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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Honestly I have never been there. friend of mine told me there are two larger piers and one smaller rectangular one in the middle. He also said you can basically drive your car onto any one of these and drive all the way to the end if you like. Basically I have two questions. First, is this in fact true? Second, is there any particular areas where the water is within 4 feet from bank. I'll be fishing for larger fish, and my longest net extends about 6 feet. Anything more than that and I wont be able to net the fish. Any info or answers are very appreciated.
 

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Honestly I have never been there. friend of mine told me there are two larger piers and one smaller rectangular one in the middle. He also said you can basically drive your car onto any one of these and drive all the way to the end if you like. Basically I have two questions. First, is this in fact true? Second, is there any particular areas where the water is within 4 feet from bank. I'll be fishing for larger fish, and my longest net extends about 6 feet. Anything more than that and I wont be able to net the fish. Any info or answers are very appreciated.
it is true,but a 4' net may be a little short .
 

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Honestly I have never been there. friend of mine told me there are two larger piers and one smaller rectangular one in the middle. He also said you can basically drive your car onto any one of these and drive all the way to the end if you like. Basically I have two questions. First, is this in fact true? Second, is there any particular areas where the water is within 4 feet from bank. I'll be fishing for larger fish, and my longest net extends about 6 feet. Anything more than that and I wont be able to net the fish. Any info or answers are very appreciated.
Depending on which pier you fish, a 6’ net would be too short for sure. If I was intending to catch fish over 2’ long, I would want at least a 10’ net. The first pier that you come to you might get by with a 6 footer
 

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I would say it is between 10 foot to 14 foot from your feet on the pier to maybe 14 foot down to the water. I've never measured it, but it's a good ways down to the water, you would need some type of extention on a net just to get it down to the water. The only pier that would aproach the fourteen foot would be the long steel pier that goes out to the fog horn and you need a boat to get to it
 

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They are putting lights on the steel wall right now because the water is so high and so little of the wall is sticking out, there have been 2 fatal crashes in a little more than a year because the visibility of the wall is so bad. None of those areas are any more than 6' above the surface of the water.

Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk
 

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you can drive all the way to the end of slips, try the river side at hot waters, or the opposite side , you can fish out the back of your car lol but you will have to add about 8 ft to your net.. and dont let go of your rods . now we f put water in a 5 gal bucket and set the reel inside bucket and rods hangs down..i have had a coupl rods jump off the ground into the water couple years ago my buddy caught a burbot there, and a musky, and a crap load of trout

ps if your athletic and have kahunas you can travel off the mile long pier and walk among the tall grass going east up onto those big rocks and get within a couple feet of water as long as the wind is right, but dont fall down in those giant boulders or you may disseapear lol... used to get alot of fish over there, also the east side of the bay from the big parkin lot you can get close to the water alot of white bass over there
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, anyone know where I can get a good 12 foot landing net preferably with a knotless rubber net? Not a must on the net o can always replace
 

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Here ya go guys,,, the best/ most info I could find; (if this is what your referring to?)

( I OFTEN PRAY, that someone would think of doing this, AT ONE OF THE PINNEY DOCKS, OR ALONG THE RIVER, IN BULA!!! Concrete barriers are VERY EASY TO OBTAIN,,,,, & I even have a friend who owns a Rail Road,,,,, for CHEAP transportation.
Just another one of my DREAMS. ;>)



back on topic;
http://outdoorswithfrischkorn.blogspot.com/2017/10/lake-metroparks-new-lake-erie-fishing.html

Lake Metroparks' new Lake Erie fishing pier hooking lots of interest
And because the rather longish Grand River west breakwater at the mouth of the stream is about two miles to the west, sand migration is essentially halted. That means the lake’s ground floor extending out from the park and its pier are an amalgam of stone, rock and boulders with little in the way or either sand or mud.

“Perfect fish habitat,” Palagyi said.

Of important note is that the pier’s deck does ride about 10 feet above the lake’s surface. Add another three feet for the wrap-around steel tube railing and it’s a bit of a drop to retrieve a caught fish.

No problem as anglers found solutions even before the park’s official dedication October 17th.



Some anglers have discovered the so-called “pier nets” popularized by fishers working the Atlantic Ocean’s string of fishing piers. Without going into too much detail, such a device consists of large-diameter landing net material stretched over a metal hoop and suspended by three chains that are attached to a small ring and from which is tied a lengthy piece of rope.



Drop the affair over the pier’s side and let it sink a ways, slide a caught fish over the enveloping net and raise the whole shebang.



The alternative is that some anglers are using home-brewed handle extensions of either PVC piping or aluminum and figuring how best to incorporate a way to take down the unit into a truck-manageable length.
 

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Here ya go guys,,, the best/ most info I could find; (if this is what your referring to?)

Some anglers have discovered the so-called “pier nets” popularized by fishers working the Atlantic Ocean’s string of fishing piers. Without going into too much detail, such a device consists of large-diameter landing net material stretched over a metal hoop and suspended by three chains that are attached to a small ring and from which is tied a lengthy piece of rope.

Drop the affair over the pier’s side and let it sink a ways, slide a caught fish over the enveloping net and raise the whole shebang.

The alternative is that some anglers are using home-brewed handle extensions of either PVC piping or aluminum and figuring how best to incorporate a way to take down the unit into a truck-manageable length.
I've seen what is probably a Lake Erie version of that set-up ... this guy had a milk crate with a rope attached to both sides, left it in the water tied off on the rail and when he caught something it was ready to go ... pull the fish over it and lift them up, it worked pretty good ... unless you got a giant sheephead :p most anything you catch will fit in there and the sides are tall enough so they can't flop around and get out ... and the hooks don't get tangled :D

for that PVC, I'd use at least Schedule 40 pipe, you could glue on threaded fittings, male on one end, female on the other, and make the extensions any length you want
 

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I have netted some HUGE fish on the Jax Beach pier with one of the bridge nets, they are extremely effective. Keep in mind that we would often be using them in large open ocean swells and up against pilings covered with barnacles and oysters, which are basically razors as far as fishing line is concerned, and they were still able to get the job done.
 

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I have walked out on the Mile Long pier many times in the evening just relaxing and enjoying the views. Often wondered about how to get out on the other side of the river from the bank. Going to have to take a look at bank fishing from the Hot Waters side, especially if you can drive all the way out.

When I lived in Alabama used to fish Tennessee River tailwaters below the Lake Guntersville dam. There was a big wall right below the dam you could fish from and catch stripers, flatheads, blues, drum. Great place to pull sabiki rigs across and catch 2 sometimes 3 skipjack on one cast.

Anywho, those bridge nets and similar designs were the bomb for those who had them, most would share if another fisherman got something big. The other option was to walk it down the wall about 100' until you got down to the big rocks and could get to the water.
 

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hot waters is more of a parking lot than a pier, i know they call it a pier but it' basically a parking lot for the launch ramp. parking in the middle, ramps on one side, warm water discharge on the other.
 

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I checked this place out, at least at the time I was there, a bridge net would not have been needed, just a long handled regular net.
 
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