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Hey guys,

I'm new here. Been reading for awhile. Figured I would finally post something. I thought both of these were saugeyes but I can't convince myself 100% they are. Need some expert advice. Thanks!! First one was 19 inches. The second one was 24 inches, fish ohio. I love the coloration on the second one.
 

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Hard to tell from the camera angle and lighting but both appear to be walleye, due to the whitish spot on the bottom of the tail fin. Most (but not ALL saugeye) do not have that tell tail marking, pardon the pun...nice fish!
 

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The markings would make me say saugeye, without a doubt. Most saugeyes I catch have white tipped tails, though not as prominent as a walleye.
 

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Both are definitely Saugeyes. Walleyes will not have the black "blotting" on its side, nor will they have black dots on its dorsal fins.

Saugeyes will have a white tip on the tail fin, but it goes along the full length of the tail, not just the corner like a Walleye.

Nice catches.


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Oh c'mon guys its' a cinch to tell from the pictures those fish right there are called suppas:d Nice catch!
 

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Yup, Saugeyes, Beautiful ones at that. Love when they get that golden hue going on from basking in the Sun in the shallower streams/lakes.
 

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I'd have to taste them to know for sure. Let me know when & where. :)
 

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One thing I've noticed is that I can always tell the saugs apart by their color. Sauger have more of a brown tint and walleye are green. Every sauger I've ever caught has been brown to almost black in places and all the saugeye have had an obvious green walleye tint. There are other giveaways (sauger have spots on dorsal fin for example) but the color always strikes me as the most obvious way to tell. I'm sure there are instances where this may not be true. Going to Maumee for the walleye run really helped me to see a lot of walleye since there aren't many around here. Sauger and walleye are much different looking fish. If you see walleye traits in the fish, it's a saugeye.
 

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Lots of terminology variation with the saugfishes, but I think GarrettMyers has it right. SaugER have that golden color and the black markings. SaugEYE shade into green and their saddle markings aren't as distinct, and walleye are a whole 'nother animal. Those look like saugers to me, and nice ones, although I'm less sure about the first one. I almost always catch sauger in the LMR, and it wasn't until I caught a for-sure saugeye that the difference became more clear.
 

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A couple Saugers for reference. Distinct black markings on dorsal , mostly in line. Saugeyes have them but are scattered and not so prominent. The Saugers have the black saddle patterns and the color can vary. Notice the Sauger that ate the superfluke half his size, not much color. Fourth one is a Walleye
 

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Lots of terminology variation with the saugfishes, but I think GarrettMyers has it right. SaugER have that golden color and the black markings. SaugEYE shade into green and their saddle markings aren't as distinct, and walleye are a whole 'nother animal. Those look like saugers to me, and nice ones, although I'm less sure about the first one. I almost always catch sauger in the LMR, and it wasn't until I caught a for-sure saugeye that the difference became more clear.

It’s not really a terminology variation, it’s three different fish. Color isn’t a good indicator, as that can really vary depending on the water and the individual fish. The markings, and to some degree the shape, are the only ways to identify.
 

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It’s not really a terminology variation, it’s three different fish. Color isn’t a good indicator, as that can really vary depending on the water and the individual fish. The markings, and to some degree the shape, are the only ways to identify.
Lots of people are calling saugers "saugeyes" is all I meant. I think there's a local word usage thing going on around here when there's no need to be too precise about it. They're three separate animals. And yeah, color can vary from stream to stream. You need to look at overall shape, pattern of black spots on the dorsal fin, amount of white on the tail fin, and color can figure into it as well. I've only ever fished the LMR around here for 30+ years, and all the saugers are pretty uniform gold and black. I've caught many hundreds. In all that time I have caught exactly one walleye and one saugeye, and they have a very different look about them. The middle LMR at least is teeming with saugers. The other two are there also, but they're unusual.
 

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I have experienced the same thing where I usually fish the river (lower). Saugeye look so much different than sauger it's pretty obvious. Even though saugeye are supposed to be sterile, I have read some studies to find that not to be true. When it's not a true 50/50 saugeye, I think that's when they get really tough to distinguish.
 
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