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Conversion factor?

Discussion in 'Boats and Motors' started by Hook N Book, Oct 11, 2004.

  1. Hook N Book

    Hook N Book The Original Hot Rod Staff Member

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    Anyone know of a conversion factor/rule of thumb for converting hours (metered) to miles? It seems to me I had heard some years back it's 1 hour equals 15 miles.

    Thanks
     
  2. I'm not sure I understand. :confused: That would be directly dependent on the average speed.
     

  3. Hook N Book

    Hook N Book The Original Hot Rod Staff Member

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    M. Magis, thanks for your response and sorry I wasn't clear. Most, but not all hour meters are installed to log time whenever the ignition switch is in the run position. You're also logging time when warming up the engine or just at idle and in the neutral gear. Granted there is no load on the engine in either scenario but you are, indeed, still logging time. Also, I mostly troll logging a lot of hours at low speed, so averaging speed wouldn't be a true indicator of your milage if you also consider the idle time. Somewhere I had read or was told that there's some number to use to get a general idea of what these numbers (hours) convert to in hypothetical miles. I'm just really somewhat curious to compare how a marine engine stacks-up to an automotive engine maintance wise.

    Thanks
     
  4. It seems that there are far too many factors to consider to get to a mile figure. You have boat size, prop design, amount of time spent idling vs. full throttle. I think you may be btter off to try and go the other way and determine an average number of hours on a car engine. You can probably come up with a better estimate of time on your own vehicle given your driving. I hope this helps.
     
  5. If u wanted miles, you have to Have an average speed(meters per second or miles per hour) and a time in hours or seconds, and multiply the speed by the time. Considering you kept to a certain speed, and the hours of motor run time are recorded, you could then figure out the miles, but you need a miles per hour reading, and thus, a gage. Say the mph gauge read 2.5 mph(average), and the hours gage read 5 hours, you could then assume that you traveled 12.5 miles.