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HeWhoDiesWithTheMostToysWins
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A good friend sent this to me,,, interesting.

City of Maumee caught after 20 years of sewage dumping

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Unlike permitted livestock farms, such as CAFOs, that are not allowed to discharge an ounce of manure into Ohio’s waterways, municipalities have agreements with Ohio EPA to allow for a certain amount of sewage to be dumped directly into tributaries located in watersheds that flow into Lake Erie.
For Maumee, Ohio, that agreement is 25 million gallons per year. However, due to an outdated sewer infrastructure, the municipality has actually been adding as much as 150 million gallons of sewage into the Maumee River for each of the past 20 years.
City Law Director David Busick confirmed that Department of Public Service Sewer Division employees, who keep track of sewer discharge levels, did not comply with the law when they failed to self-report the incidences of annual sewer overflow in Maumee. The City Council has since approved an action plan that requires mandated maintenance upgrades and infrastructure replacement guidelines. The city has also been fined by Ohio EPA to the tune of $29,936, which can be applied to remediation steps.
“We have always said that water quality issues are complex, involving many sources of nutrients, changing weather patterns and lack of data,” said Adam Sharp, executive vice president of Ohio Farm Bureau. “We are certainly not absolving agriculture of its contribution to this challenge or responsibility in finding solutions, but what Maumee has been doing over the past two decades is disturbing and makes you wonder if other municipalities with equally run down sewer infrastructures are having similar issues.”
During the same period that Maumee was illegally dumping massive amounts of sewage, Ohio farmers have been using new equipment and technology to maximize the placement of nutrients used for crop production. They also are following strict state regulations and participating in voluntary water quality programs like H2Ohio find better management practices to minimize the amount of nutrient runoff from farm fields and into the watershed.
“Farmers have been heavily scrutinized for their impact on Lake Erie and have answered that criticism with unprecedented efforts to help solve the problem. It is time to hold municipal administrations and their wastewater facilities to the same standards,” Sharp said. “If a city’s wastewater infrastructure is failing, those issues should be addressed immediately with the same urgent action Ohio agriculture has taken to protect Ohio’s water quality.”


JUST LIKE THE CITY OF YOUNGSTOWN,,,, with all of it's OVER-FLOW-PORTS,,, dumping into the Mahoning.
 

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Doboy,

Attached thread from 2005 is a similar violation down here on the GMR. I addressed the Ohio legislature in Columbus on an invite from Ohio Public Interest Group, and the Maumee and other municipalities' dumping into Lake Erie was well known and under review back then. Sound like nothing had changed. In our case the two paper mills were fined heavily, the City of Hamilton was fined, and ultimately the mills' owners shut them down because it was less expensive than compliance.

Municipalities will keep getting a pass if we all keep looking the other way. Thanks for bringing it out.
 

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Wow ! A whole 30 grand for dumping an excess 125 million gallons for 20 years ! That'll teach 'Em !
Lets see, if I did my math right, {which I probably didn't LOL} That comes out to 83,511,491 gallons of sewage to the dollar. Yea, I doubt if thats going to stop anytime soon.
Typical crooked rat politicians.
 

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Yeah, that’s a slap on the wrist! If an individual or small business was at fault they would shut em down and fine the hell out of them. Another reason our world is now going sideways. Since they were dumping “raw sewage” into the lake, they should have all their drinking water taken from the fist 100 yds of where the sewage went into the river! Or better yet, make them have to go to all the dog parks in Ohio and clean up all the “do-do” once per week for 5 yrs and wear a sign on their back-“punishment for dumping POOP in Lake Erie!
 

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Great cycle challenge team OHIO GAME FISHING
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In their eyes we're leading as far as clean water. Third world countries it all goes into the nearest river! I've been to south American and even though they have trash pickup there are morons that just treat the river as their dump instead of waiting for trash day. It's a shame. But it's not just the USA that isn't green.

I believe we should worry about our ecosystem and planet and stuff. But just because we don't have pollution from manufacturing it's offset by allowing China to produce everything along with their super stringent anti pollution........
 

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In their eyes we're leading as far as clean water. Third world countries it all goes into the nearest river! I've been to south American and even though they have trash pickup there are morons that just treat the river as their dump instead of waiting for trash day. It's a shame. But it's not just the USA that isn't green.

I believe we should worry about our ecosystem and planet and stuff. But just because we don't have pollution from manufacturing it's offset by allowing China to produce everything along with their super stringent anti pollution........
Don’t get me started on China. I witnessed several steel plants there dump all waste water directly into the rivers. Guess that’s ok though, because you can see their employees drop their pants and **** in the little grassy areas outside the factory doors.
PIGS!!!!
 

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I can remember back when Toledo had the water crisis and shut the water down and blamed only farms. Now look a town has been doing it for years and there is no penalty for them. Now hopefully the folks trying to solve the blue green Algee problem will actually do something about cities over polluting on purpose because it’s cheaper to pay a fine than correct the problem.
 

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Don’t get me started on China. I witnessed several steel plants there dump all waste water directly into the rivers. Guess that’s ok though, because you can see their employees drop their pants and **** in the little grassy areas outside the factory doors.
PIGS!!!!
If you eat rice and beans you can **** in the river. That’s fertilizer. If you are eating taco bell that’s hazardous waste. No clear path for disposal..
 

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Separation of storm and sewer is a necessity. We did it in Woodville many years back after the village was being fined by the EPA after big rain events. Our water/sewage bills were assessed for 5 years for the project, and then each home was required to separate storm from sewer. It was expensive, but it is the right thing to do.

