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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
whats the normal limit for crappies? The other day I talked to 2 different guys who kept 75+. We should all do our part to maintain good fisheries and try to keep less so others can enjoy the sport.
 

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whats the normal limit for crappies? The other day I talked to 2 different guys who kept 75+. We should all do our part to maintain good fisheries and try to keep less so others can enjoy the sport.
Normally there is no limit. Some lakes have limits, but the normal ohio reg. says no limit.
 

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75+ is crazy!!! I really don't under stand why they dont limit the crappie harvest.
 

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Catch it, then eat it :)
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Keep them all

In most our lake there are to many thats why we catch alot of 6-7 inch stunted fish..

a few less and there is more food for the rest to grow into slabs
 

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You are right, we need a size limit as well as a creel amount, A 9 in. size limit would be great and 30 fish per man sounds fair. This way someday in the future our grandkids will have some nice fish to catch,.A few years I fished N.Y. and the had a 9 in. size limit and a 25 Crappie per man. I dont know what it is today maybe the same. Our ODRN does not stop to use there heads, they act like they don't give a s--T about us fisherman, another thing I would like to see the ODNR is to start stocking the lakes again . :C
GOOD FISHING GUYS
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
honestly I like to keep fish just as much as the next guy... but we seriously need to stop and think about the future of our favorite past time. Also you have to think about the fact that the smaller(possible keeper) one you throw back this year will be a slab next year.
 

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Seems to me that the panfish populations in our northeat ohio lakes are doing just fine the way the regulations are now. Mosquito Lake as an example recieves probably more pressure than any other local lake. Yet year after year provides an excellent slab crappie fishery year after year.

Back in the seventies I kept hearing at work how Mosquito was fished out. It was not true then and it is not true now.
 

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Jiggin w/ a Crappie killa
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I know that Hoover Dam, Alum and Deer creek have a 9" size limit but no bag limit. People don't care even if there is a limit, with no presence of the man out walkin the banks and in the water on a regular basis. Who is gonna stop somebody at Hoover with a a bucket full of 6-7 inch crappie. Even if you call to turn them in by the time someone gets around to check he'll be gone. I've seen it so many times...:mad: That's why I'm only keeping FO fish, I'm more in it for the sport and not for a meal for the night. I've keep onlt three since late March, not to bad.
 

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MOD SQUAD
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I know that Hoover Dam, Alum and Deer creek have a 9" size limit but no bag limit
when did hoover implement a 9 inch minimum?are there signs posted on the lake?personally i keep nothing under 10,but that limit is not noted in the regs,and i haven't noticed any signs at hoover.but i haven't looked for them either;)
i think there was talk of it at one time,but have not heard one way or the other since.

as for stocking,most waters that hold crappie have no need to be stocked.natural reproduction is good eneough to maintain good pops.some are even over populated,which contributes to stunting,in which case a minimum size would most likely do more harm than good.
 

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As Misfit said some bodies of water would not benefit from a size restriction because you would be leaving more fish in the lake than what the food source could reasonably sustain and thus the size of the fish would be stunted. I don't know that you would find many lakes throughout the state that had a shortage of crappie as far as quantity so a limit on the number of fish I would not think would make much difference. Perhaps some lakes would be improved by a smaller harvest of the under 9" fish I believe that a lot of lakes would still have folks catching a large number of under 9" fish on each outing. In most lakes there are bigger fish there. It is just a matter of finding them or weeding through the smaller ones.

I guess the bottom line is that for the most part crappies are a renewable source that can sustain itself pretty well in most lakes without the DNR's regulation. Sure some may be a bit better with changes but look at what we have. I am sure that the guys taking 75 crappies home didn't just start this year and they are still catch fish at that rate. That would indicate that they supply is keeping up with the harvest or else we would be hearing more guys reporting not catching fish at all as opposed to not catching the big ones.
 

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I agree with several of the points already made. I really don't think we need the ODNR to regulate crappie. A minimum length is good, but a bag limit is just unnecessary.

Also, who keeps 75 crappie. You ever try to freeze them and thaw them out to cook later. They don't hold up well in the freezer for any length of time at all. They come out all flaky and fall apart and don't taste nearly as good fresh. I used to keep a bunch(12 to 20) and freeze em, but not anymore. Saugeye hold up to freezing much better. I'll eat crappie fresh so I take home 2 to 6 fish from time to time, but I just don't understand who wants to clean 75 fish and them freeze them when they don't hold up well to that anyway? Makes no sense to me.

CG
 

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Powderfinger
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Different strokes for different folks. No problem with keeping 75+ or 175+ crappie.
I'd rather see a maximum size limit like 10" than a minimum size limit and no daily bag limit.
 

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mike,i WOULD have to keep 175 just for a meal,with that size limit:D ;)
 

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If a stringer of 75+ quality sized crappies was a realistic possibility every day of the year then I'd say yeah its time for the DOW to jump in and put some controls in place. The fact is, there's only a narrow window of opportunity (like now!) when these types of stringers get any notice.
 

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Freeze fish(any fish), in a zip-lock bag with enough water to cover the filets, squeeze the bag down to the water level to eliminate as much air as you can, and they will easily keep very nicely for a year or longer. Vacuum sealing fish gives good freezer longevity also.
Now, about the limits, I'm no expert but I've read a lot of information on pan fish and I've always understood panfish are so prolific that they cannot be fished out of a lake or pond completely by hook and line. They can definitely have their size impeded(stunting) by UNDER-fishing. Just my 2 cents...
 

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The same people that fillet a 16" crappie think nothing of keep dozens of fish. There is no difference between a trophy crappie and a trophy bass. For those tyhat advocate keeping as many "panfish" as you want you should read up on "panfish" biology and selective harvest. Killing big sunfish slows the growth rates of the smaller/younger fish. A 10 or 12 year old "panfish" takes 10 to 12 years to replace not 1. Keeping too many does not "free up" space for more. It is true that "panfish" cannot be fished out but they can be severely fished down in only a year or two of intense pressure. I am lazy - I HATE cleaning more than a dozen fish and that is enough for two meals for two. I follow selective harvest and try to keep medium sized fish. I can't imagine putting the knife to a fish ohio sized crappie - I respect them too much (this goes for all fish).
 

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A 10 or 12 year old "panfish" takes 10 to 12 years to replace not 1
how many panfish live that long?a 10 to 12 year old panfish of any kind would be a rare specimen.most all have an average lifespan of only 6-8 years,and the very rare one that did make it to that age would be awfully close to the end of it's reproductive years,and probably not the most fertile specimen.
this is only a statement of facts and not an argument for or against the harvest of larger panfish.
another fact is,some waters will regularly produce greater numbers of larger fish than others.
 
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