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Well I went flyfishing for the first time in the Smoky Mountains. All I can say is :S . Casting was harder with trees around then when I practiced in the backyard. We also went to spots were the kids could go and also where other people keeped coming up from behind me and I was afraid of getting someone with a hook.
The waters were very clear. So mabe next time I will have better luck.

Chris
 

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I know what you mean about having too many people around, most times I worry about hooking myself - it would be twice as bad to hook someone else. I have not tried the fly for trout yet, but I did catch some bluegills last year on a sinking fly that looked like a small roach. Give the gills a try, because it will up your confidence. I can't wait to try the fly rod on other species this year.

BlueWater
 

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I wouldnt sweat getting skunked in the GSMNP, its as tough a place to catch fish as any. Heavily pressured, tough casting, technical seams and extremely weary small fish. Just remember the park itself is not stocked so you are dealing with wild (browns and bows) and some native ( brookies) trout that are as smart as any fish around, add the fact that there are always japanese tourist stopping by the busloads to take your picture and it just adds to the commotion. Lets see, wading is always a tough one down there as well and being stealthy while stumbling, is always a hard thing. Dont beat yourself up to bad over this and use it as a learning tool. Like previously posted, hit the bluegills in a pond and your confidence will return in big amounts, River fishing is as hard to do well as anything with the flyrod and it can take many years to be proficient with your casting to keep out of the trees. Heck Ive been throwing the long rod for over 20 years and often get flies stuck int he trees, only difference is I usually throw 2 flies at a time and when you snag them half as often, you loose just as many...;)

Salmonid
 

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Dont beat yourself up to bad over this and use it as a learning tool. Like previously posted, hit the bluegills in a pond and your confidence will return in big amounts, River fishing is as hard to do well as anything with the flyrod and it can take many years to be proficient with your casting to keep out of the trees. Heck Ive been throwing the long rod for over 20 years and often get flies stuck int he trees, only difference is I usually throw 2 flies at a time and when you snag them half as often, you loose just as many...;)

Salmonid
AMEN BROTHER!

i caught gills bass and crappies for 8 years before i even went trout fishing---you shouldnt even have to think about casting---it should be instinctive---look and cast there---but it doesnt come overnight or by reading a book or taking a class---we all sacrifice flies to the trees---thats why a lot of us tie flies---we cant afford it otherwise!---if you dont lose flies to snags logs and roots then you arent fishing where the trout live---ive been at it 47 years and still learning---hang in there and enjoy the ride
 

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Roll Cast, Roll Cast, Roll Cast....

I am a fairly new caster and finally buckled down last fall and can now throw a 30-35 ft roll cast with no real difficulty.

Also I use the line positioning, slowly raising the rod tip, as a slow retrieve for weighted flys...this slow, slow retrieve has brought many crappie that would have been missed otherwise.

Cast sink, start slowly raising tip and getting line in place for next roll...bam!

Not the best position to do a hook set but may as well fish the fly if it is already in the water anyhow.

Using this technique with a small bugger you can fairly quicklky cover a small pond and at the very least find where the fish are located then slow down to "properly" fish that area.

You do have to be VERY careful in public water areas, too many kids love to watch people fish. I had one afternoon at Hoover where a mother kept telling her kids to go see what I was catching...I guess she didn't pick up on the fly traveling through the air. I would stop fishing when they cam e near, they would leave, start fishing, they would come back, stop fishing...she actually cussed me out out for not letting the kids watch!!!!
 

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I've been fly fishing for just under a year now. I fish quite frequently (every weekend and after work weather permitting). It took me up until the end of January to start catching fish consistently, or at all for that matter. Believe me, for as much as I fish, I took a lot of skunkings to the point where I would think anyone else would just give up the fly rod.

I stuck with it and now I'm reaping the rewards. I think what draws me more to it is the fact that you basically learn something new each time on the water.

Personally, I started out on trout simply because of where I live and the endless opportunities to target them. It's actually still the only species I've targeted.

I would say that I 90% roll cast. I can back and forward cast just fine, it's just that I prefer roll casting and actually find it more effective. Most of the water I fish isn't that wide so you almost have to anyway. It's also not hard to shoot line out for longer casts while roll casting either once you get used to the concept itself.

But to really get to the point here, the most important thing to learn is mending line. I am certainly no expert or seasoned veteran, but I can tell you right now that the time I started to learn and apply this concept was the same time I started catching fish. Casting is an important thing to learn obviously, but mending line is just as important and will prove to be more important once you get comfortable with the rod itself. In my opinion it's the biggest difference in catching fish or getting skunked.

What brhoff suggested is perfectly fine and most effective for fishing wets or streamers, but it's a whole different ballgame when nymphing or fishing dries and that's where mending line is critical.
 

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is what they say about flycasting. I think it was Earl Stanley that said, "It takes 20 years to become a BAD banjo player." I think it's the same for FFing. My brother-in-law and his son fished for 2 years before catching their first Steelhead. Definitely try lake/pond fishing, it is much easier than always looking over your shoulder before each cast. I had a terrible time at the Mad when I first tried it, and almost never went back. After a year of practice and fishing in easier water, I did return and got a 16" Brown.

I hope the fishing in and around GSMNP than it sounds, I'm planning on retiring to Asheville!
 

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I'm going to the Smokies in about a month (hopefully before the big inner-tube hatch) and that was not a very encouraging report. I never expected it to be easy, but you make it sound even harder to catch trout there. I hope to go into the higher elevations where the brookies are. I'm told that they will go after just about anything if the presentation is right. I also hope to avoid bears. I've always felt that there is nothing that can mess up a fishing trip quite like being mauled by a bear. Ruins you whole day.

teeray
 

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I've never been to GSMNP proper. But it is suposed to be pretty tough, lots of fishing pressure, and tight streams with lots of trees and difficult casting. Probably a lot like the mad north of West Liberty :)

Here is a thing I saw today on a wind storm that went through there this weekend, probably the same winds we had here...

http://troutunderground.com/2007/04/17/windstorm-in-gsmnp-new-trout-habitat/
 
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