Fishing spawn sacks??

Discussion in 'Steelhead Talk' started by midoh39, Nov 5, 2008.

  1. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    I have a question eversince I think Ill be up in the Cleveland area around Thanksgiving if the Football team doesnt make state finals. Well heres my question while fishing sacs do you use a float while fishing them. Also any advice where I can order some steelhead tackle( floats, jigs ect) online. Anything will help
     
  2. I can send you the answers to all your questions if you send me twenty bucks.
     

  3. I dont know where your located but you can try Rodmakers Shop or Erie Outfitter. www.pulsejigs.com has nice jigs for good prices.
     
  4. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    Im located north of Dayton so I would buy the stuff online, and pick up bait that morning. Heres another question what brand and size of floats do you recomend? Once again thanks
     
  5. MuskieJim

    MuskieJim Trophy Tamer

    I prefer vertical style floats (Drennan Crystal Avon, Raven) because they allow you to see everything that your bait is doing. The blackbird or sheffield style floats are good too and really easy to see. I use sheffields when the current is ripping and I really need to splitshot my leader. The whole key to fishing sacs is to keep the bait down in the water column near the bottom. If you can slow it down a hair by drifting the line straight from your rod tip to the float, you are in good shape. That's why pins are so deadly.
     
  6. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    Thanks for the help you guys but what does the grams thing for the floats mean? Im still not sure about this trip since we won again last night but I'll find out next week if Im going or not.
     
  7. The grams rating of a float indicates how much weight/split shots is needed below the float to properly load/balance the float. Specialized split shots can come in sizes as small as 0.07g. In the big box stores that generally only carry the Water Gremlin brand shots, you will usually only find shots as small as size BB (about 0.6g) or sometimes as small as B (about 0.3g). So to load a 6g rated float using Water Gremlin BB shots, you would want to space out 10 split shots on your line beneath the float. Stay away from the removable split shots with the little wings/ears as these will cause your bait to spin around in the current and twist your line, instead use perfectly round shot. I use an assortment of shots ranging from 0.6g down to 0.1g. I attach larger shots closer to the float to help balance it and then progressively smaller shots further down the line/leader.

    Split Shot Size Conversion http://www.questoutdoors.net/gear/articles/shot-size-conversion/

    How to rig a float http://www.anglersinternational.com/accessories.html

    These Raven floats are my favorite http://www.raventackle.com/floats.htm and I use an assortment of SS, SM, FM, and FD floats ranging in size from 3g up to 11g. Most of the time I find myself using either the RVFSM3 4.8g or the RVFFM1 4.2g floats. When a float is properly loaded it should be submerged up to the white line on these Raven floats. To use these floats you have to purchase the silicone tubing separately. I also like some of the Blackbird floats http://www.redwingtackle.com/, I sometimes use the Blackbird Phantoms or the Balsa BWF's. I personally don't care for Drennans although they track great are extremely sensitive they are too hard to see from any distance and I prefert floats with an antenna. The Sheffield floats are cheap, but they don't track as well and aren't as sensitive as the other floats I mentioned. While at http://www.redwingtackle.com/ be sure to click on the 'Fishing Tips' link.

    You can make float fishing for steelhead as specialized or as simple as you like. The more specialized floats mentioned above when used properly can help you to present baits in a more natural way in currents, but can be a little more complicated for a first time steelheader to master. Many people also use the weighted styrofoam floats with a few split shots just to get the bait down. These floats are easier to see, they are dirt cheap, can be casted farther than smaller plastic or balsa floats, and you don't have to fumble around with balancing them with specific amounts of shot. However, they are not as sensitive, not as stealthy, and do not track as well.

    [​IMG]
    Illustration of the stealthy bait forward presentation that can be achieved with specialized float fishing techniques.

    [​IMG]
    Illustration of less specialized float fishing presentation in which bait ends up being dragged behind the float and other terminal tackle. Fish can certainly still be caught this way but at times they may be spooked by seeing your line and split shots before the bait.

    I realize I'm throwing a lot of info at you, I hope it helps more than it confuses you. :p

    John
     
  8. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    Thanks jojopro that was very nice of you to share that info. I just ordered some raven floats some FM and SM, with some mini foo jigs and some salmon egg hooks. Now all that I need is some line, and weights, and I got that covered. So thanks all for your help
     
  9. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    CAn any one give some public access points on the Grand or Chagrin rivers, and a bait shop that sells sacks and maggots?/ THis info would really help
     
  10. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    I just wanted to say thanks to all for your help. Me and my dad will be up there this Saturday. Our plan is to leave Dayton Saturday morning head up to the grand grab some bait and start. And football is still gong on!
     
  11. Very usefull info here from the ODNR on steelhead fishing.
    http://www.ohiodnr.com/Home/Fishing...hingfairportsteelhead/tabid/6166/Default.aspx Plus they have access maps for several of the main OH steelhead streams.

    Good to hear that you will be able to make a trip up, and you're coming at a good time. All the OH steelhead streams just got hammered with rain which means that a whole bunch more steelies are moving up into all the streams as we speak. Right now nearly all the streams are too high, fast, and muddy to have good fishing success but when they do settle down we will likely be experiencing the best steelhead fishing conditions so far this season. Considering that the Grand spiked way up, and that it is very slow to settle down and clear, the Grand may not fish very well by next weekend. The Chagrin or the Rocky on the other hand are two of the fastest clearing rivers and will likely be in much better shape by the weekend. Keep an eye on the flow gauges http://waterdata.usgs.gov/oh/nwis/rt and check back here for reports.

    John
     
  12. midoh39

    midoh39 member

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    Is there a baitshop around the Chagrin? And Ive been to the rocky twice and only caught 1 but the water was really low, and It doesnt seem that theres a bait shop that isnt creepy around it.
     
  13. Go into fairport harbor to grand river bait and tackel. It's kinda a middle point for the lake and ashtabula county rivers and streams.
     
  14. All this talk about using floats, and no one suggested using just a bottom bouncing technique. I was just introduced to this technique about a week and a half ago. I don't think I will ever use a float again, maybe in some stagnet water, but that's about it. But as far as a moving river, never again.

    It's very simple, just tie up a normal steelie leader with a small swivel. I use a 4lb leader about 20"-24" of it. Leading line I use 10lb p-line. Make sure both sets of line are flouro. Then put enough wieght above the swivel to keep your bait on the bottom and bounce it with the river flow. Then use a colored steelie hook to match the sac your fishing. I also fish a sac that has floats in it to keep it off the bottom.

    Works wonders, I personally love this method. You can really feel the fish better when it hits.
     
  15. One question I have -

    What is the difference in the amounts of split shot needed if you are fishing a jig at the bottom vs. spawn vs. minnows vs. etc.
     
  16. Since a jig is allready weighted, less split shot weight on the line is required to keep the offering down in the strikezone. The larger/heavier the jig head, the less split shot required. Eggs naturally sink, and a very large spawn sack requires less added weight than a smaller one. Most other baits or soft plastics are lighter or more buoyant and would thus need more weight to keep them down in the strike zone. The exact amount of split shot needed depends also on the depth and current speed of the water you are fishing and the size/type of float you are using. When in doubt, start light and work your way up as needed, (its a lot easier to add more shot than it is to remove it!). You should have enough shot on your line to get your float properly loaded anyways, and if your float is fully loaded and yet you still aren't staying down near the bottom you need to switch to a larger float.

    John