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concrete vs. asphalt

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by ltfd596, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. I am going to be finishing up my driveway this spring/summer.

    What are the major benifit and downsides of concrete versus asphalt?

    Obviously, concrete is more expensive, but it is a once and done thing. Asphalt is cheaper, but requires more maintenance.

    I am intersted in your opinions.

    Secondly, I have about 1040 sq/ft of drive way.... anyone have a rough estimate of the cost of each. I was thining about 5 in of concrete would be enough.

    Lastly, if you know of anybody who does concrete or asphalt in the Youngstown area (Northern Columbiana County) give me a shout.... I will be needing someone in the next few months.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2009
  2. ao203

    ao203 member

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    if you got the money to use concrete, i would do that. just don't salt it in the winter, or park a leaky car on it and it will last alot longer with little maintenance.
     

  3. Concrete would last longer and be less maintenance. You would need about 16.5 yards if you go 5" thick but really you only need 4" and that would take about 13 yards. Call up your local ready mix producer and ask who does work in your area, they'll know who the good guys are.
     
  4. i work for a large contractor in cincinnati and i called a couple of suppliers about cost for a couple sidejobs. all of the companys said as of april 1st the cost of portland would jump up, that would translate to $10 to $15 a yard increase. i personally would do it in concrete if the funds are available.
     
  5. well being a concrete guy....you know which one I'd recommend :). Although ready mixed prices have gone up quite a bit in the past year, I understand that asphalt prices have skyrocketed so it might not be THAT much cheaper. 4" is plenty thick, just make sure u have a good compacted base. I'd recommend having the ready mix company add nylon fibers to the mix. adds a couple bucks more a yard but will help with plastic shrinkage cracking.
    As far as pricing, I would think that if the base is already in and only requires minor regrading that you could get the job done for somewhere in the neighborhood of $4/sqr. foot.
    Just remember that if you do go with 5" of concrete, the equivalent strength in asphalt might be as much as 8 inches.
     
  6. mines concrete 33yrs old still in pretty good shape ,I plow it but never ever put salt on it. neoghbors is blk top ,he;s replaced it twice and needs it again.
     
  7. No-Net

    No-Net EYE GUY

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    I'm an asphalt guy and mine is concrete, I think that is all I need to say.
     
  8. ezbite

    ezbite the Susan Lucci of OGF

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    ive got a concrete drive, i wish i could pour it all over my back yard.
     
  9. sady dog

    sady dog sady dog

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    concrete is the best..no maintance and it looks really nice....BUT your property tax will go up due to the fact that cocncrete driveways are considered an additional structure and it will add to the value of your home quite a bit which in return will raise your property tax...at least in columbus it does? Any way a good price for that kind of drive would be 8 to 9 dollars?
     
  10. FishlessAgain

    FishlessAgain One Major Lurker

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    How much cheaper is asphalt then concrete?
     
  11. Boatnut -

    Would 4" of concrete hold up to some of the larger trucks (ie... propane, septic, UPS..) or would you reccommend going up to a thicker slab?

    FM1800 - what thickness would you reccommend for asphalt? I have a long drive, and do not know if I could afford the concrete.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2009
  12. I work for a ready mix producer and saugeye nut is right the cost of cement has gone way up. We have already increased our price for the year but we also have a winter charge that is on until April. So if you call now and get prices make sure you ask if they have a winter charge on and if so when it comes off and also about any price increase there might be.
    The fibers that boatnut is talking about I dont think you need. I'm not saying he does'nt know what he is talking about, he sounds like he knows a good bit about concrete, but if you get good concrete and its finished good you should'nt need the fibers and they are pretty expensive. If you want re-inforcement the best thing to do is use wire mesh or rebar and make sure that you pull it up into the middle of the concrete as you pour it and NOT leave it laying on the bottom. The fibers may help with shrinkage cracks but they will also make the concrete harder to finish and you may end up with a hairy driveway from all the fibers sticking up out of the concrete. Now a guy like boatnut who knows what he is doing probably would have no problem with the fibers and would do just fine, we have a few guys that use them every time they pour. I would say that probably less than 5% of the flat work that we deliver to gets the fibers. Again I'm coming from the producer side of things.
     
  13. bttmline

    bttmline E.B.C.C. Founder

    Here is a clue. Follow the guy who owns the asphalt company home. I bet he has concrete.
     
  14. I'm a glutton for punishment.

    But after 15yrs. of cracking, patching, filling, what not the asphalt kept spreading & cracking.

    I put in a concrete border aprox., 10" X 1 foot deep.

    Rented a ditch whitch & dug up each side of my drive aprox., 16'' deep

    Found a GOOD deal on damaged plywood, cut my forms that I re-used for my entire drive,

    Filled & tapped in crushed limestone base,
    Borrowed a cheapie cement mixer & mixed 112 bags of concrete 2 at a time, , poured in a grey color mix, finished it & stamped a slate finish to it.

    Had my old asphalt removed, re-graded my drive with 2 truck loads of new base, & since 2005 my drive looks as good as the day it was laid.

    I recoat every 2 years with GOOD stuff takes about 3 hrs., & go fishing a couple of days while it dry's.

    [​IMG]

    It's not a easy task but rewarding, some weekends I would only pour 10' at a crack, so having saved the cost of a total concrete drive was saved cause it would have been tooo much $$$$$, this one will last till I, well for me?
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2009
  15. I have 5500 sq.ft. of fifteen year old 3.5"/4" nominal thickness asphalt that still looks good and will be here for a lot longer. I have had it coated three times in that time span as well as having a few minor cracks filled. A properly installed base as well as asphalt installation is the key to a long lasting job.
    I contracted a reputable excavator separately for the base. My drive remains undamaged through the years even though I have septic and medium size dump trucks that use it. I preferred the looks of asphalt for my wooded setting as well as the cost differential.
     
  16. my drive has about 135 yards of concrete in it. It's long with a circular loop and a parking area. I had a good base down for a year before I poured it. I poured it at 4" thick and used wire mesh (no fibers at that time ). I routinely have propane delivered, septic tank truck , UPS, single axle dump trucks etc. and have had no cracking or heaving issues. Its been down almost 20 years. now.