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Will Yak For Food
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I would guess Sonar, GPS and a terrific computer program to fill in the gaps. Or a geo-thermal sensing satelite. Can you imagine a geo-thermal mode on your GPS-Sonar unit. realtime displays of schools and bait-balls. Wow! (copyright2011Wow,all rights reserved)--Tim................................................................................................................................................................ Common chimpanzee Primate Forehead Human Snout
 

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I went to a Humminbird seminar a couple of years ago and they talked about this. Most of the ones that were out there was derived from whatever source that they could get. This meant that alot of them are not really that good. These same guys say that they work for someone, I'm not sure and the really good lakes were laid out with grids and driven with boats with very good equipment. They record these at certain water levels that can be corrected with your unit as needed. As you can tell, this is a slow process and only the good lakes are done first. That was a couple of years ago, I am sure that there may be a faster and better way now, who knows.
 

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I heard that ODNR hires Leebu (OGFer) to use his fish finder with side imaging sonar and double trolling motors to map out the lakes! :T

Seriously, they use sonar like what they use to find sunken ships and navigate subs. I've seen some updated maps on ODNR's website lately. They must be using new technology to update their old maps.

Some of the old maps for reservoirs are from the old topo maps before they built the dam.

I found an old map of Nimisila Reservoir the other day. It showed the proposed dams and the old road that are now under the lake. Maybe one day I'll try and find these old roads!
 

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The technology to do this includes the old topo maps, surveys and now a low frequency radar that has the ability to penetrate shallow water usually to a approximate depth of 45- 50 fow. Used with special equipment and software NOAA recently mapped the ENTIRE Eastern seaboard in 3 wks using 1 satalite and 15 persons; the updated maps were instantly available for use. It USED to take 20+ survey boats and hundreds of people and require close to 6 months, not counting distributing the new maps. An added bonus is this process shows the EXACT GPS locations of objeects bigger than 10` that are hazards to navigation for removal or demolition/ salvage.
 

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Powderfinger
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I found an old map of Nimisila Reservoir the other day. It showed the proposed dams and the old road that are now under the lake. Maybe one day I'll try and find these old roads!
For the most part you won't find the old roads. They are all silted in after 70+ years. You may be able to find East Nimisila Rd by the campground under all the lilypads in 1 fow and the bridge on the west side of the lake.
The foundation from the old farmhouse by the large island can be seen but that is not exactly a great spot to fish. There is also a roadbed between the grass islands that goes to the old farmhouse from the south dam.
I met an old guy who grew up in the farmhouse during a Nimisila spring cleanup back in the '90s. I pulled my map out and he drew alot of the structures and roads. Most are gone or not findable or his memory was a little foggy after all those years.
It would be interesting to see your old map. Does it have a year on it?
 

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The Army Corps of Engineers was surveying the West Harbor channel over several days this summer. I assume it's going to be dredged within the next few years. They were in a small steel rowboat with a GPS and a laptop and a depth sounder The driver just kept going back and forth across the channel, moving about 10' (I'm guessing) after each pass. I'm assuming they had a data gathering software that took readings on GPS position and depth at a selected interval.
During the two days that I was there they surveyed the main channel to the north of Anchors Away Marina, then the channel that runs from there to Gem Beach.
 

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Will Yak For Food
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For the most part you won't find the old roads. They are all silted in after 70+ years. You may be able to find East Nimisila Rd by the campground under all the lilypads in 1 fow and the bridge on the west side of the lake.
The foundation from the old farmhouse by the large island can be seen but that is not exactly a great spot to fish. There is also a roadbed between the grass islands that goes to the old farmhouse from the south dam.
I met an old guy who grew up in the farmhouse during a Nimisila spring cleanup back in the '90s. I pulled my map out and he drew alot of the structures and roads. Most are gone or not findable or his memory was a little foggy after all those years.
It would be interesting to see your old map. Does it have a year on it?
Last year somebody posted a site with old maps. I salvaged this one from 1904.--Tim

Map Atlas ....................................................................................................................... Furniture Table Desk
 

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1 disadvantage of using the old topography maps is often during construction the contours are altered. At CJ Brown, several of the RR bridge embuttments were lowered for boating safety, part of the southern half of the RR right of way was removed and there was extensive on site gravel mining for cement work and also for fill in the dam. Several yrs after completion the lake was again lowered to build the Marina and improve the old main boat ramp and several shallow humps were also lowered, once again for boating safety. Plus obviously wind/ wave action erosion occurs.
 