The major cities along the lake have been working to address this problem for many years. Separating the two systems is impossible, so they have turned to using diversion basins during large scale weather events. Basically...they divert the water to a deep hole, then pump it all to the treatment plant later to clean it up. Detroit and Monroe really, really need to get in line with that type of thing.

I am sure you will find every town/city along the Maumee from Fort Wayne to the lake is guilty of dumping their storm overflow into the river. It's the way the systems were designed back in the day. Combine the overflow with agricultural run-off, and bingo....we have algae blooms.

Expect a big bloom from Monroe to Huron in the next two weeks. I mean...did anyone see the pics from Lorain where the Black river comes out? Egads...
 

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A good friend sent this to me,,, interesting.

City of Maumee caught after 20 years of sewage dumping

63

Leave a Comment
Unlike permitted livestock farms, such as CAFOs, that are not allowed to discharge an ounce of manure into Ohio’s waterways, municipalities have agreements with Ohio EPA to allow for a certain amount of sewage to be dumped directly into tributaries located in watersheds that flow into Lake Erie.
For Maumee, Ohio, that agreement is 25 million gallons per year. However, due to an outdated sewer infrastructure, the municipality has actually been adding as much as 150 million gallons of sewage into the Maumee River for each of the past 20 years.
City Law Director David Busick confirmed that Department of Public Service Sewer Division employees, who keep track of sewer discharge levels, did not comply with the law when they failed to self-report the incidences of annual sewer overflow in Maumee. The City Council has since approved an action plan that requires mandated maintenance upgrades and infrastructure replacement guidelines. The city has also been fined by Ohio EPA to the tune of $29,936, which can be applied to remediation steps.
“We have always said that water quality issues are complex, involving many sources of nutrients, changing weather patterns and lack of data,” said Adam Sharp, executive vice president of Ohio Farm Bureau. “We are certainly not absolving agriculture of its contribution to this challenge or responsibility in finding solutions, but what Maumee has been doing over the past two decades is disturbing and makes you wonder if other municipalities with equally run down sewer infrastructures are having similar issues.”
During the same period that Maumee was illegally dumping massive amounts of sewage, Ohio farmers have been using new equipment and technology to maximize the placement of nutrients used for crop production. They also are following strict state regulations and participating in voluntary water quality programs like H2Ohio find better management practices to minimize the amount of nutrient runoff from farm fields and into the watershed.
“Farmers have been heavily scrutinized for their impact on Lake Erie and have answered that criticism with unprecedented efforts to help solve the problem. It is time to hold municipal administrations and their wastewater facilities to the same standards,” Sharp said. “If a city’s wastewater infrastructure is failing, those issues should be addressed immediately with the same urgent action Ohio agriculture has taken to protect Ohio’s water quality.”


JUST LIKE THE CITY OF YOUNGSTOWN,,,, with all of it's OVER-FLOW-PORTS,,, dumping into the Mahoning.
True, But let's not forget that the system was designed 100+ years ago. Also, every steel mill from Warren to Campbell pulled water from the river for cooling steel and dumped it right back in. I have read that Volney Rogers, the Youngstown lawyer who donated the land for Mill Creek Park, raised holy Hell when he heard about the sewer system's design. I wish they had listened to him.

I also wish that the OEPA let us off as easily as Maumee. We are on the hook for close to $100 Million to correct this sewage issue! Now we have all this taxpayer funded government largesse coming our way, that the Mayor has called a "legacy opportunity". I hope that part of that legacy is some relief from the onerous sewage rates that city of Youngstown water customers pay! When I was the executor of my Mom's estate, she had lived in a house in Boardman that was appraised at 3 times the value of my house in Youngstown. Yet, her water bills were a pittance compared to mine. What was the big difference? You guessed it, the sewage rate! We pay through the nose!
 

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My first thought was “how did they get away with this for so long?” My second was “I am really glad I fish upstream of Maumee during the walleye spawning run in the Spring. And then.... it dawned on me.... the walleye swim through all that crap from the lake when they come in to spawn.

No matter what, this is hugely disappointing, and nothing more than a slap on the wrist, especially considering how long it went on.
 

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Konfused Kayaker
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BFG got it right. These 100 year old sewer systems need to be re-done. A lot of cities still can't handle combined overflow after heavy rain events (looking at you, Crakron).
That's why NEO Regional Sewer is digging those giant tunnels to hold overflow. Even our little town of Bedford put in a giant cement structure to hold the overflows
so they can process it. The little creek behind our house, where Bedford discharges is now actually cleaner downstream from the treatment plant than it is above it!
It's going to take years to get it all straightened out.

If you think it's bad here, England is 30-40 years behind us. All their rivers get actual pure sewage discharges. Definitely no fish in the rivers overs there.
 

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A couple things come to my mind when I read this. First several have said Maumee got off too easy with a $30K fine. Probably, but remember that Maumee won't be paying the fine, that would be the citizens of Maumee, who probably had no idea it was going on. There needs to be a way to hold officials that allowed the under reporting personally liable. I have to believe it would be far more impactful than a fine to the city.

The article also points out that during the period of the discharges many farmers have voluntarily participated in programs like H2Ohio to set aside crop land in particular areas to reduce nutrients from entering waterways. Bear in mind that these farmers are being compensated for that idle land. Again guess who is footing that bill? Not saying that is a bad use of tax payer $ but we need to make sure we have a more complete picture of what is going on and who is paying the bill. I wonder how much of that land voluntarily left idle is poor quality land that doesn't really produce much to begin with? I know a few of my neighbors have those buffers. The land around my place was good ground so I think it's great they are participating. As several have said, this is a long term problem but glad it's being studied and real efforts are being made. Just my 2 cents.
 
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