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identify this fossil

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by hardwaterfan, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. hardwaterfan

    hardwaterfan Twinsburg, OH (NE OH, northern edge of Summit Co.)

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    ive had this fossil laying around for a couple years now. i found it at a construction site where they were excavating layers of what looked like sandstone/siltstone layers. i happened to see this little baby before it got ruined. didnt find anything else though, although if you look close its in a layer with lots of little fossils. unfortunately the rock is beginning to crack. and the fossil itself also has a crack.

    can anyone identify the species and date this fossil? I bet its at least HUNDREDS of years old. ;)

    Oh yeah, the fossil is about 3" long.
     

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  2. trilobite is my guess. One of the more common finds I believe. Nice specimen.
     

  3. Try contacting the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. I don't think it's a trilobite...
     
  4. Hetfieldinn

    Hetfieldinn Staff Member

    I would put JB Weld on the other side of the rock (fossil) to keep it from coming apart.
     
  5. It is a Trilobite it just don't have its head!
     
  6. Juls

    Juls Charter Captain

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    http://www.trilobite.com/
    There's lots of pictures of them found at the link above. Looks like that's what you got, all right....Your fossil could be as old as 600 million years.... cool!
    Nice find!

    Juls
     
  7. hardwaterfan

    hardwaterfan Twinsburg, OH (NE OH, northern edge of Summit Co.)

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    thats what i thought too when i first found it until i started looking through all the trilobite pics i could find, it just doesnt look like any trilobite pic ive ever seen.

    trilobites have 3 lengthwise body segments and mine only has 2 unless you count the thin recessed area going down the middle of its body. also, no trilobite pic ive seen shows the 2 lines bisecting each of the two larger body parts going down the length of each half of the fossil body.

    im unconvinced....but that might just be ignorance.

    i appreciate everyones comments, i know nothing about fossils.

    i like the webiste, to think that trilobites were the dominant species on Earth hundreds of millions of years ago truly boggles the mind! :)
     
  8. hardwaterfan

    hardwaterfan Twinsburg, OH (NE OH, northern edge of Summit Co.)

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    thanks everyone for your input.... i hope you all enjoyed the mystery of this fossil as much as i have.

    this is some of the scraps that i found around the net....AMAZING.

    Conulariids have been the subject of speculation for a century and a half. They aren't that uncommon; there are a number of genera, and they ranged from the Middle Ordovician to the Triassic. There are even a few cases in which conulariid soft parts have been preserved. Nonetheless, exactly what they were is still not settled. Because of their fourfold symmetry, they have often been placed in the Cnidaria by analogy with the fourfold Scyphozoa. However, their skeleton was very different from anything known in the Cnidaria, and they may represent a separate, extinct phylum, probably triploblastic. (See Babcock, 1991 for a defense of the separate phylum hypothesis, and Van Iten, 1991 for a defense of the cnidarian hypothesis.)

    What can we say about conulariids? They had elongated, pyramidal exoskeletons, made up of rows of calcium phosphate rods. Most were square or rectangular in cross section, with prominent grooves at the corners. They lived attached to hard objects by a flexible stalk, and often lived in groups. Presumably they were filter feeders; how they reproduced is not known.
     

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  9. hardwaterfan

    hardwaterfan Twinsburg, OH (NE OH, northern edge of Summit Co.)

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    Some ancient creatures don't fit neatly into the groups scientists use to describe plants and animals. For 200 years, Conularids have been a classification nightmare for scientists. They have been variously classified as worms, mollusks, corals, jellyfish, and even chordates since their discovery. Scientists now agree that Conularids aren't closely related to any living organisms, and created the phylum Conulariida to accommodate them.
     

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  10. hardwaterfan

    hardwaterfan Twinsburg, OH (NE OH, northern edge of Summit Co.)

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    one last pic.
     

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  11. Trilobite missing it's head...

    I was a geology major a loooong time ago, and that's what it is...