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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have very poor rain water run-off from the downspouts all around the house, mainly because all of them tie into a 4 inch pipe. This pipe then travels about 400 feet through flat landscape, neighbor's property and under his driveway and then comes out at the side of a large ditch. We have had multiple well-reputed gutter companies come out to help us solve the drainage problem.

Rep. from first one had no idea how to solve this problem. So I had been thinking myself how to solve it and I think building dry-wells in the back is the only possible solution. We do have more than enough drop-off in elevation for water to drain. Had another reputable gutter company come out to give us an estimate for dry-wells (not sure if he would have come up with this solution himself). I was shocked to hear the cost of around $6k to add two dry wells in the back.

In my head I was thinking, damn this is like how much a used 4 wheeler would cost. So I tried to get as much info out of him as I could (details on this below). Fast forward to last weekend, and guess what. I did buy a used 4 wheeler last weekend. So have to go dry wells myself. Below is my plan on to add dry wells based on my conversation with the rep.

Plan:
Rep. recommended given the size of house and roof surface area, I would need two dry-wells. Each measuring 5 feet wide and 3 feet deep. I already have the holes dug by neighbor/farmer.

Rep. said they use 57 and 304 gravel to fill the holes up to about 4 inches below grade. Then cover with fabric, put top-soil and spread some grass seeds. And he also recommended to have emergency outlet little before the drain pipe enters the dry-well.

Gonna rent trencher from local Home Depot to trench out and lay 4 inch pipe going all the way to dry wells.

Question
Given the plan above as detailed by the rep. and me looking for info online, I am thinking of layering the hole with some sort of soil separator fabric sold at HD or Lowe's. Then putting a layer of 304 gravel at the bottom about 4 inches thick to create a solid base for the rest of the gravel. Then filling the rest of the hole with number 4 gravel instead of 57. My thinking here is that number 4 is larger than 57, so I would use less and consequently more empty space in the dry-well for water to drain. What do you folks think of using number 4 instead of number 57 gravel?

Also, what kinda PVC pipe should I be using for rain water drainage?

Any other suggestions / recommendations on this would be much appreciated. Would like to do it once and do it right.

Thanks a lot in advance. This forum has been very helpful to me.
 

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We have very poor rain water run-off from the downspouts all around the house, mainly because all of them tie into a 4 inch pipe. This pipe then travels about 400 feet through flat landscape, neighbor's property and under his driveway and then comes out at the side of a large ditch. We have had multiple well-reputed gutter companies come out to help us solve the drainage problem.

Rep. from first one had no idea how to solve this problem. So I had been thinking myself how to solve it and I think building dry-wells in the back is the only possible solution. We do have more than enough drop-off in elevation for water to drain. Had another reputable gutter company come out to give us an estimate for dry-wells (not sure if he would have come up with this solution himself). I was shocked to hear the cost of around $6k to add two dry wells in the back.

In my head I was thinking, damn this is like how much a used 4 wheeler would cost. So I tried to get as much info out of him as I could (details on this below). Fast forward to last weekend, and guess what. I did buy a used 4 wheeler last weekend. So have to go dry wells myself. Below is my plan on to add dry wells based on my conversation with the rep.

Plan:
Rep. recommended given the size of house and roof surface area, I would need two dry-wells. Each measuring 5 feet wide and 3 feet deep. I already have the holes dug by neighbor/farmer.

Rep. said they use 57 and 304 gravel to fill the holes up to about 4 inches below grade. Then cover with fabric, put top-soil and spread some grass seeds. And he also recommended to have emergency outlet little before the drain pipe enters the dry-well.

Gonna rent trencher from local Home Depot to trench out and lay 4 inch pipe going all the way to dry wells.

Question
Given the plan above as detailed by the rep. and me looking for info online, I am thinking of layering the hole with some sort of soil separator fabric sold at HD or Lowe's. Then putting a layer of 304 gravel at the bottom about 4 inches thick to create a solid base for the rest of the gravel. Then filling the rest of the hole with number 4 gravel instead of 57. My thinking here is that number 4 is larger than 57, so I would use less and consequently more empty space in the dry-well for water to drain. What do you folks think of using number 4 instead of number 57 gravel?

