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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(Anyone else notice their electric bill is going up incrementally every month for the past few?) Anyone using G-T equipment? Any comments-cost to install them, cost to operate(Summer/Winter)? General impressions appreciated.
 

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I work with a few guys that have them. Intial cost is pretty good, so ROI is quite a few years. If you plan on moving don't even consider it. If you plan on being buried in your home, definitely look into it.
 

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I know a guy who had one installed in his house it worked great in the summer but in the winter he was running a $1000 dollar a month electric bill because the installer didn't size the system right ended up having to drill a few more wells. Just something to look out for.apparently they cool more efficently than they heat
 

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If sized correctly they will heat your home just fine! Some, especially older units, are sized for cooling. Now they have 2 stage units so they can be sized for heating to heat house to a lower outside temp b/4 back-up kicks in & let 1st stage cool house. Back up is usually electric strip heaters, the most expensive to operate form of heat. Big bucks to buy, can be real cheap to run. I talked to a lady with a 4,000 sq. ft. house who told me her electric bills never went over $150.00 a month for an all electric house. $12,000.00-$20,000.00 to have one installed.

P.S. I sell for a HVAC company & deal with them. If you live in central Ohio, I will gladly come out & give you a quote.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a one acre pond behind my house that is 5 1/2 to 6 ft. deep. I've heard you can put the lines on the bottom of a pond and effect the required heat exchange but not familiar with this setup. Should(could) be cheaper than well drilling-had a new water well done last year($6K for on hole!)Anyone?
 

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I have a one acre pond behind my house that is 5 1/2 to 6 ft. deep. I've heard you can put the lines on the bottom of a pond and effect the required heat exchange but not familiar with this setup. Should(could) be cheaper than well drilling-had a new water well done last year($6K for on hole!)Anyone?
We had a guy that works for a geothermal installer come to our camp and discuss the possibilities. IIRC, he said the best pond depth for optimum heat exchanging is 15 ft., and it can't be a small pond. 12 ft. is the minimum if there is enough bottom at that depth. In some cases, cooling towers can be used instead of wells or lakes. Also, if you have enough real estate to dedicate to it, a near-surface system may work.

Side note: we decided not to go with it because the projected "pays for itself" date was so far beyond the equipment warranties that it wasn't economically feasible for us, all things considered. Of course, it would have been a retrofit job, which adds to the expense, and also on a pretty big scale. We were looking at a single building that has nearly 3 dozen 120K BTU furnaces, and campus-wide, we use 50,000+ gallons of propane per year, about 75% for heat. As a new install, perhaps it would have worked out. For home heating though, it can be a much more positive story.

If you are seriously interested in pursuing it, have Fisherball come out and discuss it, or PM me and I will send you contact info for the company that we talked with.
 

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Instead of the high cost of geo, have you guys looked into the high efficient heat pumps on the market?
think you would be amazed at there efficiencys.
geo's not only are extremely high cost of initial install, but if they fail, huge money to fix due to the lack of companys who are certified installers.

do some reaserch!
good luck, bill
 
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