Ohio Game Fishing banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Wishin' I was fishin'
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I tumble deeper down the steelhead rabbit hole, I feel I find more questions than answers. Today's quandary is eggs. I recently learned that spawn sacks can be the ticket, but eggs is a broad topic in steelheading. There's fresh eggs, fresh skein, cured eggs and skein, and just recently I discovered Fireballs which seem to be orbees soaked in egg juice. So I ask you, my fellow chrome addicts, what do you think performs best?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Fresh Skein!!! Just adjust your bait size to the water clarity/mood of the fish. Take off all your weight and use the weight of the bait to cast and let it drift naturally. 4-6 pound test and an itty bitty treble.
 

·
Wishin' I was fishin'
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I quit using eggs & skein years ago. Not worth the stink & mess.


Two words - cooked shrimp.
A piece the size of a spawn sac can work wonders.
I looked up the shrimp, seems pretty damn legit. I'm trying it. Thanks for the tip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Lol we've used "store eggs" as the code word for shrimp on the river LOL

However, I've been out-fished in some good pods of fish because I didn't have eggs. I wouldn't say one isn't better than the other, just personal preference. There will be arguments over which is better but it's all how you present it.
 

·
Konfused Kayaker
Joined
·
5,219 Posts
"Store eggs" - That's some funny stuff.

Yup, they' re pretty legit. Plus, if you get hungry . . .

Just like anything else, some days some things work better than others, but they've been pretty consistent
winners for me. I don't mention this often on the forums.

They first rule of shrimp club is, we don't talk about shrimp. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,313 Posts
fresh is always best, but... they stink and stain and... ya have to catch one first to get fresh... a jar of Fireballs don't take up much room and could be the ticket one day, especially on a #12 egg hook and minimum split shot needed to get it (as in 1) bouncin' on the bottom:sneaky:
 

·
Wishin' I was fishin'
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What does the borax do? Almost every brine or cure I see contains it, and also sugar. I keep reading that steelhead have a sweet tooth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
cured eggs for me is all ive used for a loooonnnngggggggg time now
its a personal preference some will say fresh , some will say cured, some say marshmellows ...its all in what you are comfortable with and know how to use..
for me its mostly about making my own and see how it works....over the years i have had some eggs ive cured that are real clunkers ...but over time ive come up with a cure that catches tons of fish and im happy with it ..i can adjust it as needed right on the river....for me its more about it being something ""I" came up with ...i make all my jigs almost all my spoons and all my spinners that i use for steelhead...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
What does the borax do? Almost every brine or cure I see contains it, and also sugar. I keep reading that steelhead have a sweet tooth.
the borax toughens the egg membrane and dries out the egg some ...a box of 20 mule team borax they sell by the laundry soap will last you a long time
but its all in how you take care of the eggs from the start...first thing is to bleed out the fish get all the blood out of it, this will give you a much cleaner egg cluster...from there i rinse mine off in non chlorinated water then cut the skein lengthwise to expose the eggs then sprinkle with my cure and let set overnight in a collander in a fridge or cold place...they will milk out some overnight..next day i cut them into useable size pieces and sprinkle them with a lil more cure and place them in freezer bags,, they will freeze good for a long time this way and you just take out a bag the night before and ready to go the next day
 

·
wolfenstein
Joined
·
413 Posts
Just read an article about cutting pieces of sponge into small "eggs". Dip in melted petroleum jelly mixed with some anise oil. Anyone try this? I'm thinking about trying this year, sounds simple and keeps indefinitely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Just read an article about cutting pieces of sponge into small "eggs". Dip in melted petroleum jelly mixed with some anise oil. Anyone try this? I'm thinking about trying this year, sounds simple and keeps indefinitely.
I think I read the same article in Salmon, Trout, Steelheader. Seemed pretty cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Borax is a desiccant and has antimicrobial properties. By keeping the egg surface dry the chance of nasties proliferating is reduced. Eggs coated in borax can go months in the fridge without going off. Uncured roe has about a one week shelf life.

