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Drainage into retention pond

814 Views 12 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  iceman
Daughter and husband recently built home and their backyard has a retention pond.
The drain pipes from gutters
and I believe sewer daylight and water flushes into the pond.
They want to put some stone to filter the water before it enters pond. I took a pic which I will include.

Couple questions
1. Seems like a lot of pipe exposed... Should it be cut?
Dirt and grass over top?
2. Is limestone best aggregate?
3. I have access at fair price to some sandstone would that be ok?
4. Fabric under the stone?
I'm thinking about 3 foot wide are dig under pipe and have stone set under and along pipe down into water.
I know Doboy has pond building experience and expertise... Hopefully, he sees this post馃

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It's all preference, except don't use sandstone. It erodes quickly and some will just fall apart. Don't over think it, you just need to prevent the water from making direct contact with water coming from the pipes. There's plenty of ways to do that. A small pile of #1 limestone (3"-5") would be perfect, but I wouldn't buy a load of gravel just for that.
I would find out for sure what both pipes are draining. A would be surprised if either is draining raw sewage (maybe aerated/treated?). A better look would be dig two little ditches, cut them back far enough, add 45 degree elbow, run mor pipe down to the water (high level), and cover with dirt. If you add stone for filtering s it is, it will probably look pretty ugly in a year or two.
Definitely not sewage just rain water
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Any suggestions on where to get #1 limestone?
I am not sure of the homes features but one of the pipes I suspect is probably for the house perimeter/ sump pump discharge drainage. This drain would include the downspout drains from the gutters and be separate from the sump well collection drains. The second pipe is more than likely a perimeter boundary drain which functions as a water collection / channeling drain for surface water drainage throughout the yard and any features like a septic leach field. This does not collect the sewage discharge water which is absorbed into the ground through distribution into multiple leach lines tied to the septic tank. This drain collects excess storm water from the surface of the yard / leach field preventing saturation of the ground and routes it to the retention pond for dissipation over an an extended period of time. Either way the water is not 鈥渃ontaminated鈥 and permissible to discharge in a retention pond. As for cutting the pipes or placing a 45 degree elbow, no such action should be necessary. The pipes are extended out intentionally to prevent erosion at the discharge point. If installed properly the grade of descent from the house should cause the water level to parallel the rise in the retention pond preventing the pond water from backing up into the pipes. Falling back on the old saying 鈥 water doesn鈥檛 flow uphill鈥. Once the water raises to the equal point in the discharge line it will overflow its banks at the retention pond instead of at the house. If the retention pond is presenting a foul odor or an unsightly visual appearance, there are many pond maintenance products available at hardware, farm and garden and online stores. Also consider a water aeration device such as a pump to create flow current in the water to stop the growth of algae in the stale stagnant water. In keeping with a resourceful thought, stock the pond with some varieties of fish which will provide entertainment as well as a food source for the family if they can create the correct ecosystem for sustainability of aquatic species. Lastly, if the home is located remotely and does not have access to pressurized fire hydrants, look into to placing a water draw pumping station in the pond which would allow the local fire department to connect to the pond and pump the retention pond water through their vehicle pumping system instead of transporting water to the scene in the unfortunate event of a fire. This could also qualify them for an insurance discount. Best of luck to the new homeowners and hopefully many years happiness in their new home.
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The whole concept of the stones is not for drainage, but energy dispersion to control erosion. Rip rap or any other large stone should be used to dissipate the energy of the water flowing out of a pipe. Water weighs 8lbs per gallon and a four inch pipe wide open shoots out a ton of water per second.
The home is located in the final phase of the Summer Wind development out in Canfield off of Turner road.
No sub pump no septic system.
When my daughter and her husband bought the plot they were under the impression that their property line went down to the water's edge and a community owned the pond. There are five homes who have backyards going down into the pond.
After some investigating they realized that back when the property was plotted out it was not designed to have a retention pond and later one was put in and the property lines were not adjusted and now you have five or six families who have that pond as part of their property.
The association I'm being told will take care of the fountain and water treatment, but the families whose backyards go down into the pond we'll be responsible for the maintaining of the banks.

I'll probably just go with the sandstone. I've seen this work rather effectively at The Lake Club golf course.

Won't will not probably get to it until this weather dries out, but we'll post some pictures when done.

Thanks for all the responses and as usual appreciate the expertise that is out there on this site.
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I鈥檝e got the French drains running to this pond and the sump pump is connected to the line as well. The second pic shows the discharge pipe.
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I have an oxygen pump bubbler and a UV filter connected to a 10k gallon pond pump. We keep koi and have some frogs with the occasional painted turtle visitor. My friends little ones love to stop over and feed the koi. I鈥檓 working on building an overflow area if this dry steak holds out. It has worked well for us.
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Beautiful pics and very impressive for sure...
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The original picture that I posted was from her neighbors backyard they're backyard only had the one white 4-in discharge pipe that handled the water from their downspouts and gutters...
I extended the pipe and had a body 4 ft section of 5/8 rebar that we heated and bent to fit around the pipe and drove that rebar into the ground helping the pipe lay down more towards the water level and then we backfilled with fill dirt and then I finished with stone...

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Their backyard;)
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