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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Made a 2 day perch trip to Conneaut, Sunday 9/11 and Monday 9/12. With Double J and Mike, we did just fine on Sunday, with a 2.5 fish per lb ave, (60 lbs/150 perch) limit by 1030.

Monday turned out better for size with less than 2 fish per lb ave. (69 lbs/120) fish. To do that, it took throwing back any healthy (no bleeding gills) perch that weren't over 9 1/2 inches long. If the smaller ones didn't swim right down, they were kept, or the weight would have been even a bit higher. Only about 4 inadvertently ended up in a sea gull belly...

To a Western Basin perch jerker, throwing back anything over 8" is almost painful, and something that is still hard to get used to!

Thanks to Double J and his buddy Mike for a good time Sunday and Capt Dave Caloren Monday for 2 more excellent trips! Since my first trip ever last summer, all 6 trips to Conny gave up limits of awesome perch and all in less than 3 foot seas.....Planning some tailgate fish fries in Columbus this fall.....

P.S.-To the guys who throw back dead fish to keep fishing for bigger ones, don't just blame the netters when the fishing declines.............
 

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Lure Junkie
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Like I always say...They all look the same once you clean em...
 

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I don't know how deep you're fishing, but I wonder how many of them that are brought up from 50' survive in the long run. not looking to start anything, but just wondering. seems like if their air sac is coming out of their mouth that would cause some problems. personally I keep pretty much anything the sea gulls can't get down. again, not looking to start anything, just always interesting to read other folks points of view.
 

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We caught some that had the bladders blown into their mouths and tried throwing back a few of the smallest ones while out of WW last week. 99% of them beelined it for the bottom ok.(Once we could detect they were smaller by how hard they pulled when first hooked, we slowly cranked them up thinking they may be throw-backs. The larger ones are quite detectable, and we didn't baby them.) Only a couple were also deeply hooked and fed the the birds. Since we were anchored in 42 feet on a fairly calm day, we never saw one re-surface, and yes, we looked for them.
I think it might have something to do with the TOTAL depth they are hauled up from, and how fast we crank them up! Another day, last year, in over 50 ft, we tried that and ended up keeping most of them since they couldn't answer the bell back to the bottom. Even though it's completely legal to cull them(per ODNR), I hate to waste even one when, with a little effort on my part, they can be returned to grow up to be jumbos!
 

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It's legal to throw back dead perch to keep larger ones?

Personally, by the time my son and I hit 60, I'm ready to go....
 

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11 dayz
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We caught some that had the bladders blown into their mouths and tried throwing back a few of the smallest ones while out of WW last week. 99% of them beelined it for the bottom ok.(Once we could detect they were smaller by how hard they pulled when first hooked, we slowly cranked them up thinking they may be throw-backs. The larger ones are quite detectable, and we didn't baby them.) Only a couple were also deeply hooked and fed the the birds. Since we were anchored in 42 feet on a fairly calm day, we never saw one re-surface, and yes, we looked for them.
I think it might have something to do with the TOTAL depth they are hauled up from, and how fast we crank them up! Another day, last year, in over 50 ft, we tried that and ended up keeping most of them since they couldn't answer the bell back to the bottom. Even though it's completely legal to cull them(per ODNR), I hate to waste even one when, with a little effort on my part, they can be returned to grow up to be jumbos!
I use a small hypo to peirce the bladder and that usally does the trick
 

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Made a 2 day perch trip to Conneaut, Sunday 9/11 and Monday 9/12. With Double J and Mike, we did just fine on Sunday, with a 2.5 fish per lb ave, (60 lbs/150 perch) limit by 1030.

Monday turned out better for size with less than 2 fish per lb ave. (69 lbs/120) fish. To do that, it took throwing back any healthy (no bleeding gills) perch that weren't over 9 1/2 inches long. If the smaller ones didn't swim right down, they were kept, or the weight would have been even a bit higher. Only about 4 inadvertently ended up in a sea gull belly...

To a Western Basin perch jerker, throwing back anything over 8" is almost painful, and something that is still hard to get used to!

Thanks to Double J and his buddy Mike for a good time Sunday and Capt Dave Caloren Monday for 2 more excellent trips! Since my first trip ever last summer, all 6 trips to Conny gave up limits of awesome perch and all in less than 3 foot seas.....Planning some tailgate fish fries in Columbus this fall.....

