get it in and out of the water and back on to the vehicle you use to carry it?

Thanks!
I have a truck and transport it in the bed with a bed extender, by myself, no issues at all. I am using a cheaper Future Beach brand kayak from Dunham's, I think it's an Angler 146 or something like that, a 13'6" sit on top kayak. I paid $400 for it and have zero regrets. It covers water fast, paddles easy, and is very stable. Like I said, I have been in everything, basically, including the surf in NC and SC, and have never had an accident or tipped or anything like that.
 

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If you can spring for one, a boat is an huge asset for the fly angler. No worries about private property, bank access, or room to back cast. When fishing rivers you can always bail out and wade. I find that trying to fight the current and manage a fly rod can be a little too much sometimes.
 

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I have a NuCanoe Frontier which offers some of the best stability for a hybrid canoe/kayak. It has a wide deck and few things to catch your line on.



They are not cheap but I don't think I will ever need to upgrade.
 

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There are poisonous snakes (copperheads) in OH, but they are mostly in the Southeastern part I have never encountered one in central. There are Massasaga Rattlers and Timber Rattlers but they are both on the endangered list (I have never seen one in my 47yrs). Bug spray helps with mosquitoes, deer fly and keeps the ticks to a min. Carry some packets of salt in your vehicle in case you pick up a leach. I have only had that happen once. If you wade in tennis shoes, do yourself a favor and have a towel, dry socks and shoes for the ride home.
 

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I don't own a boat and likely will never own one again. Personally, I find a boat just adds hassle and expense to my hobby while the simplicity of wading enhances to experience for me.

You don't need waders in summer. After years of trying multiple combinations, I've found that shorts, wading boots and merino wool socks are the best combo for summer wading. The wading boots offer better traction and protection than sandals or tennis shoes and while it may seem odd to wear wool socks in the heat of summer they stay soft and cool and don't bunch up when wet.

Good luck with your time either in or on the water.
 

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I don't own a boat and likely will never own one again. Personally, I find a boat just adds hassle and expense to my hobby while the simplicity of wading enhances to experience for me.

You don't need waders in summer. After years of trying multiple combinations, I've found that shorts, wading boots and merino wool socks are the best combo for summer wading. The wading boots offer better traction and protection than sandals or tennis shoes and while it may seem odd to wear wool socks in the heat of summer they stay soft and cool and don't bunch up when wet.

Good luck with your time either in or on the water.
The simplicity of wading is a wonderful thing, where possible. There's nothing simplistic about wading a lake with steep banks and drop offs, though. :)
 

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If you don't mind my asking what type of kayak do you use for fishing? Can you carry it on top of a car? Can one person get it in and out of the water and back on to the vehicle you use to carry it?

Thanks!
I've got a trophy 126 (10'6") kayak. I have a Toyota Camry. I move the kayak by myself and carry it on top of my car. I've got a few scratches on the roof from before I started throwing a blanket between the kayak and the roof. I use two tie downs and two foam pads like this: http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/3650...ferralID=cc9ef924-fabc-11e2-9389-001b2166c62d

You don't have to buy the foam pads though...just go to some craft store and get them cheaper.
 

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The simplicity of wading is a wonderful thing, where possible. There's nothing simplistic about wading a lake with steep banks and drop offs, though. :)


Seems simple enough to me:)
 

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I will normally wet wade in 50 degree water as long as ambient temperature is in the 70's.....but only if its easily to wade without steep banks and such. If there is a lot of deep holes and mud banks and bottom only a fool will do such a thing as it is inviting the inevitable.
Just yak it cause its helva a lot easier and you can cover more water and can paddle back as long its not to fast.
 
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