Disc Sander for curves

Discussion in 'Tackle Making' started by hazmail, Nov 2, 2007.

  1. I have read a few posts lately, here and on other forum, on sanding curves- This will not quite do compound curves but will do concave/ convex. I made this about 20 years ago and have used it for all my sanding ever since.
    I use a disc sander I made with a motor from a free standing (i.e. portable) evaporative cooler (not sure what you call them there), I picked it up at the rubbish tip for $10. Just pull the ‘pelton fan blades’ off both ends of the motor and you have a low revving 4 speed double shafted electric motor. They are usually, 3 or 4 speed (about 150 rpm max); the motors are sealed, so no arching (because they operate in a very humid atmosphere), the shaft comes off both sides of the motor, so you can put a disc on both ends (fine & coarse).

    What do I mean by an evaporative cooler – ‘ Google‘ it or
    Evaporative coolers use a fan or blower to draw in outside air and pass it through a wet filter. As hot, dry air moves through the filter the water evaporates, cooling and humidifying the air. The cooled air is then blown through the room or house.
    These are some of the profiles I do, the smaller one is 2" and the larger 3"

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    The disc is made of "custom wood" not sure what it is called there but it is composite sheet used in cabinetry/ kitchens etc. The material I used is 1" thick . I roughly cut out a circle near the size I needed and fixed it to the shaft. I then made a tool rest and 'turned' the edge with an appropriate size wood lathe tool ( I made one out of a file ground to the right radius).

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    As you can see you could add another disc on the opposite end and have coarse/ fine. this sander does it all (for me), takes a few to get used to sanding curves but when you get the knack, you will be impressed with how easy and accurate you can be.

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    Have fun Pete
     
  2. awesome thinking outside the box there haz, lure builders minds never stop eh!!!!!

    Etch
     

  3. I should have added to this post-
    This sander, like most sanders will eat balsa and most low density woods like cedar. Pines (radiata, Oregon etc) are a bit more difficult as the grain is of 2/3 densities and the blank will "bounce" / vibrate, when applied to the convex edge of the sander. In my opinion these timbers are inferior anyway, because of the different densities, sap etc. I use Kauri pine (Aus native) or sometimes cedar (Canadian Red or Western Red) and even with Balsa/Kauri/Cedar I find some to be dense and a lot harder to sand. I suppose what I am trying to say is, pick your timber. If you have to choose between 2 planks at the yard, go for the lighter one, life and wear on tools /sander will be much easier and you can all ways add weight later- but then again a lot of this probably goes for any part of lure building. pete
     
  4. ETCH- As I said I have been using this for at least 20 years (on and Off), probably 25 and have just come to realise, everyone is still hand sanding curves- can't believe someone else has not come up with something like this - but that's the problem sometimes people like to take all the info and add nothing and have any ideas die with them.
    There may be some time saving here for those beautiful little legs on your frogs?? But I am not sure of the sizes so maybe not. Hope it helps. Pete
     
  5. Pete that is very impressive. I work in a cabinet shop and that is really using the noggin! You have really really screwed me up know! LOL You have me thinking a thousand new ideas. Many sleepless nights ahead! LOL
    John
     
  6. Thanks Tigger, like I have said, I can't believe someone has not put something like this up earlier - thought most of you guys would be using something like it, really makes curves easy. Pete