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I'm looking to get into tying some flies and i'm looking for suggestions on a vise. I'm not trying to spend $250 in case I can't take to it. Also would like to see if anyone has one for sale.
 

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Some people will disagree with this advice, but I say start with one that's relatively inexpensive (or borrowed) in case you don't stick with it, as you said. The problem, of course, is that cheap ones don't hold hooks as well and that gets frustrating.

I have an old Thompson Model A you could borrow if you'd like.

If you buy, the one I have and like that's pretty affordable is the Dyna-King Kingfisher (about $120 I think??).

Lots of options out there for less than $250!
 

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I dont know how good the vise is but I am going to by the bass pro fly tying kit that comes with everything you need to get started. I think it's around 80.00 but I am in the same boat as you I dont want to invest alot of money in something if I dont like it. That way if I don like it I can always get a better vice down the road.
 

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The vises that come with kits are normally horrible. Avoid them like the plague.

Personally I like Regals. I bought one used years ago on Ebay and its still going strong. I have tied everysize from a 22 to a 1/0 hook on her.

Nothing to adjust , spring loaded , open jaws, close jaws hook stays put. I like the rotary as it simplifies tying hackle and chenille and such.
 

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I would pick up an cheeper one first and then if you think you will stick with it look into picking up a nice rotary vice.

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I saw this thread while at lunch & was going to post that same review. My 1st vise was a Danvise. I no longer have it for 2 reasons...1) I fell into a new Renzetti Traveler for $75.00 (it was used once!) & 2) a cancer stricken friend of mine had become unsteady with his hands but could still tie on the Danvise, so I gave it to him. The Danvise may be the best "bang for the buck" available.
Bottom line is that there are a number of very serviceable & inexpensive vises available.
Mike
 

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My first vise was a DanVise New Classic. It's still made and is a great vise for under $100. I think it's about $80 or so. I upgraded last year to an HMH Spartan and love it. With the Spartan and the extra midge jaws I bought, I have about $230 in it. I like the adjustable jaw angle with the HMH, hook holding power, simple design, and it's built to last a lifetime. With the midge jaws I have gone down to size 28 hooks, on the standard jaws I have gone down to 18 and as high as 6/0 (not rated for hooks that big, but it worked).
 

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There are many choices for vises in the "under $50" category. I advise you to start with one of those. Then later on upgrade. I started with an AAA Economy Vise (probably one of the cheapest vises available, you'll find it for anywhere between $10 and $20) and then upgraded to a Renzetti Aprentice (this is somewhere right under $100).
I would advise against a fly fishing kit. For the manufacturer that is the highest margin item as they fill it with crap. Just start with (for example) what you need for woolly buggers (hooks, marabou, chenille, hackle, etc) and let's say eggs (some McFly foam) - just go for the basic colors (white, black, olive, maroon and a clown package for eggs). Get some cheap tools for beginning (maybe in a set), you'll upgrade later. You'll find a lot of tools and materials locally or online.
Unfortunately the passion of fly tying comes with the "need" to have them all (types, sizes, colors, you name it) and you will be buying all kind of materials and tools. It never ends. This is why I advise you to start with basic and then later on get something that you will like based on your previous experience. I sell some of the above mentioned here: almflyfish.com
Happy tying!
 

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Can't say enough nice things about that Crown/Regal knockoff. It was my first vice around 12 years ago and still works well. I use it as a dedicated hook holder for sharpening. My go-to vise now is the Anvil Apex. Not as smooth as a HMH but the price is right. Much love for the other vises mentioned but I've tied hundreds of flies on the Apex and it's still truckin'. Great for for everything from 4/0 Clousers to #20 dries. The best part is its made less than 100 mi. From Cinci, in Columbus Indiana.
-Jim


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There are a ton of great recommendations everyone has given. I have personally moved up the vice food chain as the years of tying have gotten more varied. I just have one piece of advice for you OP.
Make sure to get a Rotary Vice!
Anything else will piss you off when your fly tying skills improve with time.
As far as the machined, $250 beauty..lets just say it's the LAST vice you'll ever buy and plan on handing it down then you've taken your last breath, lol.
 

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Excellent reviews here:

http://flyfishohio.com/Vise Review 1/Fly_Tying_Vise_Shoot-Out.htm

I think you can't go wrong with the Crown/Regal knockoff from BPS or the Danvise as a starter vise. I would strongly advise against spending over $100 on your first vise as many people end up just not sticking with it.

Both the Crown/Regal and Danvise are perfectly functional. The Danvise is true rotary for those that argue you should start with rotary. My first vise was a Griffin 1A, however after using a lever clamp mechanism I really hate dealing with screw clamps now.

I have been a piss poor fly tyer for about 15 years now. Last year I finally upgraded to a Peak Vise and I love it; but it is only slightly more convenient than the old Griffin.

-Matt-
 

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There are a ton of great recommendations everyone has given. I have personally moved up the vice food chain as the years of tying have gotten more varied. I just have one piece of advice for you OP.
Make sure to get a Rotary Vice!
Anything else will piss you off when your fly tying skills improve with time.
As far as the machined, $250 beauty..lets just say it's the LAST vice you'll ever buy and plan on handing it down then you've taken your last breath, lol.
Just to add one more thing, it tends to come up a lot when the HMH name is dropped that "Oh, it's not a rotary vise!" 1) this is true except when the head angle is set horizontal, which is perfect (in my opinion) for streamer tying. And 2) at least for me, the only time I have ever wanted rotary action in a vise was when tying streamers. It makes it simple and quick to wrap body material on a larger streamer like x-cut rabbit or anything in a long dubbing loop. On small hooks and dry flies, I almost never use a rotary function, but different strokes for different folks, I guess. I keep the head angle horizontal for all streamers because I get a ton of room to work on both sides of the hook, usually at a steeper angle for small nymphs and dries.
 
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