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Discussion Starter #1
Was fishing from boat near entrance to the Mud Lake area. Something bubbling up from the bottom. Steady stream of bubbles. Anyone know what that is?

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Discussion Starter #4
It's not turtles. It's a steady stream like something leaking from a pipe or the ground.

Sunday am my bro-in-law was out with me. He got 2 small bass and a crappie. I got nothing. We were in the deeper holes that day. The day before we went to Mud Lake and I got a LM about 12 inches and my bro-in-law got a channel cat about 4 pounds. That was our first time there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK, will do. I didn't smell anything and I was right on top of it in my kayak.
 

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As I said, I have fished that lake for 30 years and those bubbles have always been there, so I am guessing that it is something natural. I bet the guys at the Miflin Trading Post would know what it is.

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Either a underground river or a methane pocket. Sites lak is a "blue hole" that has a underground river under it. In 1846 a guy dug a ditch from it to make his farm land bigger. Well it caused the shore line to fall in turning it into a 60 acre lake. They felt it up to 16 miles away, the people at the time thought the world was ending. There's another story of a diver getting sucked into a underground river near baileys lake and ending up popping out in Charles mills or sites lake, been a minute since I've heard the story. Also that area is full of gas wells, so could be gas if its been steady for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I asked

Rick Pavey
Surficial Geology Technical Administrator
Geologic Mapping and Industrial Minerals Group
Ohio Geological Survey

and he said

The consensus in the group is that you’re dealing with naturally occurring methane [a.k.a. “swamp gas”], which has no smell. Commercial natural gas has an odor added to it so that leaks can be detected. The valley was very swampy before the dam was built, and this spot is likely over an area of drowned peat that is now decaying and producing the gas. Unless you confine the gas, it probably isn’t concentrated enough to be a danger.
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Wonder if it bothers the fish. <--- foton's comment
 
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