Any natural egg that ends up in the biological drift of the river is going to be hard or water hardened. So eggs are naturally hard. When they come out of the fish, they lack much water which makes the eggs more dense than water so they sink rapidly to the bottom and get caught in the gravel. Eggs are hydrophilic and want water. When exposed to water they soak it in and swell making the shell more durable as would be needed in nature to afford the protection the egg needs to survive until hatching.

Hardening or not is personal preference. Rainbows have teeth and can readily pop any egg with ease no matter how water hardened. That said, pressured fish do seem to prefer softer eggs at times and will reject harder eggs. If you're fishing big water and making long retrieves and big casts, a little bit harder egg can be beneficial. Slow and deep winter water a softer egg is usually better.

Salmon eggs don't do well in the freezer unless hardened a little. Trout eggs seem to do fine frozen without being hardened any. My preference is trout scrape for float fishing. Water is the enemy, keep them as dry as possible until they go on a hook. They have a short shelf life though so if you're fishing frequent short sessions, it is nice to have eggs that will last in the fridge you can grab and go whenever. These get a slight harden and then coated in borax. Get a paint strainer and put the loose eggs in it from the fish. Dip in river water a couple times and then spin the bag in the air to get the water out. The eggs are in the water for less than a minute which makes a firm but not hard egg. Put the eggs in a bag and take home. Lay them out on paper towels and dry off. Put them in day sized portions in quart sized ziplocks. Shake them up to coat the eggs in borax. Seal up the bags and freeze. These are good for years in the freezer and will last in the fridge for up to two months. I have some that I am still working through in the freezer from 2008 that are mint😎. You need a non-self defrosting freezer. Frost free freezers will ruin frozen eggs over time.
 

·
Wishin' I was fishin'
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Borax is a desiccant and has antimicrobial properties. By keeping the egg surface dry the chance of nasties proliferating is reduced. Eggs coated in borax can go months in the fridge without going off. Uncured roe has about a one week shelf life.

Any natural egg that ends up in the biological drift of the river is going to be hard or water hardened. So eggs are naturally hard. When they come out of the fish, they lack much water which makes the eggs more dense than water so they sink rapidly to the bottom and get caught in the gravel. Eggs are hydrophilic and want water. When exposed to water they soak it in and swell making the shell more durable as would be needed in nature to afford the protection the egg needs to survive until hatching.

Hardening or not is personal preference. Rainbows have teeth and can readily pop any egg with ease no matter how water hardened. That said, pressured fish do seem to prefer softer eggs at times and will reject harder eggs. If you're fishing big water and making long retrieves and big casts, a little bit harder egg can be beneficial. Slow and deep winter water a softer egg is usually better.

Salmon eggs don't do well in the freezer unless hardened a little. Trout eggs seem to do fine frozen without being hardened any. My preference is trout scrape for float fishing. Water is the enemy, keep them as dry as possible until they go on a hook. They have a short shelf life though so if you're fishing frequent short sessions, it is nice to have eggs that will last in the fridge you can grab and go whenever. These get a slight harden and then coated in borax. Get a paint strainer and put the loose eggs in it from the fish. Dip in river water a couple times and then spin the bag in the air to get the water out. The eggs are in the water for less than a minute which makes a firm but not hard egg. Put the eggs in a bag and take home. Lay them out on paper towels and dry off. Put them in day sized portions in quart sized ziplocks. Shake them up to coat the eggs in borax. Seal up the bags and freeze. These are good for years in the freezer and will last in the fridge for up to two months. I have some that I am still working through in the freezer from 2008 that are mint😎. You need a non-self defrosting freezer. Frost free freezers will ruin frozen eggs over time.
Thanks for the explanation! You really know your eggs! I'm excited to harvest and cure my own eggs. I really appreciate the info!
 

·
Wishin' I was fishin'
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just read an article about cutting pieces of sponge into small "eggs". Dip in melted petroleum jelly mixed with some anise oil. Anyone try this? I'm thinking about trying this year, sounds simple and keeps indefinitely.
My wife was telling me about this the other day, I thought she was messing with me!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top