Also, what kinda PVC pipe should I be using for rain water drainage?

Any other suggestions / recommendations on this would be much appreciated. Would like to do it once and do it right.

Thanks a lot in advance. This forum has been very helpful to me.
I've done these before,did basement waterproofing and foundation work for 6 years. Use 57 gravel and make sure its riverbed gravel,not whitestone. You can use 4" 3500 pvc
 

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I would use a washed gravel vs. limestone. Limestone tends to pack tighter and that is not what you want. I would definitely use schedule 35 pvc pipe. Just be aware that drywells don’t always work, they will sometimes get overloaded in the wet seasons. They will work best if your soil is sandy/gravely. Not fan of drywells but if it’s your only option? Ive been in the drainage business since ‘88. Dang I’m getting old!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've done these before,did basement waterproofing and foundation work for 6 years. Use 57 gravel and make sure its riverbed gravel,not whitestone. You can use 4" 3500 pvc
Thanks for the response. Can you explain whats the difference btw riverbed gravel vs whitestone gravel? Not having any luck googling it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I would use a washed gravel vs. limestone. Limestone tends to pack tighter and that is not what you want. I would definitely use schedule 35 pvc pipe. Just be aware that drywells don’t always work, they will sometimes get overloaded in the wet seasons. They will work best if your soil is sandy/gravely. Not fan of drywells but if it’s your only option? Ive been in the drainage business since ‘88. Dang I’m getting old!!
Is washed gravel same as riverbed gravel? And is limestone gravel same as whitestone? Sorry new to this gravel world.

And would you recommend using number 4 gravel or 57 gravel?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Whitestone is not the same as river gravel. The long term negative is that is will eventually solidify as limestone does in water. Digging up old foundations the limestone always turned into a solid mass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Whitestone is the same as riverbed. The long term negative is that is will eventually solidify as limestone does in water. Digging up old foundations the limestone always turned into a solid mass.
So whitestone, limestone, and riverbed refer to same type of stone? Just wanna make sure I understood u right.

And this is different than washed gravel, which is rounded stone. Right?
 

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Riverbed and washed gravel are the same. They are round gravel from a gravel pit that has been rinsed.

Whitestone is limestone.
 

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I have both limestone 57’s and river run gravel at our house. I can take some pictures today to show the difference. Limestone will compact and lock in place, river run will stay loose. Limestone 57’s are mined from solid limestone and then manufactured. River run gravel was created by the force of water in a natural waterway and then mined. It drives the quarry guys nuts if I call their stone “gravel”. What kind of soil do you have? If it’s all clay the dry wells may not drain out “well”.
 

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Yes I agree that some soils do not drain water good. You may dig your dry well fill it with stone then the water will just sit in there and not get absorbed by the ground.
Have you looked into French Drains pretty much the same thing except you have more surface area for the water to get absorbed vs a big hole in the ground.
 

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Like others have said, soil types are very key. Since you have a problem I will assume you have clay, as sand or gravel subsoil would be draining.
I vote for the french drain on a slope with drainage tile. That way your draining and absorbing the full length and during high flows it's all draining. There are ton of videos on youtube about them
 

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If you have clay you could dig a small pond and run your downspouts to the pond. That’s a win win-you have a place to drain your water to and a place to fish.
 

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Another option would be to dig a drywell (bigger the better) and put washed gravel (the gravel size doesn’t really matter) in the bottom of the hole. Then lay a roll of 250’ perf. flex drain pipe (must be perforated). Leave the roll of pipe tied together, don’t bother cutting the string holding the pipe together. Hook onto that roll of pipe with a vertical pipe and add a tee for your pipe coming in. Then continue to add another pipe on top of the tee above ground so you can look down the pipe to observe your water level throughout the year. Backfill the remaining hole with gravel.
 
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