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Emerald Ash Borer Cuyahoga County

Discussion in 'Northeast Ohio Fishing Reports' started by Lewzer, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. Lewzer

    Lewzer Powderfinger

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    I got to work this morning and noticed the parking lots were very bare.
    Our company cut down 60+ ash trees over the weekend:mad: .
    These were gorgeous trees, the first to turn yellow in the fall. They had already lost most of their leaves.
    Got an email that they were all infested with the emerald ash borer. Our facility borders the Cuyahoga Valley National Park.
    Doesn't look good for the Park or for Ohio ash trees.
     
  2. It has been detected in Licking county the bordering county to the south of me so it probably won't be long for us as well. I think we all pretty much knew this day was coming, just a matter of how soon.

    I know if I had a stand of them I would be harvesting them to get something from them. Unfortunately the timber value for them is extremely low right now because everyone is doing that exact thing.:(
     

  3. Erterbass

    Erterbass Ohio Angler

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    What a sad thing to see Lewzer. Amazing what such a little creature can do to literally millions of trees.

    Does the ash borer have any natural predators? :confused:

    Bob
     
  4. Beer:30

    Beer:30 ReelAddiction ch.68

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    Erterbass, NO. That is why it is so devasting. It will do to the Ash tree what Dutch Elm Disease did to the Elm. There are a couple of products on the market, that some of my customers are using to help deter the pest. The problem is these are only street tree and none of the 80% of Ohio's woods. As these die off naturally, other species will fill in the canopy. There are other insects, European Crane Fly that are moving our way that are going to be a bigger problem.
     
  5. Erterbass

    Erterbass Ohio Angler

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    That is sad. I love trees and what they bring to us - shelter, shade, wildlife sanctuary, raw materials, etc. More trees in my neighborhood would be a great thing - kinda skimpy right now. (we live in a former farmfield before it was sold to a developer.)

    What impact will the ECF have and why will it be a bigger problem?

    Bob
     
  6. Lewzer

    Lewzer Powderfinger

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    Want to know what's really sad Erterbass? Go to Clingman's Dome in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. It brought tears to my eyes like the indian in the littering commercial.
    I used to go the the Smokies every springbreak camping while everyone else went to Florida. It's one of my favorite places in North America.

    My wife and I went there for vacation in 2003. They had (have) some kind of pine bark beetle and the mountains are bald with dead pines. All over the place. It's terrible. It shocked the hell out of me as I hadn't been there since around 1990.
     
  7. Lewzer, that is terrible news. My parents are buried in Eastern Tenn. They were from nearby Cosby.
     
  8. The ECF destroys lawns. Right now it's pretty bad up in Washington and Oregon. The larva are about 2" long and have some really tough skin which won them the name leatherjackets. These larva can destroy a whole lawn in days by going underground and eating everything up.

    In spots where it's dead already, they tend to dig deeper and are harder to find. This is because they love moisture so actually at night, sometimes you'll find them on top of the grass on a warm damp night.

    In their adult stage, they look like big mosquitoes. They come out in late August to early September, mate and lay their eggs all in a short time (24 hours). When those eggs hatch in late fall, the larva begin to eat away at turf grass. They somehow make it through the winter and continue feeding through Spring.

    Our neighbors daughter moved out to Oregon and struggled with these things. Two of the chemicals known for killing them are being banned so they had to use something called Delta-Eight in the Spring. They are a pretty nasty insect.


    With the EAB, I spent the last 2 summers working on the grounds crew at BGSU. Many days I helped take down multiple ash trees. There's about 400-500 ash trees on campus total. A lot of spots are pretty bare now, especially where Design & Construction wanted continuity and rows of the same trees planted everywhere.
     
  9. Beer:30

    Beer:30 ReelAddiction ch.68

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    MetzBGSU, It is a darn shame all those trees had to be taken down. While in college I work for the City of Medina Forestry Department and we planted 1000's of Green & White Ash trees in tree lawns. That was common practice for City's at the time. They grow nice, have little leaf debri and need little corrective pruning. I am a chemical sales rep., and have really taken to this EAB issue. The biggest problem with "Joe Sixpack" is the mixed message that the tree needs to be removed. That is the last result! These trees can be treated with simple products that can be purchased at a garden center (or chemical rep.. had to throw that in).. Bayer Enviro Science makes a product for Grubs on your lawn, "Merit". The active ingredient is Imidachloprid. This product can be spread around the base of the tree, which will then be translocated up through the tree. This does not give the tree 100% coverage, but it will help to ward off the pest. Any insect, diseased, or dieing tree, is ALWAYS as secondary issue to something stressing out the tree in the beginning. Just a little Arboriculture lesson!
     
  10. Just wondering how many of the devastating pest that we now contend with are directly due to our trade policies. I mean, ships come into this country carrying goods and unwanted stow aways ( gobies, zebra mussles) and we end up with them. Our exports must pass stringent tests before they are allowed in foreign countries. Example, a friend of mine works in a plant that makes machinery and much of it is for export. Any pallets or wood that is used in shipping must be heat treated to kill any pests and then certified that it has been treated. The imports into this country have no such tests for toxins and psts . (Remember the lead based paint in the toys for our children and grandchildren from China?)

    I for one am getting tired of it but don't know what to do. Seems to me that the entire congress of this great nation needs to be replaced with what Thomas Jefferson wanted. Citizens who would leave their businesses and farms, serve a short period in congress and then go back home to their businesses and farms after doing their civic duty.

    Maybe I'm just getting old and cranky or have too much time to think.

    Comments welcome.
     
  11. Erterbass

    Erterbass Ohio Angler

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    I have family in Farragut, TN about an hour from Clingman's Dome. They also have a home at Norris Lake north of Knoxville. That pine beetle was devastating but the pines are coming back. I have been down there 3 times so far this year and it's looking better.

    According to a friend of my bro-in-law, a TDNR employee, the long term effects will be negligible since the pines grow back so quickly. But up until a couple of years ago entire mountains were nothing but dead pines. Ugly to say the least...

    Take a trip back down next spring. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

    The ash trees won't recover the same way though. They take much longer to grow (if they reseed at all) and will be replaced by faster-growing species leaving us "ash-less" I'm afraid.

    Nature ain't pretty all the time :(

    Bob
     
  12. In BG's situation, they didn't really have a plan for the EAB and by the time they wanted to do something about the it, it really was too late. The trees being taken down are pretty much dead from head to toe. The few who still have some growth lower on the tree might be able to make it, but it's almost better to replant a better variety on a campus I think.