P.S.-To the guys who throw back dead fish to keep fishing for bigger ones, don't just blame the netters when the fishing declines.............
Tell me where you are heading next time so I can hook up next to you.....toss me your 9" rejects. I am happy to help you out.:D
 

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Some good fishing there John. They ran on the smaller side for us as well on Sunday(we fished next to you guys in the red Lund) The strong current was a pain in the butt making us pretty much fish out the back of the boat. Good day fishing nevertheless.
 

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Capt Jeff
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Its always a good time John with you and Jerry.We've gotta squeeze in at least 1 more trip and keep the streak going.Before you know it, I'll be trading the LUND for the HONDA FOREMAN to chase the walleyes! Glad you had a great weekend!:D:D

Snook...I agree that current out there was terrible and most likely affected our fishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The faster that they are landed, handled, unhooked and released, the less the swim/air/gas (whichever you prefer) bladder inflates. Then, I found that when I carefully aimed them from a couple of feet off the water so they hit the water nose first, their momentum and urge to flee allowed them to dive outta sight. If they didn't, we boxed them. By luck, none of the ones we scooped out of the water because they didn't dive were too small to clean.

As they gain depth, the change in pressure allows the air bladder to shriink back and their bouyancy to become reduced. What you see sticking out of their mouth is their stomach-not the swim bladder, which is under the spine and kidney and can't come out of the mouth.

The stomach is white/cream-colored and thick-skinned (like a balloon), while the swim bladder is usually silver and very thin (like a condom). To see the difference, do a dissection sometime.

I had hypodermic needles aboard but never needed to use them to deflate their air/swim/gas bladder. I have "fizzed" hundreds of them to keep in aquaria for use in research experiments while running O.S.U./Stone Lab at Put-in-Bay and know that, when done properly, it allows recovery and long-term survival. Done wrong, however and it will kill more than are saved.

Of course, the cooler the water, the friskier they are and the chances of recovery greater using any technique, but any perch with bleeding gills is most likely a soon-to-be dead fish.
 

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"how long did you hang around regarding the disposition of the throwbacks? "


AMEN.
 

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This is what you get with the limit on perch in possession. It is stupid, the perch are out of control and affect the walleye recruitment with their forage on small fry and fingerling walleye. Since the commercial fishermen on the US side of the lake were destroyed, the sportfishermen have not done their share to manage the balance of harvest of perch. Giving the perch to the Ontario commercial fishermen is a shame, along with the USA's import of 80% of seafood consumed here. With the price of gasoline for commuting and operating a boat out of sight, it makes only common sense for a family to fill their winter larder with fewer trips and expenses. Get over it, it is not conservation of our resources to squander a lot of gasoline for a few perch, end this "perch limit now".
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We were there from about 0730-1030, with no additional fish surfacing. No doubt, some delayed mortality could occur. For example, I see dead smallmouth bass with the black fungus outline of hand prints on them all spring in Put-in-Bay Harbor and walleyes that were "fizzed" improperly began to rise by the hundreds after the 1st Cabela's In-Fisherman Tournement there when it was begun as a live-release tournament.
 

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It's legal to throw back dead perch to keep larger ones?

Personally, by the time my son and I hit 60, I'm ready to go....
When I emailed the DNR on this topic, they responded positively. They said if the fish is "alive" (even with a blown bladder), it can legally be put back. I was not referring to culling from the cooler-though techically, I guess if the fish is still "alive", I guess it qualifies as a returnee-though I personally would not do that. If it "measures up" when I catch it, into the cooler! I have no problem cleaning 8"(even fat sevens!) perch.
ps-Some days, I'm ready to go way before a limit depending on the bite-and the waves! I don't have to limit to have had a good day of fishing Erie.
 

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Hey john i hope you read this. i see you are still into perchin. Pete andi miss coming up and doing a little fishing with you. I am retired now but pete is still at the main campus. don't get up to the lake much anymore. learned to saugeye fish locally and doing very well at it. can't get pete into the boat. i'll tell him i saw your post.

snuffy
 

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The faster that they are landed, handled, unhooked and released, the less the swim/air/gas (whichever you prefer) bladder inflates. Then, I found that when I carefully aimed them from a couple of feet off the water so they hit the water nose first, their momentum and urge to flee allowed them to dive outta sight. If they didn't, we boxed them. By luck, none of the ones we scooped out of the water because they didn't dive were too small to clean.

