close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

how long does it take

Discussion in 'Catfish Discussion' started by catfishhunter33, Aug 28, 2004.

  1. I would say at least twice as long in the Ohio. That is why some say they dont think a cat could get up over 100LBS in the ohio. But i think it can happen, just have to be a really old fish. If they hold up around a dam (and not get cuaght/kept) they could really grow off all those schools.
     

  2. catking

    catking Banned

    5,617
    6
    0
    I fish the Santee Cooper every year. To answer your questions- A 50 pounder in Santee is an 8 -10 year old fish at the most. On the Ohio river , probably 13-16 years old.........CATKING
     
  3. catking

    catking Banned

    5,617
    6
    0
    Nope- Not guessing. There was a place down in South Carolina, by the fish hatcheries, that explained the rapid growth of the cats down there. There were no blues in SC before 1968, which is 36 years ago? So the cats down there that are over 100 pounds , or close to it, are second/third generation cats, since cats have a life expectancy of 20-25 years in the wild TOPS. Sure some will live longer, but most do not. Life in the wild is rough :) . Flatheads in our lakes in Ohio live around 20 years also, some a little older. The biggest misconception is that the 70 pound cats are 50 years old. Not so at all. Blues in the Ohio river put on alot of weight , and with warm water discharges, plus the fact these cats thrive year round, they put on the weight quickly. Bottom line is, cats growth rate is fastest the first 10 years, then it slows.And their life span isn't nearly as long as some think. I read this in a Field& Stream Mag, which I still have. The rest I have a nice paper about cats in the Ohio and throughout the nation. Interesting..THE CATKING
     
  4. flathunter

    flathunter Mellons mentor

    Da King impresses me with his vast knowledge on all topics! :D
     
  5. catking

    catking Banned

    5,617
    6
    0
    The impact on cats down in the Santee Cooper isn't really bad at all. They commercially net blues every day. The fast growth rate, and the fact that the lakes are HUGE, really have minimal impact...SO FAR. But as the nation continues to grow ( doubling the population since 1970) it makes you wonder just where is the breaking point? There has to be one somewhere. CATKING