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Interesting Bluegill Cancer

Discussion in 'Northeast Ohio Fishing Reports' started by Agent47, Jul 7, 2007.

  1. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    Well , Fished Friendship Lake today and did decent on the panfish using leech and dugworm on twister but whats interesting is one of the fish I caught.
    Friendship is an old strip mine hole out in the country and is very very clean. It is 1 of the cleanest lakes in Ohio as nothing is around or feeds it that is effected or polluted. Today I caught the Gill you see in the picture and I noticed a tumor growing from its left fin. I found the article below to be interesting and possibly an answer to this situation but I am unsure. The only thing introduced to this lake is run off from cars that take a small road to a nearby park and race track or stuff people decide to leave on the bank. Anyone else have any ideas??

    1Cancer Research Centre and Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    2Faculty of Fisheries

    Abstract
    A global epidemiological study on the frequency of skin papillomas among various flatfish species (Pleuronectids), papillomas of eels and the virus induced lymphocystis disease has revealed particular distribution patterns. Skin papillomas are prevalent among at least 20 flatfish species of the northern Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, and Japan Sea but appear to be absent from the Atlantic, North Sea, and the Caribbean Sea. The opposite is found for lymphocystis, which is common among flatfish species off the Atlantic shores of Europe and North America. Similarly the skin papillomas of eels are restricted to a relatively small region along the European coast extending from the Baltic countries to Denmark, Germany and Holland. Superimposed on this global distribution pattern are local variations in tumor prevalences which can vary from about 58% to 0.01%. The geographic distribution pattern points to the existence of areas around the globe in which flatfish or panfish are able to develop skin papillomas. Outside these areas of potential skin papilloma risk, flatfish and eel populations are not afflicted with papillomas even if they inhabit estuaries or rivers with a high man-made or naturally-occurring pollution.

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  2. I've seen that same growth on many of my aquarium fish. At first, I thought it was a tumor or disease of some sort, so I tried medicating the water. The medicine never seemed to work. What I did notice though, is that after several weeks after I quit using the medicine, the tumor would get small and eventually go away.

    Then one day, I had to move one of my new saltwater fish from a quarantine tank to my mini-reef tank. As I was doing this, one of its pectoral fins became entangled in the net. After I released it into the tank, I noticed a small amount of damage right around the base of the fin. Sure enough, a week later a tumor had grown around the area. I didn't medicate the tank, because most aquatic medicines contain copper, which would have killed all of the corals and other invertebrates in the tank. To my suprise, a week or two later, the fin was healed and the tumor gone.

    From then on, I never used another net to move a fish. Instead, I use a clear plastic cup so I can scoop up the fish and not damage its body. And guess what? No more tumors. So I would bet that the fish you caught had some type of damage to its pectoral fin and that this is just a normal healing process for fish. Obviously, I could be way off on this, but I think its a good guess.
     


  3. I think your right.
     
  4. Agent47

    Agent47 Trying to pull it in!!!!

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    makes sense.....