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Gut Hook Help!!

Discussion in 'Tackle Talk' started by OSU_Fisherman, Jun 23, 2007.

  1. OSU_Fisherman

    OSU_Fisherman Bassin' Buckeye

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    Alright guys, I dont know if this is in the right forum, but it'll at least get out there.

    I took a buddy out on the jon boat for the first time the other day and we were getting into a good number of bass. He was fishing a plastic worm that was Texas-rigged off of the bottom just like I was. Only difference is that he was letting the fish take them quite a bit longer than I was. This led to one decent bass (20" 2.5lber) to get the hook in the throat real good.

    I flatten my barbs on ALL of my EWG Worm hooks to assist in just this type of thing. I look over and my buddy just cuts the line and lets the fish back into the water!!:confused: I immediately questioned his thinking. He said that his dad told him that fish are so acidic that they will rust the hook out in 2 days and poop out the worm and be totally fine.

    If this is the case, I think that this would be a much better idea than messing around with the hook and making them bleed even more. I hope somebody on here can help me believe this.

    Thanks,
    Jason
     
  2. streamstalker

    streamstalker deleted

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    I've heard the same thing and I once caught quite a large bass that was in the process of excreting about six inches of fishing line--I assume there was a partially digested hook somewhere still up there. Anyway, he was feeling good enough to inhale my worm.

    How long it takes might depend on the hook. I don't think a nickel-plated Owner hook is going to go away that fast. I have found that if they are hooked in the top of the gullet that I can remove the plastic; cut the line; and then, grab the hook with your forceps and push (rather than pull) the hook with the bend facing toward the gill area. You can safely drop the hook through without even touching the gills. I have used this method several times and seen the fish happily swim away.

    Gut hooking just happens sometimes, but tell your buddy to set the damn hook! I don't know how experienced your buddy is but I used to do the same thing and gut hooked the fish more often. Now I usually perform this surgery for my brother! I would say that if you are going to give them the hook it would be very important to make sure you remove the worm first so they don't get their digestive tract clogged....as my experience showed, they'll still eat with just that hook in there.
     

  3. heyjay

    heyjay Where's the fish ?

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    Here are a couple of links to some information . The first is an in-fisherman article with step by step pictures . I think this is the best way I've found .

    The next is an article by Ralph Mann . It shows results of tests done with the hooks being left in the throat . Very interesting stuff .

    Based on his research , John Foster, Recreational Fisheries Coordinator for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources recommended anglers carefully remove even deeply imbedded hooks. If the hook can not be removed, then it seems better to leave about 18 inches of line attached.

    http://www.in-fisherman.com/magazine/articles/if2806_HookRemoval/

    http://www.bassdozer.com/articles/manns/hook_in_out.shtml
     
  4. OSU_Fisherman

    OSU_Fisherman Bassin' Buckeye

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    HeyJay, thanks for the sites. They were very informative and I will definitely be using that technique next time I hook a fish in the gullet like that.

    Anyway, I'm still looking for a little more confirmation to prove my friend wrong. We were out yesterday and he hooked a Rock Bass with all 3 hooks on a Bass Stopper and ended up just cutting it off. I almost said something again, but I would like to be more positive about the speed of this hook erosion.

    Thanks guys,
    Jason
     
  5. I can't help you with the time involved in rusting out the hook but I can attest to the success of the hook removal method that Heyjay posted. I have used that method for 30 years and have done so in ponds that I have fished frequently as well and don't recall ever seeing one end up dead. It may have happened somewhere along the way but I imagine that leaving the hook in would have resulted in more fatalities.

    Perhaps if you show your buddy how to do the removal process he may choose to do that rather than donating all of his hooks as well.;)