As they gain depth, the change in pressure allows the air bladder to shriink back and their bouyancy to become reduced. What you see sticking out of their mouth is their stomach-not the swim bladder, which is under the spine and kidney and can't come out of the mouth.

The stomach is white/cream-colored and thick-skinned (like a balloon), while the swim bladder is usually silver and very thin (like a condom). To see the difference, do a dissection sometime.

I had hypodermic needles aboard but never needed to use them to deflate their air/swim/gas bladder. I have "fizzed" hundreds of them to keep in aquaria for use in research experiments while running O.S.U./Stone Lab at Put-in-Bay and know that, when done properly, it allows recovery and long-term survival. Done wrong, however and it will kill more than are saved.

Of course, the cooler the water, the friskier they are and the chances of recovery greater using any technique, but any perch with bleeding gills is most likely a soon-to-be dead fish.
Not to drag this on but doesn't the air bladder put the pressure on the stomach to push it into their throats/mouths? Seems you have some first hand knowledge of this "degassing" and should post a picture or sketch to enlighten the OGF community on how it is done "correctly". If I knew how, I'd certainly(try to) do it. I've talked to Div3 Fisheries supervisor, Mr. Lacont, and he also told me if done improperly(the hyperdermic/pin treatment), it will prob. kill the fish.
Other e-search I've done seemed to say it <doesn't> work and if you see their stomach in their mouth, they are dead fish. I always equated the condition to approximately what happens when divers come up too fast and get the "bends"(which I know is somewhat different-nitrogen in the blood). As mentioned before, I've observed, if I reel them up steady, but slowly, they will dive and seem to be ok. Seems that around 30-35 feet or less, it doesn't occur, deeper than that, most of them have the condition of the blown out stomachs.
<<UPDATE/EDIT:>>
Well, I found it by googling and the link below tells how/why it happens, and how to "de-gas" the swim bladder:(prob. on here somewhere but the "search" feature gives way too much irrelevent info!)
http://www.leadertec.com/tipsandtechniques/Catch_release.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Next time I can get out, I will take a pic while fizzing a perch to show where to insert the needle. In the meantime, hopefully this will help those wishing to try it. I use a 16 gauge 1 1/2" hypodermic needle.

While holding the fish upside-down on the surface of the water (in a bucket or livewell), insert the needle 2-3 scale rows off center and 3-4 rows forward of the anal/genital vent at about a 30* angle and push it in only until air bubbles are released (deeper will puncture kidney,which lays along the underside of the spine). If the bubbles quit and the abdomen is still bloated, pull the needle out and check to see if it is clogged with skin tissue. If so, blow it out, then re-insert it into the same hole and finish.

With the bouyancy eliminated, the fish will then be able to immediately dive and swim away. In aquaria, recovery occurred within hours for the majority of perch given the procedure within the first 15 minutes of capture. Without fizzing, a higher percentage would die a slow lingering death from the exhausing fight to recover their balance and struggle to return to the bottom.

Once again, since there is little room for error, before trying fizzing, do a dissection first to learn where the other internal organs are to be able to avoid giving them a fatal wound. Fizzing done incorrectly is worse than not doing it at all, as it adds more trauma from handling, time out of the water and potentially fatal wounds that wouldn't occur without the procedure. That is why few wildlife departments endorse or encourage the practice.

P.S.- Poking a hole in their stomach is not helpful to their long-term recovery. It will retract on its own after pressurization is resumed at the bottom.
 

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Here's a sure fire way to prevent this pain and suffering, you guys in the deep end of the lake should just stop dropping minnows down into that deep water with a hook in them. Eventually the nice big perch will end up in the shallower western basin and we can all catch them there without this worry..........! HT
 

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The California Sea Grant published a paper that discussed the release of fish in deep water. Their study indicated that poking holes in fish to be released is not a good idea. Their preferred option was to get the fish back to depth as soon as possible. If it is an option do not remove the fish from the water.

One of their methods involved a larger barbless hook snelled upside down with a weight under it. The fish is hooked through the jaw and lowered to the bottom. When the line is retrieved, the hook slips out and the fish is free.

May not be practical with perch but I have not tried it.
 
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