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The Army Corps of Engineers was surveying the West Harbor channel over several days this summer. I assume it's going to be dredged within the next few years. They were in a small steel rowboat with a GPS and a laptop and a depth sounder The driver just kept going back and forth across the channel, moving about 10' (I'm guessing) after each pass. I'm assuming they had a data gathering software that took readings on GPS position and depth at a selected interval.
When I was an undergrad we did a lake survey exercise as part of a fisheries class I took. We did about what you described here, except we didn't have a GPS I don't think. We had a map with the lake outline and then ran transects of the lake at a set speed while gathering depth data on the sonar. It was a plotter that printed the depth profile on paper so we could go back and manually add the depths in on the map once all the data was collected. That was back in 2001 though and with the sonar and GPS integrated now it's probably much easier.
 

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Apparently 2 summers ago? that low frequency radar satillite did the shallower parts and shores of Lake Erie in 6 hrs. It`s only real draw back is it can`t "see' a lot deeper than 50 fow.
 

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depending on what type of output your looking for depends on the equipment used, ive done alot of topographic surveys in my 14 years as a civil engineer designer in the field and behind the computer, topographic data can be taken using a total station (the guy that looks like hes taking pictures on the side of the road) with a rod, aerial, and special sonar equipment. Ive never used the sonar equipment but have seen it and it can produce very accurate detailed information or very broad low detail information (comes down to how much the client is willing to pay) after the field points are recorded, they are uploaded to special software and a terrain model is generated from the information taken in the field (this again will depend on what output and how much the client wants to spend). From the terrain model contours and other features are generated and outlined. Ive dealt with aerial digital terrain models the most, most was taken with a Wildcat 40 belly camera and is accurate to 1' at a flight elevation of 2500', the photos are put through special scanners and programs with base elevation information from control points established on the perimeter of the selected area, from this the digital terrain model is generated and then the contours are generated from that, example is the USGS map from above was generated along this line. ive topographed some creeks, streams and rivers by useing a total station and rod, wading and taking shots a predetermined distance between each shot unless a feature is noticed and needs to be more thoroughly defined. Also the contour interval is determined by what the client wants the output to be and how accurate they want the out to be, can range from .5' to whatever the client wants the intervals between contours to be, most use 1', 2', 5', 10' contour intervals. the newest thing is LIDAR which uses lasers and is very accurate and very expensive, a great example of this technology is anytime you get on a county GIS website to look at your property information, if the photo is very detailed and has a aerial photo date of 2009 or newer then its most likely LIDAR only a few companies in the USA have this technology.
 

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early 1900's were mainly done on the ground, i think some aerial work was done but gov. control, ill ask my old boss if any aerial was being done then, i do know that back then they used rods and chains for measuring.
 

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early 1900's were mainly done on the ground, i think some aerial work was done but gov. control, ill ask my old boss if any aerial was being done then, i do know that back then they used rods and chains for measuring.
The father of a friends of mine was a civil engineer, and he told me the reason some straight roads suddenly have a set of S curves is, they didn't compensate for the difference between true north and magnetic north, so every once in a while they had to bump the road back over to where it was supposed to run.
 

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yeah thats always funny to see and you can see it alot once you get out of town, it didnt take much to be off back then, but those old timers were also very accuracte and very knowledgable.
 

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name of Alex
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Another thing I like about old topos is the way you can see little towns that are now nothing more than an intersection in a city. For example, in Columbus, the corner of Kenny and Lane was called Seagrave. Or, before there was the Delaware Reservoir, there was Marlboro Church where the lake is now.
 

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yeah alot of people dont realize how useful those old USGS quad maps are when looking at lakes, they can show great detail of structure below the surface, i also pay attention to the contours 100' up from the bank which could indicate a point or drop off in the water from the bank...
 
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